Indian Space Research Organisation

Bangalore, India

Indian Space Research Organisation

Bangalore, India
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It has recently emerged that the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) is working on a plan to extract energy from the moon that will help India to cut down on its oil imports. The plan involves mining Helium-3 rich lunar dust, generating energy from it and sending it back to the Earth. The plans were first revealed in February by Dr Sivathanu Pillai, a professor at the space agency. He had then told a conference in New Delhi that the lunar dust mining programme is a priority for Isro, Livemint reported on Thursday (20 April). The space agency is also planning to brew beer using yeast on the Earth's natural satellite as part of an experiment to "test and observe the survivability of yeast in space and how it performs under Moon's gravity conditions", according to information shared by Jitendra Singh, India's minister of state in charge of atomic energy and space, in March during a parliamentary session. President Donald Trump-led administration in the US was also keen on extracting energy from the Moon. He had reportedly asked Nasa about mining the natural resources on the Moon for profit, to which, the space agency responded saying that they have already begun handing over low-Earth orbit explorations and tours to companies like SpaceX and Blue Origin. With the advancement in space technology in many countries across the world, there has been a surge in activities aimed at exploring the outer space and the natural resources of extra-terrestrial bodies, especially the Moon, given its close proximity to the Earth. Here is a look at the some interesting activities that space agencies (state-funded and private) aspire to do on Moon in the near future: You may be interested in:


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.bbc.co.uk

India has successfully launched a new communications satellite for South Asia from Sriharikota space centre. The satellite, funded entirely by India, is aimed at helping regional countries boost their telecommunication and broadcasting services. Sri Lanka, the Maldives, Bangladesh, Nepal and Bhutan will benefit from this satellite. But Pakistan has opted out from the initiative. In a tweet, Mr Modi congratulated the scientists on the launch, saying he was "very proud of them". The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) took three years to build the satellite, which was launched by its reliable Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV). The South Asia Satellite has 12 Ku band transponders which India's neighbours can use to improve their communications services. Each country will get access to at least one transponder, but they will have to develop their own ground infrastructure. The satellite is also capable of providing crucial communication links between the nations in times of natural disasters. Mr Modi has called this satellite an "invaluable gift" to India's neighbours. This "gift" from India has no parallels in the space-faring world. All other current regional consortia are commercial for-profit enterprises. So it seems Mr Modi is placing the ISRO in a new orbit by providing this space-based platform that would have cost the participating nations almost $1,500m (£1,158m). According to the government, the satellite will enable a full range of services to India's neighbours in telecommunication and broadcasting areas such as television, direct-to-home (DTH) services, education, telemedicine, weather forecasting and disaster management support. There is no doubt the country is actively trying to counter China's growing influence over its neighbours through this satellite. But in the 21st Century space race in Asia, China already has the first-mover advantage. A South Asia satellite will help the countries co-ordinate rescue efforts and have a secure line of communication during disasters.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

