Indian Health Service

Northampton, MA, United States

Indian Health Service

Northampton, MA, United States
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Receive press releases from MedAware Systems, Inc.: By Email Broomfield, CO, May 03, 2017 --( Dr. Piland is a recognized authority in healthcare economics and research, Dr. Piland is Research Professor, Emeritus, Institute of Rural Health, Idaho State University. He also served as Director of the Institute for thirteen years. Dr. Piland brings over forty-five years of experience in health services research, health care financing, and healthcare economics. Prior to his tenure at Idaho State University, he served as Director of the Medical Group Management Center for Research; was founding director of the Lovelace Medical Foundation’s Institute for Health and Population Research. He also served as Health Economist and Assistant Manager of Health Services Research at Stanford Research Institute (now SRI International). Dr. Piland held senior administrative and faculty positions at the Colorado Health Institute; the University of Colorado School of Medicine; the University of New Mexico School of Medicine; the University of Denver; the San Diego Veterans Administration Medical Center; and the Veterans Medical Research Foundation. He served as Principal Investigator on more than 30 major health services research projects and published over 100 scientific and health policy related articles and book chapters and has coauthored four books. He holds numerous awards, including the Indian Health Service (USDHHS) Director Award; Professional Leadership Award from the American Lung Association; Scientific Research Award from the Lovelace Medical Foundation; and a United States Public Health Service Training Fellowship, among others. “We are honored to have Dr. Piland join our Scientific Advisory Board” said Founder and Chief Science Officer, Dr. Zung Vu Tran. He adds, “Dr. Piland brings a wealth of knowledge and experience in healthcare economics and research that will add critical economic data components that are highly valuable to our customers.” About MedAware Systems, Inc. MedAware Systems, Inc. disrupts the health informatics industry by forever changing the way Pharma and medical device companies, physicians, payers and consumers derive usable evidence from published clinical trials research. The Company’s Science of Health Informatics (SOHInfo™) is a Scientific-Data-as-a-Service (SDaaS™) solving the problem of making the vast and chaotic body of human clinical trials research instantly available and indispensable in understanding medical treatment safety and efficacy. SOHInfo organizes and standardizes data from all human clinical trials and provides immediate and actionable information on evidence-based medical treatments and outcomes. Broomfield, CO, May 03, 2017 --( PR.com )-- MedAware Systems, Inc. announced today that Dr. Neill Piland is joining the Company’s Scientific Advisory Board.Dr. Piland is a recognized authority in healthcare economics and research, Dr. Piland is Research Professor, Emeritus, Institute of Rural Health, Idaho State University. He also served as Director of the Institute for thirteen years.Dr. Piland brings over forty-five years of experience in health services research, health care financing, and healthcare economics. Prior to his tenure at Idaho State University, he served as Director of the Medical Group Management Center for Research; was founding director of the Lovelace Medical Foundation’s Institute for Health and Population Research. He also served as Health Economist and Assistant Manager of Health Services Research at Stanford Research Institute (now SRI International). Dr. Piland held senior administrative and faculty positions at the Colorado Health Institute; the University of Colorado School of Medicine; the University of New Mexico School of Medicine; the University of Denver; the San Diego Veterans Administration Medical Center; and the Veterans Medical Research Foundation.He served as Principal Investigator on more than 30 major health services research projects and published over 100 scientific and health policy related articles and book chapters and has coauthored four books. He holds numerous awards, including the Indian Health Service (USDHHS) Director Award; Professional Leadership Award from the American Lung Association; Scientific Research Award from the Lovelace Medical Foundation; and a United States Public Health Service Training Fellowship, among others.“We are honored to have Dr. Piland join our Scientific Advisory Board” said Founder and Chief Science Officer, Dr. Zung Vu Tran. He adds, “Dr. Piland brings a wealth of knowledge and experience in healthcare economics and research that will add critical economic data components that are highly valuable to our customers.”About MedAware Systems, Inc.MedAware Systems, Inc. disrupts the health informatics industry by forever changing the way Pharma and medical device companies, physicians, payers and consumers derive usable evidence from published clinical trials research. The Company’s Science of Health Informatics (SOHInfo™) is a Scientific-Data-as-a-Service (SDaaS™) solving the problem of making the vast and chaotic body of human clinical trials research instantly available and indispensable in understanding medical treatment safety and efficacy. SOHInfo organizes and standardizes data from all human clinical trials and provides immediate and actionable information on evidence-based medical treatments and outcomes. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from MedAware Systems, Inc.


