Terre Haute, IN, United States
Terre Haute, IN, United States

Indiana State University is a public university located in Terre Haute, Indiana, United States.The Princeton Review has named Indiana State as one of the "Best in the Midwest" 11 years running, U.S. News & World Report classifies Indiana State University as a tier 2 national university. The current Carnegie classification for ISU is Doctorallanguage pathology programs are nationally recognized.Indiana State is a diverse university, with 3.8% of students attending as international students and 19.5% of students belonging to a minority. Of the 19.5% minority students, 75.4% are African American, 8.3% are multiracial, 8.3 percent are Hispanic and Latino American, 5.8 percent are Asian American, and 2.1 percent are Native American.Indiana State is the first public university in Indiana to require incoming freshmen to have a laptop. ISU offers Lenovo Thinkpad T430u laptops to incoming freshmen with high school GPAs of 3.0 or higher as part of its Laptop Initiative.ISU is a member of the College Consortium of Western Indiana. This membership allows students who are full-time at their home institution to take classes at the other member institutions of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has released its list of Indiana’s best colleges for 2017. Of the 46 schools honored, 44 four-year schools made the list with University of Notre Dame, Purdue University, DePauw University, Valparaiso University and Butler University taking the top five spots. Ivy Tech Community College and Ancilla College were also included as the best two-year schools in the state. A list of all schools is included below. “Education can make a huge difference when it comes to the job market,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “These schools in Indiana have not only shown a commitment to providing quality degree programs, but also the employment services that contribute to student success as they pursue careers.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Indiana” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also scored on additional data that includes annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, employment and academic services offered, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and the availability of financial aid. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Indiana” list, visit: Indiana’s Best Colleges for 2017 include: Ancilla College Anderson University Ball State University Bethel College-Indiana Butler University Calumet College of Saint Joseph DePauw University Earlham College Franklin College Goshen College Grace College and Theological Seminary Hanover College Huntington University Indiana Institute of Technology Indiana State University Indiana University-Bloomington Indiana University-East Indiana University-Kokomo Indiana University-Northwest Indiana University-Purdue University-Fort Wayne Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis Indiana University-South Bend Indiana University-Southeast Indiana Wesleyan University Ivy Tech Community College Manchester University Marian University Martin University Oakland City University Purdue University-Calumet Campus Purdue University-Main Campus Purdue University-North Central Campus Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology Saint Joseph’s College Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College Saint Mary's College Taylor University Trine University Trine University-Regional/Non-Traditional Campuses University of Evansville University of Indianapolis University of Notre Dame University of Saint Francis-Fort Wayne University of Southern Indiana Valparaiso University Wabash College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Southern Illinois University Board of Trustees approved Rich Walker as vice chancellor for administration (VCA) for the Edwardsville campus during its regularly scheduled meeting Thursday, April 6 on the Carbondale campus. Walker stepped into the role of interim vice chancellor for administration when former VCA Kenn Neher retired in May 2016. Prior to serving as interim VCA, Walker had served as the assistant vice chancellor for administration for planning and budgeting since 2001. Walker provides leadership to the SIUE community and to the VCA directors in matters related to long-range facility planning and budget development. He has been responsible for the development of the University’s annual capital RAMP budget and the development, submission and implementation of the VCA functional area budget. Walker has served in many leadership roles in academic and professional organizations, including the SIUE Chapter of the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society, Leadership St. Louis and the Scott Air Force Base Military Affairs Committee for Leadership Council Southwestern Illinois. In addition, he was recognized with the Carol Kimmel Community Service Award for Faculty and Staff in 2005. In the Edwardsville community, Walker served on the City Council for 16 years and was chair of the finance committee, public services committee, the administrative services committee, task force on technology, Wildey Theatre development committee and represented SIUE on the City’s public safety facilities planning committee. Walker earned a master’s from SIUE and a bachelor’s from Indiana State University. Southern Illinois University Edwardsville provides students with a high quality, affordable education that prepares them for successful careers and lives of purpose. Built on the foundation of a broad-based liberal education, and enhanced by hands-on research and real-world experiences, the academic preparation SIUE students receive equips them to thrive in the global marketplace and make our communities better places to live. Situated on 2,660 acres of beautiful woodland atop the bluffs overlooking the natural beauty of the Mississippi River’s rich bottomland and only a short drive from downtown St. Louis, the SIUE campus is home to a diverse student body of more than 14,000.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 221.76K | Year: 2012