A new space mission record has been set by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) as it has successfully launched 104 satellites aboard a single rocket. On Wednesday, Feb. 15, ISRO launched the rocket from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre, which is in Andhra Pradesh. The single rocket ferrying the 104 satellites took off at 9:30 AM local time (11PM ET, Feb. 14). This is ISRO's first space mission for the year 2017, and the most complicated one it has ever carried out. The countdown for the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C37) flight started on Tuesday, Feb. 14, after it was given approval for a lift off. The PSLV-C37 included the Cartosat-2 series, 101 international nano satellites, as well as the INS-1A and INS-1B - two of its ISRO's nano satellites. All the 104 satellites were launched into space within 600 seconds, which means the rocket is traveling at a speed of about 27,000 kph, which is 40 times faster than the average speed of an airplane. The historic take-off makes India the first country to successfully launch all the 104 satellites at one go. ISRO also shared a tweet after the successful launch of the PSLV-C37. The PSLV, India's workhorse rocket, is on its thirty-ninth mission. Cartosat-2 series being the main satellite which weighs around 1574.1 lbs, along with the 103 co-passenger satellites which together weighs around 1463.9 lbs. Out of the co-passenger satellites, 96 are from the U.S. and the rest each are from ISRO's international customers like United Arab Emirates, Netherlands, Switzerland, Israel and Kazakhstan. Scientist at the ISRO have used the most powerful and heaviest rocket i.e. the XL variant, which was last used during the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) and during the Chandrayaan operation. The Indian Prime Minister expressed his heartiest gratitude on Twitter and also congratulated the team for overcoming all the challenges successfully. No other country has so far launched 104 satellites from a single rocket at one go, which makes the feat from ISRO so important. The previous record was held by the Russian Space Agency, which launched 37 satellites at one go. The main reason for the launch of the Cartosat satellite series is to ensure remote sensing services, and the images received from it will be highly beneficial for coastal land use and regulation, monitoring road networks and water distribution. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Onlookers watch the launch of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C37) at Sriharikota on Febuary 15, 2017 (AFP Photo/ARUN SANKAR) India successfully put a record 104 satellites from a single rocket into orbit on Wednesday in the latest triumph for its famously frugal space programme. Celebrations erupted among scientists at the southern spaceport of Sriharikota as the head of India's Space Research Organisation (ISRO) announced all the satellites had been ejected as planned. "My hearty congratulations to the ISRO team for this success," the agency's director Kiran Kumar told those gathered in an observatory to track the progress of the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV). Prime Minister Narendra Modi congratulated the scientists for achieving the feat which smashes a record previously held by Russia. "They have hit a century in space technology," Modi said at an election rally in northern Uttar Pradesh state. The rocket took off at 9:28am (0358 GMT) and cruised at a speed of 27,000 kilometres (16,777 miles) per hour, ejecting all the 104 satellites into orbit in around 30 minutes, according to ISRO. The rocket's main cargo was a 714 kilogram (1,574 pounds) satellite for Earth observation but it was also loaded with 103 smaller "nano satellites", weighing a combined 664 kilograms. The smallest weighed only 1.1 kilogram. Nearly all of the nano satellites are from other countries, including Israel, Kazakhstan, Switzerland and 96 from the United States. Eighty-eight of them are from Planet Inc - a San Francisco-based Earth imagery company - and weigh 4.5 kilogram each. Only three satellites belonged to India. Scientists sat transfixed as they watched the progress of the rocket on monitors until the last payload was ejected, and then began punching the air in triumph and hugging each other. This was PSLV's 39th successful mission, known as India's space workhorse. The launch means India now holds the record for launching the most satellites in one go, surpassing Russia which launched 39 satellites in a single mission in June 2014. And it is another feather in the cap for ISRO which sent an unmanned rocket to orbit Mars in 2013 at a cost of just $73 million, compared with NASA's Maven Mars mission which had a $671 million price tag. ISRO is also mulling the idea of missions to Jupiter and Venus. The business of putting commercial satellites into space for a fee is growing as phone, Internet and other companies, as well as countries, seek greater and more high-tech communications. India has carved out a reputation as a reliable low-cost option, relying in part on its famed skill of "jugaad" -- creating a cheap alternative solution. Experts say much of its credibility stems from India's successful launch of the Mars orbiter, which gave it an edge over its rivals in the space race. "India is proving to be a very viable option because of the cost and the reliability factor," said Ajay Lele, a senior fellow at the Delhi-based Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses. "India has been doing these launches successfully and has established itself as a very reliable player." Mathieu J Weiss, a liaison officer for France's CNES national space agency who is currently in India, said ISRO had pulled off a major feat. "It's a great technical challenge to launch so many satellites at once into orbit on the right trajectory so that they don't make contact with each other," he told AFP. Weiss said India had become a major player in the space race by making itself so competitive with its low costs and by working with private companies which are space specialists. "India has become a space power in its own right in recent years," he added. Last June, India set a national record after it successfully launched a rocket carrying 20 satellites, including 13 from the US. The 50-year-old space agency plans to send four more rockets into space later this year ahead of its second lunar mission Chandrayaan-2 slated for 2018. Modi has often hailed India's budget space technology, quipping in 2014 that a rocket that launched four foreign satellites into orbit had cost less to make than Hollywood film "Gravity".