News Article | May 27, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

Two Sisters Try To Tackle Drug Use At A Montana Indian Reservation There's a narrative about the methamphetamine epidemic in Montana that says the state tackled it in the 2000s, yet now it's back with a vengeance because of super labs and drug cartels in Mexico. But here on the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation, it never really went away. "Getting high in your car in front of the store; that ain't a big deal," says Miranda Kirk. Kirk works on the reservation, which is about 40 miles south of the Canadian border. She says no one even bothers to hide their drug use. "Leaving your paraphernalia out in the open for someone to walk in, that's alright. Having and seeing needles everywhere, that's ok. Even talking about selling your needles — that's normal too," Kirk says. Kirk is a 27-year-old mother of four. Born and raised in Fort Belknap, home to the Aaniiih and Nakoda tribes, she grew up around drugs, alcohol and addiction. She struggled with opioids after a miscarriage landed her in the ER and she was discharged with a handful of prescriptions. But, she says, with the help of her church, she broke that addiction. Now, she wants to help others. According to the Tribal Epidemiology Centers of the Indian Health Service, dependence on methamphetamine and other psychostimulants more than tripled for tribal members in Montana and Wyoming between 2011 and 2015. "People are saying they're seeing it as young as third grade, because, 'Oh that's ok, I see that at home — my aunt does this, my mom does this, my dad does this, my grandpa does this.' So, they can't see the error in it. Or they don't see it as a risk," says Kirk. Miranda Kirk and her sister, Charmayne Healy, felt like everyone had given up trying to do anything about the rampant drug use. And, they worried about their kids falling into the same trap. So they went to tribal leaders last year and said someone needs to do something — now. George Horse Capture, Jr., vice president of the Fort Belknap Tribal Council, helped the sisters persuade the council to declare a state of emergency against methamphetamine last January. Tribal leaders then gave Kirk and Healy $150,000 to fund a substance-abuse prevention and treatment program. The sisters were caught off guard, but right away, Kirk started hunting for a model that might work with the strengths of Fort Belknap. She heard about something called peer recovery, a movement centered on the idea that people who have succeeded in conquering their own addictions are uniquely equipped to coach others. "The light bulb came on," Kirk says. "That works, because what got me clean, in a sense, were peer mentors. They've been there. That made it easier for me to be able to express myself and not feel judged, or condemned. Like I'm a horrible person for what I was going through." She's determined to break the stigma attached to reaching out for help. In early 2016, Kirk and her sister officially launched the Aaniiih Nakoda Anti-Drug Movement, a native-led peer recovery project. Jessica Healy, 30, came knocking before they were even up and running. Her only son was taken away last year. "They helped me. And it took a big step ... it took all that I had," Jessica Healy says. She had been using drugs on and off since the age of 18. Once a week, one of Kirk's peer recovery groups, the Life Givers Circle, meets at the Lodge Pole Elementary school. "We talk about stuff and we make ribbon skirts, [do] activities, and we just help each other out," Jessica Healy says. It's one of about four peer support groups that Kirk and Charmayne Healy have helped start, both on and off the reservation. "It was a good feeling to be clean and to be close to people that had been going through the same thing. To know that there are others out there," Jessica Healy says. In addition to peer meetings, Aaniiih Nakoda members go to schools and talk to kids about prevention. They help organize events like zombie walks, in which people pretend to be the drug-addled walking dead. There's only one outpatient drug treatment facility in Fort Belknap, and no emergency housing or sober-living facilities. The only longer-term support available is Kirk's group. Dr. Aaron Wernham, of the Montana Healthcare Foundation, says that what Montana needs is a more integrated, team-based approach to treating addiction. That means primary care doctors working next to behavioral health professionals, and coordinating care all along the way. "Peer recovery fits in very well with it, but if you decided you were just going to build a whole treatment system around peer recovery, you probably wouldn't end up getting the results you want," he says. A new state law enacted in March goes a long way toward recognizing peer support specialists as legitimate members of a treatment team. The law sets clear professional standards, and paves the way for billing insurance companies and, potentially, Medicaid. The challenge is how to bring that comprehensive care to Fort Belknap. Until that happens, the sisters' grassroots peer program is one of the only options available for people. And she's intent on doing that work, no matter what. "You have to keep your phone on during the night because addiction don't sleep and normally we don't either," she says. This story is part of a reporting partnership with NPR, Montana Public Radio and Kaiser Health News.