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Monitoring physiology of individual cardiomyocytes in high throughput has not been reported. The inability to perform high throughput physiological measurements limits many basic and applied studies, including the use of stem cell derived cardiomycoytes in cardiotoxicity testing. Current automated cardiotoxicity tests have poor predictive value because they use tumor cell lines engineered with single channels (e.g. hERG), and physiologically relevant tests are reserved for few candidates during the relatively late stages of development. The poor biological relevance of these models contributes to the high failure rate of drug candidates before FDA approval and even after commercialization. We have automated recording frommyocytes for Calcium Transients, but are still limited by use of electrode devices for pacing that prevents miniaturization beyond 96- well format. Furthermore, Action Potential measurement, the most relevant physiological parameter in excitable cells, isstill reserved to low throughput analysis. We propose several conceptual advances to solve these problems by developing a miniaturized, cell-based optogenetic pacing device for high throughput analysis of human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes in an automated platform for cell-by-cell cytometric analysis of cardiomyocyte physiology. We will also develop automatic segmentation/analysis of Action Potentials (AP) through fluorescent voltage probes and post-recording tracking to identify the same cells after fixation and immunostaining analysis. Calcium Transient (CT) analysis, already developed in a previous SBIR contract, will converge with AP and post-recording tracking to generate single cell multiparametric measurement of all these endpoints conducted in High Throughput. Extensive evaluation will be conducted with drugs that alter AP through different mechanisms to validate the platform. Preliminary data show that stable cell lines expressing the light-triggered protein Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) will electrically couple to cardiomyocytes, allowing optically controlled stimulation of AP without disruption of normal cardiomyocyte physiology. Membrane AP can be recorded in cardiomyocytes through voltage probes and are suitable to image segmentation analysis. Automatic CT measurement and hIPSC-derived cardiomyocytes are an effective model to test cardiotoxic effects of reference drugs. The Aims will advance the use of fluorescent probes to measure action potential, calcium flux and cell characteristics in response to the stimulation. Cardiomyocyte physiology will be quantified by image analysis software that records and analyzes single-cell AP and CT in relation to cardiac subtype or specific protein expression. The software will segment the images into single cell recordings, thus all measurements and data analysis will be on a cell-by- cell basis. The format will be evaluated for 384- and 1536-well to conduct screening on hundreds of cells per individual data point (e.g. compound tested), allowing throughput of tens to hundreds of thousands of datapoints in a single screen by the end of the funding period. Channel openers and blockers will be tested to validate the platform. The platform will find applications in basic and applied research, including regenerative medicine research and drug development/safety testing. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Large-scale studies of heart safety early during the drug development process are not currently possible or have low value because physiological testing is too arduous to perform on more than a few cells in a single experiment. Here we propose a conceptual advance of a previous design, where we have automated some of the steps enabling moderate throughput but that still rely on traditional methods to stimulate cardiomyocytes and analyze only one parameter relevant to cardiac physiology. We propose to develop a cell-based miniaturized pacing device that is stimulated by light and then activates the cardiomyocytes. We will also automate the process of Action Potential measurement and will link to Calcium Transient and cardiomyocytes subtypes to generate a comprehensive platform that analyze several aspect of cardiomyocyte physiology. The device will enable many applications, including large physiological screening for new cardioactive drugs and early testing of drug candidates for adverse cardiac toxicity, which is a major reason for drug failure during development, costing 2.5 billion annually.


Munoz M.M.,Harvard University | Munoz M.M.,Indiana State University
Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society | Year: 2014

Understanding how quickly physiological traits evolve is a topic of great interest, particularly in the context of how organisms can adapt in response to climate warming. Adjustment to novel thermal habitats may occur either through behavioural adjustments, physiological adaptation or both. Here, we test whether rates of evolution differ among physiological traits in the cybotoids, a clade of tropical Anolis lizards distributed in markedly different thermal environments on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola. We find that cold tolerance evolves considerably faster than heat tolerance, a difference that results because behavioural thermoregulation more effectively shields these organisms from selection on upper than lower temperature tolerances. Specifically, because lizards in very different environments behaviourally thermoregulate during the day to similar body temperatures, divergent selection on body temperature and heat tolerance is precluded, whereas night-time temperatures can only be partially buffered by behaviour, thereby exposing organisms to selection on cold tolerance. We discuss how exposure to selection on physiology influences divergence among tropical organisms and its implications for adaptive evolutionary response to climate warming.