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

There is an Asian surge in space programs. China and India are upping the ante on by hiking the space spending even as America's NASA and Russia's Roscosmos are having flat budgets. India increased space spending for 2017-2018 by more than 20 percent from $1.1 billion to $1.4 billion. One major milestone of China's space ventures in 2017 will be the launch of Tianzhou-1, the first cargo spacecraft which will be a litmus test of key technologies for China's upcoming space station. Carrying 13 tons, the cargo spacecraft will lift off in April. "The carrying capacity of Tianzhou-1 is designed based on the scale of the space station, on the principle of achieving the highest carrying capacity with the lowest structural weight," said Bai Mingsheng, Tianzhou-1's chief designer with China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation. China's cargo spacecraft is designed with a long-term plan. The Tianzhou-1 is also meant for refueling and resupplying the space station of China. Tianzhou-1 will dock with the orbiting Tiangong-2 space lab, which hosted two astronauts in 2016. The space ambitions of China gained traction in recent years. The year 2016 was eventful for CASC with the first successful docking of the Shenzhou-11 spacecraft with the Chinese space lab. China's permanent space station is expected to be ready by 2023. For 2017, CASC has set lunar sampling as a breakthrough plan with automated moon surface sampling, unmanned docking and moon take-off. "The development of Chang'e-5 has entered the end of its flight model phase, and relevant work is proceeding smoothly," says a statement from CASC. The lunar probe will have four parts: an orbiter, a returner, an ascender and a lander, said Ye Peijian, an aerospace expert. The Shenzhou-11 brought two astronauts safely to the Tiangong-2 and back to Earth. The CASC will also land a probe on the moon's far side by late 2018 with an aim for sending a probe to Mars by 2020, as a significant milestone in China's space exploration program. India's space agency, Indian Space Research Organisation, is hiking spending on space technology and space science under the belief that investing in space exploration will bring positive returns for the country. The agency is gearing up for two space science missions — one to Mars and another to Venus. According to media reports, India's "Mars Orbiter Mission II" may include a lander with a planned launch in 2021, while the Venus mission will be with an orbiter. In the Mars program, there is competition between China and India. India's space plans had a pronounced momentum in 2014 when it took the 13kg Orbiter Mission to Mars and tapped a stream of data and images. To slash the launch costs, India also began the use of flight tests of a reusable space plane. Meanwhile, ISRO set a world record on Feb. 15 by launching 104 satellites in a single mission from the space center at Sriharikota. The Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle carried a Cartosat-2 series satellite for earth observation along with 103 other satellites in one shot. The nano-satellites numbering 101 belong to five countries — the United States, Israel, Netherlands, Kazakhstan and Switzerland — alongside a few Indian nano-satellites. The feat has broken the record owned by Russia which launched 37 satellites in June 2014. B Jayakumar, mission director, said the focus was not about "creating records" but optimizing the capacity available on the PSLV which has a maximum payload capacity of 1,500 kilograms. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.huffingtonpost.com

NEW DELHI, Feb 15 (Reuters) - India successfully launched 104 satellites in a single mission on Wednesday, setting what its space agency says is a world record of launching the most satellites at one go. Of the 104, 101 are foreign satellites to serve international customers as the South Asian nation seeks a bigger share of the $300 billion global space industry. “This is a great moment for each and everyone of us. Today we have created history,” said project director B. Jayakumar. Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted his congratulations on the launch conducted by the state-run Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) that went off smoothly and was carried live on national TV news channels. This remarkable feat by @isro is yet another proud moment for our space scientific community and the nation. India salutes our scientists. — Narendra Modi (@narendramodi) February 15, 2017 Spoke to the Secretary, Department of Space and congratulated him & the entire team of scientists on today's exceptional achievement. — Narendra Modi (@narendramodi) February 15, 2017 “This remarkable feat by ISRO is yet another proud moment for our space scientific community and the nation,” he said. “India salutes our scientists.” Modi is bullish on India’s space program and has repeatedly praised the efforts of scientists who three years ago pulled off a low-cost mission to send a probe to orbit Mars that succeeded at the first attempt. ISRO’s low prices attracted international customers to launch 75 satellites last year from Sriharikota in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh. The launch of PSLV-C37 in a single payload, including the Cartosat-2 series and 103 co-passenger satellites, together weighed over 650 kg (1,433 lb) Out of 101 nano satellites, 96 were from the United States and one each from Israel, Kazakhstan, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Arab Emirates.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India successfully launched 104 satellites in a single mission on Wednesday, setting what its space agency says is a world record of launching the most satellites at one go. Of the 104, 101 are foreign satellites to serve international customers as the South Asian nation seeks a bigger share of the $300 billion global space industry. "This is a great moment for each and everyone of us. Today we have created history," said project director B. Jayakumar. Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted his congratulations on the launch conducted by the state-run Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) that went off smoothly and was carried live on national TV news channels. "This remarkable feat by ISRO is yet another proud moment for our space scientific community and the nation," he said. "India salutes our scientists." Modi is bullish on India's space program and has repeatedly praised the efforts of scientists who three years ago pulled off a low-cost mission to send a probe to orbit Mars that succeeded at the first attempt. ISRO's low prices attracted international customers to launch 75 satellites last year from Sriharikota in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh. The launch of PSLV-C37 in a single payload, including the Cartosat-2 series and 103 co-passenger satellites, together weighed over 650 kg (1,433 lb) Out of 101 nano satellites, 96 were from the United States and one each from Israel, Kazakhstan, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Arab Emirates.