CHICKASHA, Okla. & ASHBURN, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Indigenous Technologies, a DNI (Delaware Nation Industries) company, and Telos® Corporation today announced they have been selected by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to operate the Indian Health Service (IHS) network that serves American Indians and Alaska Natives across federally-recognized tribes within the United States. Indigenous Technologies is a Native 8(a) company that provides IT services and solutions and Telos is a leading provider of continuous security solutions and services for the world’s most security-conscious organizations. The Indigenous Technologies-Telos team will host infrastructure engineering and operations services at Telos’ secure operations facility in Las Vegas, NV. The team will manage and maintain the existing network functionality and design as a distributed electronic health care information system that securely exchanges patient information within its network and with other health care providers. It will also implement and support new network technology. IHS is an agency within HHS that is responsible for providing federal health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives. The provision of health services to members of federally-recognized tribes grew out of the special government-to-government relationship between the federal government and Indian tribes. IHS is the principal federal health care provider and health advocate for Indian people that serves approximately 2.2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives who belong to 567 federally recognized tribes in 35 states. “As a tribally-owned company, we are very proud to select Telos as our partner to deliver valuable services in support of the Indian Health Service,” said Jason Pruner, CEO of Indigenous Technologies. “Telos’ capabilities and services are proven across the federal government, and we couldn’t ask for a better partner to deliver critical services to our nation’s tribal members, including those of our own Delaware Nation.” “We are deeply honored to support our Native American communities, and expand our partnership with Indigenous Technologies to deliver services in the healthcare market,” said John Wood, chairman and CEO of Telos Corporation. Indigenous Technologies LLC is a Native 8(a) company that provides IT Services and Solutions. Indigenous Technologies is committed to providing solutions to meet customer’s needs. Indigenous Technologies is a team oriented company and provides excellent customer service with the goal of exceeding customer’s expectations. Indigenous Technologies’ vision will always focus on being respectful, providing a solution and developing a relationship, while increasing efficiency and business profitability. For more information, visit www.indigenousit.com. Telos Corporation empowers and protects the world’s most security-conscious organizations with solutions and services for continuous security assurance of individuals, systems and information. Telos’ offerings include cyber security solutions and services for IT risk management and information security; secure mobility to protect globally connected organizations; and identity management to establish trust in personnel and continuously monitor for insider threats. The company serves military, intelligence and civilian agencies of the federal government, allied nations and commercial organizations around the world. For more information, visit www.telos.com and follow on Twitter @TelosNews.


TAHLEQUAH, Okla., Feb. 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- After several years of planning and negotiation with the federal government, the Cherokee Nation officially begins construction on the tribe's new 469,000-square-foot health facility. Hundreds turned out for a groundbreaking ceremony on Friday, including representatives from state, federal and tribal governments. When completed in 2019, it will be the largest health center of any tribe in the country. The new outpatient and primary care facility is being built next to the existing W.W. Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah. The four-story facility will feature 180 exam rooms; access to an MRI machine; 10 new cardiac, lung and kidney specialists, and, for the first time ever, an ambulatory surgery center. "This is a monumental day for the Cherokee Nation, and within just a couple of years, this state-of-the-art facility will be transformative in the lives of our citizens in northeast Oklahoma," said Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker. "The Cherokee Nation has broken barriers in health care throughout Indian Country for years, and with the addition of the new facility and new services that will come with this facility, we will be pioneers in health care recognized throughout the entire nation." The facility is the outcome of the largest IHS-joint venture agreement ever between a tribe and the federal government. The Cherokee Nation is paying for the $200 million construction of the health center, while Indian Health Service has agreed to pay an estimated $80 million or more per year for at least 20 years for staffing and operation costs. Chief Baker testified before a congressional subcommittee in Washington, D.C., in 2014, advocating for the reopening of the joint venture application process so tribes could invest in health care infrastructure without straining the finances of the federal government. In 2015, Cherokee Nation was among few tribes selected for joint venture projects. When