Weng Q.,Indiana State University
Remote Sensing of Environment | Year: 2012

The knowledge of impervious surfaces, especially the magnitude, location, geometry, spatial pattern of impervious surfaces and the perviousness-imperviousness ratio, is significant to a range of issues and themes in environmental science central to global environmental change and human-environment interactions. Impervious surface data is important for urban planning and environmental and resources management. Therefore, remote sensing of impervious surfaces in the urban areas has recently attracted unprecedented attention. In this paper, various digital remote sensing approaches to extract and estimate impervious surfaces will be examined. Discussions will focus on the mapping requirements of urban impervious surfaces. In particular, the impacts of spatial, geometric, spectral, and temporal resolutions on the estimation and mapping will be addressed, so will be the selection of an appropriate estimation method based on remotely sensed data characteristics. This literature review suggests that major approaches over the past decade include pixel-based (image classification, regression, etc.), sub-pixel based (linear spectral unmixing, imperviousness as the complement of vegetation fraction etc.), object-oriented algorithms, and artificial neural networks. Techniques, such as data/image fusion, expert systems, and contextual classification methods, have also been explored. The majority of research efforts have been made for mapping urban landscapes at various scales and on the spatial resolution requirements of such mapping. In contrast, there is less interest in spectral and geometric properties of impervious surfaces. More researches are also needed to better understand temporal resolution, change and evolution of impervious surfaces over time, and temporal requirements for urban mapping. It is suggested that the models, methods, and image analysis algorithms in urban remote sensing have been largely developed for the imagery of medium resolution (10-100. m). The advent of high spatial resolution satellite images, spaceborne hyperspectral images, and LiDAR data is stimulating new research idea, and is driving the future research trends with new models and algorithms. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Fellowship | Program: | Phase: GRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS | Award Amount: 46.00K | Year: 2016

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) is a highly competitive, federal fellowship program. GRFP helps ensure the vitality and diversity of the scientific and engineering workforce of the United States. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students who are pursuing research-based masters and doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and in STEM education. The GRFP provides three years of financial support for the graduate education of individuals who have demonstrated their potential for significant research achievements in STEM and STEM education. This award supports the NSF Graduate Fellows pursuing graduate education at this GRFP institution.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IUSE | Award Amount: 50.00K | Year: 2015

Through the NSF Innovation Corps for Learning Program, (I-Corps L), this project will develop ways to achieve more widespread use of a teaching method proven to improve the diagnostic skills of engineering and technology students throughout the US. Diagnostic skill is one of the key competencies to be cultivated in many undergraduate technology or engineering curricular. As engineering/technology education shifting towards more outcome-based, learner-centered practice, developing effective teaching material to provide students with appropriate conceptual understanding and needed factual knowledge of technical diagnosis has become a critical task. Under prior support from the National Science Foundation a team of Indiana State University (ISU) faculty have developed a diagnostic skills training software for undergraduate technology and engineering students. Preliminary data collected from multiple technology programs at several institutions has shown that software enhances student learning on diagnostic thinking and skills. The features and flexible configuration of the software make it ideal for other STEM disciplines where diagnostic training is highly sought. With the support of I-Corps L, the project team will develop the means to promote widespread adoption, adaptation, and utilization of this promising practice.

Engineers and technicians have long used decision-trees or trouble-shooting guides to assist the diagnostic process while identifying problems in technical systems. The idea of using interactive training strategies centered around the creation and use of visual maps to develop diagnostic thinking beyond the use of decision-trees or trial-and-error is grounded in the ineffectiveness of these traditional means to solve problems. The interactive experimental setting adopted by this project uses both content knowledge and process knowledge to prompt learners to create visual (concept) maps of a diagnostic strategy, which helps learners develop a more agile habit of mind when considering solutions to problems in complex technical systems. This training strategy is designed and evaluated to determine its usefulness in supplementing existing courses, work-based students or interns, and essentially to help fill the gap between engineering and technology schools and the technical workplace.


