Lal Bahadur Nagar, India
Lal Bahadur Nagar, India

The Indian Institute of Foreign Trade is an autonomous public business school established in 1963 by the Government of India to help professionalize the country's foreign trade management and increase exports. Its flagship program is the Master of Business Administration in International Business . It is the only institute among the top-10 business schools of India that offers this program. Apart from the MBA Course, IIFT provides various Management Development Programs, Executive Programs and Certificate Programs catering to the requirements of aspiring International Business executives and mid-career professionals alike.IIFT is a deemed-university and it conducts an autonomous entrance examination across various centres in India. In 2014, an estimated whopping 60000 candidates took the entrance exam for Full Time MBA course with 260 seats, making it one of the toughest B-schools to get into in India. Wikipedia.


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Bhattacharyya R.,Indian Institute of Foreign Trade | Ganguly A.,Indian Institute of Foreign Trade
Energy Policy | Year: 2017

In India electricity price for agriculture is cross subsidized by the industries. The Indian government has started a process through which the extent of cross subsidization is gradually being reduced. The idea is to replace the cross subsidization by 2030 and introduce a rate structure that will increase with the amount of electricity usage. This paper uses the Computable General Equilibrium framework to evaluate the ex-ante impact of these policy changes on the Indian economy. The paper finds that removal of cross subsidies will increase inflation particularly food inflation resulting in a decline in household incomes more so in rural areas. Replacing cross subsidies with a progressive rate structure will compensate for only a small part of the negative effects of the removal of cross subsidies. Four other policy options are also investigated targeting household incomes, food inflation and general inflation. Most of these options do not work as the required increase in budget deficit is unlikely to be bearable to the government. The only feasible option appears to be a direct price subsidy to agricultural sector: in this case food prices are held down, inflation is moderate and effect on household incomes is minimal. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: INCO-2009-5.1 | Award Amount: 647.13K | Year: 2010

The main objective of the INDIA GATE project is to increase the S&T cooperation between India and the EU by creating a one-stop shop for funding opportunities that are available in India for European organisations. The INDIA GATE project will identify Indian research and innovation funding programmes, the obstacles that inhibit EU researchers and organizations from taking part in the identified opportunities and make the information available in a user-friendly manner to stimulate, encourage and facilitate participation. INDIA GATE project starts with a review of the available funding opportunities and an analysis of the obstacles facing European organisations wanting to take part in Indian funded projects. The information will support the development of effective dissemination tools to be used in the dissemination strategy. A dynamic webpage will be developed and serve as a one-stop shop for information on Indian programmes open for European organisations with all relevant information available both in webformat, e-training format and as downloadable material. Additionally, the participation rate will be monitored allowing to provide expert input to decision makers and the Joint Committee. INDIA GATE will bring EU-India scientific cooperation forward by an increased participation of European organisations in Indian funding programmes and contribute to an increased mutual understanding of EU-India respective research systems.


Seth A.,Punjabi University | Singla A.R.,Indian Institute of Foreign Trade | Aggarwal H.,Punjabi University
Communications in Computer and Information Science | Year: 2012

Analyst reports are confirming that adoption of SOA is growing; the actual goal of SOA is to help align IT capabilities with business goals. In today's competitive scenario where business demand changes very frequently, the expectation from technology is raised to level where we are expecting the business processes are developed in such a manner that they can adapt the frequent changes without affecting the overall organization business architecture. Thus the need to assume business processes as a smart services that can be loosely coupled. Thus need of service oriented architecture arises. This paper is a review of articles and research work that have undergone in the past 1 decade (i.e. from 2001 - 2011). The source of data is from most prestigious journal and website covering area of SOA, In this paper we have identified the factors that are relevant to SOA implementation and up to how much extents each factor is crucial to SOA implementation is also identified. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