W.W. Hastings Hospital was built in Tahlequah in 1986, it was built for 100,000 patient visits per year. In 2016, Hastings saw nearly 400,000 patient visits and had to refer many patients out of the system for specialty services. "We are in dire need of an additional building on campus, since our current Hastings facility sees four times as many annual visits as it was constructed to host," said Cherokee Nation Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. "After more than 30 years of utilizing and maximizing that space, it's fulfilling to know that once complete it will be a major advancement in our ability to deliver the kinds of health care services our people want and deserve." The new facility will feature five surgical suites and two endoscopy suites inside its ambulatory surgical center. It will house a specialty clinic and feature 33 dental chairs, six eye exam rooms, three audiology testing booths and diagnostic imagining. It also expands space for several other services currently offered such as rehabilitation services, behavioral health, a wellness center and more.   "This top-rate facility will allow us to offer a level of health care and increased access to services in northeastern Oklahoma that weren't even thought possible before," said Cherokee Nation Health Services Executive Director Connie Davis. "On behalf of the Cherokee Nation Health Services staff, I thank Chief Baker, the Tribal Council and Cherokee Nation Businesses for giving us the opportunity to deliver first-class health care to our patients." In 2013, the tribe pledged for the first time to use $100 million from Cherokee Nation Businesses' casino profits to improve the Cherokee Nation's health care infrastructure. The funds expanded the Stilwell and Sallisaw health centers, built new health centers in Ochelata and Jay, and will be used for the new outpatient facility at Hastings. The original W.W. Hastings building will serve as the tribe's in-patient hospital. "The Cherokee Nation has never been more prosperous in its history, and with that prosperity we have invested in services that are a top priority for our people," said Cherokee Nation Tribal Council Speaker Joe Byrd. "That effort is evident in this new, state-of-the-art health facility. Our government and business officials have been diligent in managing and growing our resources, and our citizens today and future generations will reap the benefits of the work done by those officials." Childers Architects and HKS Architects are designing the LEED-certified facility, with Flintco serving as the construction manager while teaming with Cooper Construction. About 350 construction jobs and more than 850 new health jobs over time will be created from the project. Photo Cutline: Photo Cutline: (L to R) Cherokee Nation Businesses Board Member Gary Cooper, CEO Shawn Slaton, Cherokee Nation Health Services Deputy Executive Director Charles Grim, Indian Health Service Deputy Director of Field Operations Rear Adm. Kevin Meeks, Tribal Councilors Keith Austin and Janees Taylor, Health Services Executive Director Connie Davis, Chickasaw Nation Lt. Governor Jefferson Keel, Cherokee Nation Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr., Treasurer Lacey Horn, Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Principal Chief Bill John Baker, Tribal Council Speaker Joe Byrd, Tribal Council Deputy Speaker Victoria Vazquez, Tribal council Secretary Frankie Hargis, Tribal Councilors Rex Jordan, David Walkingstick, and Bryan Warner, Cherokee Spiritual Leader Crosslin Smith, Tribal Councilors Dick Lay and Harley Buzzard, CNB Board Members Dan Carter and Jerry Holderby, CNB Executive Vice President Chuck Garrett, Little Cherokee Ambassador Emma Fields, Jr. Lauryn Skye McCoy, Little Cherokee Ambassador Reese Henson, Miss Cherokee Sky Wildcat, W.W. Hastings Hospital CEO Brian Hail, Dr. James Stallcup and Dr. Stephen Jones   Photo Cutline: Rendering of the entrance of the new 469,000-square-foot outpatient health center to be built on the W.W. Hastings campus in Tahlequah.   About Cherokee Nation The Cherokee Nation is the federally recognized government of the Cherokee people and has inherent sovereign status recognized by treaty and law. The seat of tribal government is the W.W. Keeler Complex near Tahlequah, Oklahoma, the capital of the Cherokee Nation. With more than 340,000 citizens, 11,000 employees and a variety of tribal enterprises ranging from aerospace and defense contracts to entertainment venues, Cherokee Nation is one of the largest employers in northeastern Oklahoma and the largest tribal nation in the United States. To learn more, please visit www.cherokee.org. Editor's note: Find all the latest Cherokee Nation news at www.anadisgoi.com. Photos accompanying this release are available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42199 http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=42200