Patent
Indiana State University and The United States Of America | Date: 2015-04-24

The invention provides novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists, for example, phantasmidine and derivatives thereof, for example a compound of formula I. Also disclosed are methods of treating disorders responsive to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists such as Alzheimers disease, schizophrenia, Myasthenia Gravis, Tourettes syndrome, Parkinsons disease, epilepsy, pain, and cognitive dysfunction by treatment with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: PHYLOGENETIC SYSTEMATICS | Award Amount: 223.62K | Year: 2016

Animals have evolved a variety of chemicals defenses against predators. A premier example is the toxic chemicals in the skin of poison frogs. Because these frogs are brightly colored, predators such as birds and snakes learn to avoid them. These toxins are alkaloids, found in many animals and plants. The frogs acquire these chemical defenses by eating ants and other arthropods that contain the alkaloids. These frog alkaloids (e.g., tetrodotoxin, batrachotoxin) are pharmacologically important and cause muscle paralysis, and disrupt breathing and cardiac function. At the cellular level, alkaloids affect ion channels, which control the transmission of nerve impulses. Surprisingly, the ion channels of poison frogs are are not affected by their own toxins; thus, deciphering how this evolved has important broader impacts that translate to human health. This research will use evolutionary trees to guide the activities: fieldwork to acquire and characterize natural alkaloids and collect ecological data on the species, molecular evolution of ion channel resistance to alkaloids, and neurophysiological effects of alkaloids on ion channels. The research will provide opportunities for students from the University of Texas and Indiana State University to jointly participate in international fieldwork, acquire new skills in bioinformatics, molecular modeling, genomics, and neurophysiology, as well as promote interactions between the two universities.

The project will use Next-Generation DNA sequencing of transcriptomes, targeted sequencing of hundreds of genes, and bioinformatics methods to reconstruct evolutionary trees that will guide the research program with an experimental framework for explaining the origin of resistance, which has evolved multiple times in the poison frogs (family Dendrobatidae). Sequencing will also be used to identify novel amino acid replacements that may confer resistance to alkaloids. Computational modeling and in vitro assays of mutated ion channels will determine if these novel replacements provide resistance to natural and synthesized alkaloids. Fieldwork will focus on acquiring genetic samples, skin alkaloids, and color photographs from multiple populations of frogs, using natural history collection standards data collection and voucher specimens preparation. The combination of approaches will provide novel insights in the systematics of Dendrobatidae poison frogs, and also the evolution of auto-resistance to toxic alkaloids within the group.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: MAJOR RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION | Award Amount: 236.93K | Year: 2015

With this award from the Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) and Chemistry Research Instrumentation and Facilities (CRIF) programs, Indiana State University will acquire an ultra-high pressure liquid chromatograph interfaced with a linear ion trap mass spectrometer capable of data-dependent tandem mass spectrometery. The system will be used to separate and analyze the composition of mixtures of substances obtained from various sources including samples obtained from chemical reactions, energy-related research and batteries used for energy storage. In this instrument the liquid samples are allowed to pass through columns filled with substances that interact to various degrees with the sample components and thus the components move at different speeds through the columns. This process allows separation of the components. These species are then analyzed using the mass spectrometer in which the components are ionized and their masses are determined by measuring the mass to charge ratio (m/z) of the ions. This is a widely used analytical tool to determine the composition of a mixture or material. Students will be trained to use this modern instrumentation while working in their research, preparing them for their later careers. The instrument will enable new undergraduate laboratory and research experiences. It will also be used in the Summer Undergraduate Research Experiences (SURE) program which engages a large number of undergraduate students across the sciences. Besides serving multiple departments at ISU, it will support users from neighboring institutions including St. Mary-of-the-Woods College.

The instrument will be used in research especially in areas such as (a) isolating, synthesizing and structural elucidating neuroactive natural products; (b) analyzing multimodal signaling systems in sceloporus lizards; (c) correlating analysis of organics and volatile trace elements in carbonaceous chondrites; (d) carrying out cleavage analysis of plant and fungal tyrosinases; and (e) carrying out applications of gas-phase ion molecule chemistry.

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