Proud to Announce the Launch of GDS Group Proud to announce the launch of GDS Group, a global events, research and technology services company dedicated to helping clients meet the challenges posed by a fast-moving, disruptive business environment. GDS Group comprises of GDS Summits, GDS Digital and Meet the Boss brands. New York, NY, November 18, 2016 --( Its B2B summits and events bring purchaser and provider communities together to find solutions to real-world business challenges. Meanwhile the offered technology services provide connectivity solutions that enable organisations to take advantage of the digital revolution. The secret sauce? GDS’s customised intelligence solutions, aligned with decades of experience in facilitating results-oriented business conversations. The GDS journey started back in 1993, when GDS Group Chairman Spencer Green opened the doors on what was then known as GDS Publishing to specialise in industrial, government-led publications for the burgeoning Chinese market. It then launched over 40 business-to-business titles, were name-checked alongside Tony Blair on China’s national news as ‘best for Chinese business’ and – following a move into India – deemed to be ‘of national importance’ by the Indian Institute of Foreign Trade. Praise indeed. From there GDS expanded into live events and, with the launch of our first conference – Enterprise China, in 1998 – GDS Publishing became GDS International. The hugely successful ‘Enterprise’ series of conferences was rolled out across China and Latin America over the next two years, and opened our eyes to the power of B2B networking. It proved to be a watershed moment. In 2000, GDS International launched its first senior executive summit under the ‘Next Generation’ banner, which became the catalyst for a decade-and-a-half of rapid growth and a portfolio of hugely successful products. During this period, the company moved out of the print publishing business but also launched a virtual meeting and content hub, MeetTheBoss.tv, which further expanded its reach and product offerings into the online space. Earlier this year, in order to reflect the increasingly diverse nature of our business, GDS underwent a further rebrand to become GDS Group. But while the name has changed, the core aim remains the same as it did all those years ago: to provide clients with the intelligence they need to make better business decisions. It’s been a fantastic journey, but the best is still to come. About GDS Group GDS Group comprises of GDS Summits, GDS Digital and Meet the Boss brands GDS Summits GDS Summits are world-leading B2B events that provide the ability to network and learn from industry peers and solution providers about how they are approaching common challenges and opportunities. GDS Digital GDS Digital delivers secure, super-fast broadband to remote, vulnerable and low-income locations, offering people the opportunity to transform the way they engage and interact with local authorities. Meet the Boss Meet the Boss events and roundtables are designed to give executives an opportunity to have meaningful conversations about best practices, challenges and common experiences, providing opportunities to meet, talk and find solutions. New York, NY, November 18, 2016 --( PR.com )-- GDS Group is a global events, research and technology services company dedicated to helping clients meet the challenges posed by a fast-moving, disruptive business environment.Its B2B summits and events bring purchaser and provider communities together to find solutions to real-world business challenges. Meanwhile the offered technology services provide connectivity solutions that enable organisations to take advantage of the digital revolution. The secret sauce? GDS’s customised intelligence solutions, aligned with decades of experience in facilitating results-oriented business conversations.The GDS journey started back in 1993, when GDS Group Chairman Spencer Green opened the doors on what was then known as GDS Publishing to specialise in industrial, government-led publications for the burgeoning Chinese market. It then launched over 40 business-to-business titles, were name-checked alongside Tony Blair on China’s national news as ‘best for Chinese business’ and – following a move into India – deemed to be ‘of national importance’ by the Indian Institute of Foreign Trade. Praise indeed.From there GDS expanded into live events and, with the launch of our first conference – Enterprise China, in 1998 – GDS Publishing became GDS International. The hugely successful ‘Enterprise’ series of conferences was rolled out across China and Latin America over the next two years, and opened our eyes to the power of B2B networking.It proved to be a watershed moment. In 2000, GDS International launched its first senior executive summit under the ‘Next Generation’ banner, which became the catalyst for a decade-and-a-half of rapid growth and a portfolio of hugely successful products. During this period, the company moved out of the print publishing business but also launched a virtual meeting and content hub, MeetTheBoss.tv, which further expanded its reach and product offerings into the online space.Earlier this year, in order to reflect the increasingly diverse nature of our business, GDS underwent a further rebrand to become GDS Group. But while the name has changed, the core aim remains the same as it did all those years ago: to provide clients with the intelligence they need to make better business decisions. It’s been a fantastic journey, but the best is still to come.About GDS GroupGDS Group comprises of GDS Summits, GDS Digital and Meet the Boss brandsGDS SummitsGDS Summits are world-leading B2B events that provide the ability to network and learn from industry peers and solution providers about how they are approaching common challenges and opportunities.GDS DigitalGDS Digital delivers secure, super-fast broadband to remote, vulnerable and low-income locations, offering people the opportunity to transform the way they engage and interact with local authorities.Meet the BossMeet the Boss events and roundtables are designed to give executives an opportunity to have meaningful conversations about best practices, challenges and common experiences, providing opportunities to meet, talk and find solutions. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from GDS Group


Singh R.K.,Indian Institute of Foreign Trade | Kumar R.,Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology | Shankar R.,Indian Institute of Technology Delhi
International Journal of Manufacturing Research | Year: 2012

Supply Chain Management (SCM) has become an integral part of strategy for all organisations irrespective of their size and sector in the present globalised and networked economy. This study is on analysing implementation of SCM and its effectiveness in a medium-scale construction organisation. A Situation-Actor-Process (SAP)-Learning-Action-Performance (LAP) framework has been applied to analyse the various issues of SCM in this organisation. Based on SAP analysis, suitable actions are taken for improving performance of the organisation. The study has also tried to develop a framework for evaluating effectiveness of SCM in a given organisation. Based on this study, it is recommended that to improve effectiveness of Construction Supply Chains (CSC), organisations should focus on product customisation, waste reduction, housekeeping and IT applications to reduce time lag in various processes. Copyright © 2012 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.