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Cytta is pleased announce that it is in the final stages of consummating a business development alliance with long standing Native American government systems integrator, Yona Systems Group Inc.  Yona will be implementing Cytta’s VeriSmartPhone™ based remote medical monitoring EvrCare™ technology as a foundational component within Yona’s Native American Health Initiative (NAHI) which includes participation by the US Government and select technology providers. Mr. Jim Metcalf, President of Yona said, “We see an excellent immediate 'fit' within our positioning at the Department of Interior, and the Department of Health and Human Services as focused within the Indian Health Service. There are 160+ existing hospitals, and remote clinics, which need more than hospital information systems.  They need enhanced patient outreach resources and Cytta provides a vital component of our integrated offering.” NAHI will be implemented via Yona Medical Systems, led by Dan Retter, who is also CEO of Yona Systems Group. He noted, “We recognize the ‘extra hardships’ faced by Native American patients who must travel long distances to receive monitoring of vital signs such as blood pressure, pulse, oxygen levels and blood glucose. We believe that patient Quality of Service will be greatly enhanced by the Cytta/Doctor Directed technology implemented on smart phones. Patients and their Health care team will receive more timely and actionable patient information with much less patient travel.” Yona has a unique 'Dual Designation" of being Certified by the Small Business Administration as a minority-owned, '8a'-Native American U.S. Government Systems Integrator. Yona also is designated, under the Buy Indian Act, as being an ISBEE (Indian Small Business Economic Enterprise). Mr. Jerry Smith, Co-CEO of Cytta stated, “Yona’s unique combination of designations is relatively rare and provides multiple exciting opportunities to utilize the Cytta VeriSmartPhone™ based technology and the EvrCare™ platforms to significantly improve healthcare services within the Native American community.” Currently 229 of the 566 reservations spread across the nation are in remote areas only accessible by airplane or boat. Seeing a doctor for one visit, let alone a follow-up, therefore becomes inconvenient and costly.  The Cytta/Doctor Direct remote monitoring mobile technology can bring modern medical care, supervised by a healthcare professional, to all rural communities, without the necessity of travelling miles to a clinic or physician’s office. Cytta Corp. has developed an IoT remote monitoring connectivity system and is known for its Cytta Connect open source WiFi, cellular and satellite VeriSmartPhone™ platform, a highly scalable and secure IoT two-way real time monitoring solution called EvrCare™. The Cytta VeriSmartPhone™ technology consists of an ‘intelligent’ android smartphone reprogrammed at the operating system level as an IoT control interface. This reprogrammed very smart device automatically connects all Bluetooth remote medical monitoring devices to the Oracle Cloud/IoT Platform, and from there to the designated recipients, creating two-way real time data, video and voice communication. The Cytta Connect technology automatically connects all remote monitoring devices to Oracle’s Cloud/IoT platform creating real time communication for all IoT market segments The Doctor Direct or ‘doctor directed’ model is Cytta’s initial, high risk, patient remote monitoring market offering.  The technology is a Physician prescribable model for patients with two or more identified morbidities. It is now complete, live patient tested in clinical trials, and has been field deployed. The Doctor Direct segment of the EvrCare™ system is completely open source – Automatically connects any Bluetooth health or wellness devices (i.e. blood pressure, blood glucose, pulse oxygen, digital scale, etc.) to the VeriSmartPhoneTM to the Oracle IoT/Cloud and on to the caregivers anywhere, and anytime. Data is automatically received by VeriSmartPhoneTM, interpreted, assessed and recipients determined.  VeriSmartPhoneTM transmits data in real time to the Dr., Nurse, Caregiver and/or family member along with determination of action level or importance.  Dr., Nurse, Caregiver, or family member responds to patient via voice, video, SMS or email in real-time through a VeriSmartPhoneTM in the patient’s home. The Doctor Direct remote patient monitoring system, combined with the new billing/CPT codes for the service, has created the opportunity for real-time patient monitoring and a significant revenue stream to the Physician for providing better quality care. Statements included in this press release, which are not historical in nature, are forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Statements relating to the future performance of the Company are subject to many factors including, but not limited to, the customer acceptance of the products in the market, the introduction of competitive products and product development, the impact of any product liability or other adverse litigation, working capital and availability of capital, commercialization and technological difficulties, the impact of actions and events involving key customers, vendors, lenders, competitors, and other risks. Such statements are based upon the current beliefs and expectations of the Company's management and are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. Actual results may differ from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. When used in this press release, the terms "anticipate", "believe", "estimate", "expect", "may", "objective", "plan", "possible", "potential", "project", "will", and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are made as of the date hereof, and we do not undertake any obligation to update any forward looking statements, whether as a result of future events, new information, or otherwise.