Methods and system to control the data processing workflows in distributed environment with asynchronous message driven mechanism. A production workflow includes an ordered sequence of tasks to be executed that needs to be distributed on multiple computational nodes. Each task is assigned by a sender application to a receiver application running on a computational node through a message. On receiving the message, the receiver application sends and sends an acknowledgment to the message and schedules the sub tasks associated with the task. The sender application on receiving the acknowledgment removes the message from the queue otherwise the messages are stored in the database. On completion of the sub tasks the receiver application generates a message and the sender application on receipt of the message takes up the next task in the sequence and generates a message to another application. The sender application keeps on generating messages till all the tasks are completed in the sequence. The methods adopted in this invention provides persistence and guaranteed delivery of messages thereby improving the quality of service in transaction processing systems that are managing complex workflows.


A system and method for detecting and isolating faults in pressure ports (2) and pressure transducers (3) of a pressure sensing system are disclosed. The system comprises a set of pressure ports (2) flushed to a nose cap (1) of a space vehicle in crucifix form. Three pressure transducers (3) are connected to each pressure port (2) through pneumatic tubes (4) for measuring surface pressure from the pressure ports (2). Separate power supplying units (7, 8, 9) are connected to the three pressure transducers (3) for powering the pressure transducers (3) at each pressure port (2). A processing unit (10) is configured to acquire voltage inputs corresponding to the measured surface pressure from the pressure transducers (3). The processing unit (10) executes one or more levels of fault checking to detect and isolate pressure transducer failures and blockage of the pressure ports (2) based on the voltage inputs. Hence, it is possible to enhance the accuracy and reliability of the pressure estimation of the FADS. cushion pressure


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: phys.org

The project could help future space explorers create their own chemicals and drugs on demand, allowing them to maximise the efficiency of their launch payloads by taking raw chemical ingredients with them rather than specific medications. They could then use digital chemistry technology to make drugs and other materials as required.‌‌ A DIDO2 nano-satellite containing an experiment designed by Professor Lee Cronin, the University's Regius Chair of Chemistry, was one of 103 launched into space this morning on an Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) rocket. Professor Cronin and his research team developed the launch in partnership with SpacePharma, a company which specialises in providing scientists with access to microgravity environments.‌‌ The mission, part of the ISRO's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle programme, was successfully launched just before 4am GMT/ 9am local time at Sriharikota, around 80km from Chennai. The experiment is a continuation of previous research from the Cronin Group which aims to digitise chemistry and make it possible for chemical compounds of all kinds to be 'printed' on demand. During the experiment, the research team will remotely activate a microfluidic device inside the satellite which will bring together chemical agents. Using an onboard microscope, they will be able to watch the agents react, forming crystals of a drug currently being developed for use in as a possible anti-cancer treatment. Professor Cronin said: "This is a fantastic opportunity to literally take the Cronin Group's research to new heights. Low- and zero-gravity environments offer a wide range of new opportunities for science, and we're excited to see how this experiment progresses. "Imagine you are on living on Mars and you need access to a drug that you have not taken with you, this approach might allow you to use a digital blueprint and make the drug on demand from a minimal set of chemicals. "This collaboration is exciting since we are going to be able to do a digitally controlled chemical experiment in space that produces a complex organic molecule that is part of a class of anti-cancer drugs under study in my laboratory. We chose this molecule as it complex one-pot three step assembly and ends by producing the drug candidate in highly pure crystalline form." Yossi Yamin, founder and CEO of SpacePharma, said: "We are really excited that Professor Cronin is using our nano-satellite for his digital chemical experiments and we hope this will pave the way for developing chemistry in space including drug manufacturing and testing." Explore further: India to launch 103 satellites in record single mission

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