Singh R.K.,Indian Institute of Foreign Trade | Sharma M.K.,Mbm Engineering College
Production Planning and Control | Year: 2014

In the era of globalisation, requirements of customer are changing very fast. Product life cycle is shortening. Organisations are under pressure to reduce cost, delivery time, improve reliability of product by changing their process continuously. Supply chain management has become integral part of strategy for most of the organisations in meeting these challenges. Success of supply chain depends on effective strategy for improving coordination among the members to make it more responsive for market needs by optimising available resources. In this context, supply chain needs to be flexible. Based on the literature, it is observed that overall flexibility of supply chain depends upon suppliers flexibility, manufacturing flexibility and customers flexibility. Other sub-factors affecting flexibility may be product and process design, capacity planning, logistic management, suppliers capabilities and nature of customers. This study has tried to prioritise flexibility alternatives by analytical network process approach. Input for this analysis is based on four Indian case studies, which are briefly described in the paper. These organisations had been very active in improving flexibility of their supply chains. Findings of the study report that organisations should give top priority for improving manufacturing flexibility followed by customers and suppliers flexibility. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.


Bhattacharyya R.,Indian Institute of Foreign Trade | Ghoshal T.,Bureau of Applied Economics and Statistics
Environment, Development and Sustainability | Year: 2010

This article considers a planner's optimum control exercise with environmental pollution and derives a testable link between the growth rates of consumption and pollution. The link is then empirically estimated for the case of CO2 emissions for a sample consisting of the union of top 25 countries in terms of CO2 emissions, population and per capita GNP. The analysis suggests that the interrelationship between the growth rates of CO2 emission and economic development is mostly significant for countries that have a high level of CO2 emissions and population. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.


Banerjee S.,Indian Institute of Foreign Trade | Dash S.K.,MSD Pharmaceutical Private Ltd
International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing | Year: 2011

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to unearth the factors influencing the scope and acceptability of E-detailing concepts recently started by domestic as well as multinational companies in India. Design/methodology/approach: The objective is to capture views of pharmaceutical company personnel about E-detailing to understand factors influencing acceptance and execution of E-detailing as a marketing communication tool. This study is based on primary data collected from the Delhi/NCR area of India. To analyze the data, an attempt is made to identify latent factors that influence various measurable characteristics. Gonzalez and Bello's approach is used in factor analyzing the responses to identify prominent influencing factors behind the adoption of E-detailing by pharmaceutical companies. Findings: As viewed by the company personnel, managerial readiness, operational capabilities, audience acceptance and market accessibility are the most important factors responsible for proper acceptability of E-detailing program. Other motivators are convenience mode of communication, brand acceptance in the market, a deep relationship development with target physicians. This has a positive impact on the profit curve of the companies. Practical implications: Results from this study will help pharmaceutical companies operating in India to understand factors influencing scope and acceptability of E-detailing as an important marketing communication tool. Pharmaceutical companies may chart their strategic communication roadmap in line with the same. Originality/value: In this paper, we have identified factors responsible for acceptance and execution of E-detailing as a pharmaceutical marketing communication tool. These factors may be tested in different countries and intensity may be analyzed beyond country boundaries. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.


Bhatia S.,Indian Institute of Foreign Trade
IMSCI 2011 - 5th International Multi-Conference on Society, Cybernetics and Informatics, Proceedings | Year: 2011

E-phannacy is presently more prominent in developed countries which have put in place a comprehensive regulatory framework and an enabling environment including provision for necessary financial incentives. The goal of e-phannacy, other than to improve patient care and safety, has also been to reduce racial and ethnic disparities. Developing countries, though, have to work even on improving accessibility of pharmacies for their citizens. A focus on e-phannacy can provide the answer if necessary prior conditions are complied with.


Banerjee S.,Indian Institute of Foreign Trade | Dash S.K.,Merck And Co.
Journal of Medical Marketing | Year: 2011

Detailing in pharmaceutical industry is defined as the process of communicating the pharmaceutical product message to health care professionals (HCPs, primarily clinicians). In reality, for pharma representative, actual detailing lasts for only few minutes, but the preparation and waiting time is very long. As a result, there is an increasing trend of using interactive e-detailing, video e-detailing and other physicians' online forums. Edetailing is one of such selling process recently adopted by pharmaceutical companies in India for communicating product messages to the HCPs. As this is a new way of communication, not much is known about the views of physicians about E-detailing. In this backdrop, the purpose of this study is to analyze the scope and acceptability of e-detailing concepts recently started by domestic as well as multinational pharmaceutical companies in India. The objective of the article is to understand the role of different demographic, social, and behavioral variables behind acceptability of e-detailing by physicians of India. The result from ordered probit estimation reveals that the professional service representative (PSR) visit, invitation, and detailing type have a positive impact on the probability of acceptance of e-detailing. Moreover, it can be seen that marginal increase in the PSR visit, invitation, and detailing type increases the probabilities of e-detailing acceptability among physicians. One can see that, in India, physicians consider e-detailing as more of complimentary in nature to ensure a holistic effect of pharmaceutical marketing communication. © The Author(s) 2011.

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