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CARLSBAD, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--ChartLogic, a division of Medsphere Systems Corporation, today announced the release of Connect Patient, a multifunction patient portal and communications platform. Using the Connect Patient solution on any device or browser, practices, physicians and patients can easily and rapidly engage to enhance the overall patient experience and improve the quality of care by making the patient a more active participant in their own care. Moving beyond the typical patient portal experience, patient-centric Connect Patient is integrated with ChartLogic EHR to make patient information more readily available and increase communication between clinician and patient. With Connect Patient tools, practices and patients are empowered to control how they engage in terms of scheduling appointments, creating mobile intake forms, accepting payments online, sending secure messages, using SMS/email/voice technologies as appointment reminders and more. Medsphere is also using Connect Patient development to enhance the company’s OpenVista EHR and for work on other VA VistA environments. From a desktop computer, laptop or any mobile device, Connect Patient gives patients broader access to both clinicians and clinical information. Patients can use the platform to request prescription refills, pay bills online, see lab results and set up representatives authorized to access their account for them. “As healthcare moves to a more engaged patient care model, ChartLogic is providing the tools necessary to realize that goal,” said ChartLogic President Zubin Emsley. “Connect Patient substantially narrows the communications gap between patient and clinician and makes clinical information available much more quickly, addressing patient anxiety over potentially troubling health issues. Importantly, Connect Patient is just the first of several system enhancements ChartLogic is currently making to create a comprehensive, integrated ambulatory care solution that meets and exceeds required regulations.” With the release of the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) this year, and with more demanding and potentially rewarding standards coming online in 2018, practices can solidify their financial foundations now by implementing a certified EHR that includes a robust patient portal system. Connect Patient was built with these new requirements in mind and empowers practices to earn incentives and avoid penalties. Learn how Connect Patient increases the overall value of a practice and improves quality of care by visiting http://www.chartlogic.com/connectpatient/. Founded in 2002 and based in Carlsbad, Calif., Medsphere Systems Corporation is an organization of committed clinical and technology professionals working to make quality healthcare IT solutions accessible to organizations of virtually any size, shape or budget. Medsphere’s OpenVista® is an acute and inpatient behavioral health-oriented portfolio of clinical products and services that leverages the VistA electronic health record (EHR) system developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Indian Health Service (IHS). Medsphere’s Government Services Division also applies that VistA expertise to development and testing projects for both VA and IHS. Using a vendor-independent approach to helping hospitals solve critical challenges, the Phoenix Health Systems division provides a host of healthcare IT services, including systems implementation, project management, remote service desk, end-user device management, application management and IT leadership. Medsphere’s ChartLogic division enables better ambulatory care via physician practice EHR, revenue cycle management (RCM) and practice management systems and services. Whatever your healthcare IT challenge, Medsphere has a solution. Learn more about Medsphere at www.medsphere.com.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

DEVENS, Mass. & CARLSBAD, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Medsphere Systems Corporation, the leading provider of affordable and interoperable healthcare IT platform solutions, today announced that the company’s OpenVista® electronic health record (EHR) is live in TaraVista Behavioral Health Center, a new inpatient facility in Devens, Massachusetts. Originally conceived and launched by Health Partners New England (HPNE), TaraVista utilizes the creative forefront of architecture, design and medicine to exemplify the future of behavioral health care. After completing the two initial development phases, TaraVista has 36 beds currently available with an eventual goal of 108 once construction is complete. As part of the OpenVista healthcare IT implementation and go live, TaraVista also contracted with Phoenix Health Systems, a division of Medsphere, for additional IT support services. “Building a hospital from the ground up is not a project for the faint of heart, I can tell you that, but we couldn’t be more pleased with the results,” said HPNE and TaraVista founder and CEO Michael P. Krupa, Ed. D. “I believe TaraVista will serve as a model for how to ensure patient safety and comfort while providing effective, patient-oriented care. That wouldn’t be possible without a comprehensive healthcare IT system, and OpenVista meets every clinical need without overwhelming the budget.” Innovations abound at TaraVista to ensure patient safety. Blinds are housed between two panes of glass and are patient-operable via safe devices, as are special vents for fresh air and outdoor sounds. Towel racks in bathrooms give way when a modest amount of pressure is applied. Furniture is light enough to be moved but too heavy to throw. Hallways telescope so staff can monitor all patients from one station. “Congratulations to HPNE, Michael Krupa and everyone involved in making TaraVista a reality,” said Irv Lichtenwald, Medsphere president and CEO. “Medsphere is very proud to be the chosen healthcare IT system in such a state-of-the-art facility. In many ways, Medsphere’s affordable subscription service and comprehensive functionality enabled TaraVista to focus dollars on the hospital itself without having to choose between competing priorities. TaraVista and HPNE are great examples for all of behavioral health care.” Medsphere's OpenVista EHR is an acute and inpatient behavioral health-oriented portfolio of clinical products and services that leverages the VistA electronic health record (EHR) system developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Indian Health Service (IHS). On top of public domain computer code available through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), Medsphere has developed numerous enhancements that meet the needs and desires of community hospitals. Incorporated in 1998 and located in Winchester, Mass., Health Partners New England is dedicated to providing compassionate, effective, sustainable care for those suffering from mental illness or co-occurring substance use. Health Partners New England’s distinctive approach to management, interim leadership and consultation has produced a substantial record of delivering key financial and clinical metrics through collaborative leadership with administrators, physicians and direct care staff. Founded in 2002 and based in Carlsbad, Calif., Medsphere Systems Corporation is an organization of committed clinical and technology professionals working to make quality healthcare IT solutions accessible to organizations of virtually any size, shape or budget. Medsphere’s OpenVista is an acute and inpatient behavioral health-oriented portfolio of clinical products and services that leverages the VistA electronic health record (EHR) system developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Indian Health Service (IHS). Medsphere’s Government Services Division also applies that VistA expertise to development and testing projects for both VA and IHS. Using a vendor-independent approach to helping hospitals solve critical challenges, the Phoenix Health Systems division provides a host of healthcare IT services, including systems implementation, project management, remote service desk, end-user device management, application management and IT leadership. Medsphere’s ChartLogic division enables better ambulatory care via physician practice EHR, revenue cycle management (RCM) and practice management systems and services. Whatever your healthcare IT challenge, Medsphere has a solution. Learn more about Medsphere at www.medsphere.com.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Deaths by suicide among the White Mountain Apache in Arizona dropped by nearly 40 percent between 2006 and 2012 compared to the previous six-year period, new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the tribe finds. The substantial reduction came after tribal leaders responded to the high number of suicides occurring in their community by passing legislation to develop a surveillance system and intensive prevention program, which tracks and triages those with suicide attempts and suicidal thoughts. The findings are published in the November issue of the American Journal of Public Health. These results bolster the results of a handful of studies to show that suicide is preventable with comprehensive, community-based efforts, and one of the only to show reduction in both attempts and deaths. "Suicide is a public health problem that many don't see as preventable," says study leader Mary Cwik, PhD, a clinical psychologist and researcher at the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health at the Bloomberg School. "In recent years, suicide deaths have surpassed deaths due to motor vehicle crashes, and suicide is the leading cause of death globally for girls between the ages of 15 and 19. This study shows how a courageous community, the White Mountain Apache Tribe, used legislation and community mental health workers to successfully address suicide as a public health crisis." The work of the tribe also included training for adults to identify at-risk youth; two school-based programs -- one enlisting elders to promote cultural engagement, and the other promoting coping and problem-solving skills -- screening and interventions in the tribe's emergency rooms to connect those who attempt suicide or experience a binge drinking or drugging episode with counseling; and a community-based media campaign to promote prevention education. "We are proud of our Tribal Council for passing a law in support of a community-based suicide prevention surveillance system," says Novalene Goklish, BS, outreach team supervisor and member of the White Mountain Apache Tribe who was involved in the study. "We are determined to let our Apache people who are hurting know that there is real help for them." From 2001 to 2006, the suicide rate among the White Mountain Apache members between the ages of 15 and 24 was 13 times that of the general U.S. population, and seven times the rate for all American Indians and Alaska Natives. When the tribe realized the extent of the disparity, they reached out to their long-time partner, the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, to analyze surveillance data and design and implement a comprehensive prevention program. The current study found that in the wake of the new programs, suicide deaths and attempts fell significantly among tribe members. Overall, they found, suicide rates dropped by 38.3 percent, while national rates remained stable or rose. This included a 60-percent decrease among the 25-to-34-year-old group and a 37-percent decline among those between the ages of 20 and 24. While the disparity remains, the trend is encouraging. From 2001 to 2006, 41 Apache tribal members died of suicide, while 29 died from 2007 to 2012. The downward trend in deaths during the study period appeared to be mirrored in suicide attempts. The annual number of attempts decreased from 75 in 2007 to 25 in 2012. To achieve these successes, the tribe developed a unique community surveillance system that tracks and triages suicide deaths, attempts, and suicidal thoughts with technical assistance from the Johns Hopkins researchers. After an incident is reported, Apache outreach workers follow up with in-person visits to verify what happened, listen to the individual's story, provide emotional support, and connect individuals to care. These staff members also follow up to monitor the individual's welfare over time. The secure, password-protected surveillance system allows the tribe to develop and deliver a comprehensive youth suicide prevention program, which they call Celebrating Life. Among the elements of the program: "Suicide is a multifaceted and complicated public health problem," Cwik says. "There is still a lot of work to do, particularly in understanding how to prevent clusters of deaths, or what we call 'contagion,' especially among young people. It is imperative to sustain locally driven efforts, especially after seeing these promising results. The surveillance system and linked prevention programs have shown they can save many young lives." The researchers and the tribe have been approached by at least 10 other tribes in need. They believe their program will not only help American Indians, but other communities at high risk for suicide. "Decreases in Suicide Deaths and Attempts Linked to the White Mountain Apache Suicide Surveillance and Prevention System, 2001- 2012" was written by Mary F. Cwik, PhD; Lauren Tingey, PhD; Alexandra Maschino, MPH; Novalene Goklish, BS; Francene Larzelere-Hinton, BA; John Walkup, MD; and Allison Barlow, PhD. This study was supported by the Native American Centers in Health initiative, which received grants from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of General Medical Science and Indian Health Service (U26IHS300013, U26IHS300286 and U26IHS300414) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's youth suicide prevention initiative (U79SM057835, U79SM059250, and U79SM061473).


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Ultimate Medical Academy (UMA) is proud to announce its inaugural 2016 True Blue Alum, Leticia Barton, a graduate of UMA’s Medical Billing and Coding associate degree program. The UMA True Blue Alum is a special honor that spotlights outstanding UMA alumni who are serving their communities, positively impacting patient outcomes, excelling in their careers and accomplishing other noteworthy goals. One distinguished UMA alum is chosen each quarter. Barton is a member of the Navajo nation from Cedar Springs, Arizona. A proud Diné Native American woman, she is from The Salt Clan People, born for The Red-Running-Into-Water Clan. After graduating from UMA, Barton secured a position at the Phoenix Spine Surgery Center as a Spine Care Specialist. She is responsible for collecting information from patients nationwide and evaluating their eligibility for back and neck surgery. “Students like Leticia are the reason we do what we do,” said UMA President Derek Apanovitch. “With our dedicated student and career advisors, our institution strives to provide a fully supportive learning environment where students feel empowered to succeed in healthcare fields.” Barton’s mother, Rena, graduated from UMA in September 2011, despite battling breast cancer and undergoing chemotherapy. Rena started working as a medical coder with the Indian Health Service on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona, before succumbing to cancer in October of last year. Barton credits her mother for her determination, strong work ethic and confidence. “As I receive this recognition, I think about my mom and all the others who helped me along the way,” said Barton. “While the road has been long, UMA team members worked with me the entire time to help me achieve my lifelong dream – a career in healthcare. I hope my journey at this school can serve as a testament to all those who are thinking about taking that next step in their education but have yet to do so.” “Leticia is an inspiration to not only other students, but to all our staff across our school,” said Apanovitch. “We are proud to have helped her start her career, and we are delighted to honor her with this award.” Learn more about UMA True Blue Alumni by visiting http://www.ultimatemedical.edu/alumni/true-blue-alum/. ABOUT ULTIMATE MEDICAL ACADEMY: Ultimate Medical Academy is a nonprofit healthcare educational institution with a national presence. Headquartered in Tampa, Florida and founded in 1994, UMA offers content-rich, interactive online courses as well as hands-on training at our campuses. UMA students have access to academic advising, one-on-one or group tutoring, résumé and interview coaching, job search assistance, technical support and more. The institution is accredited by the Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools (ABHES). Visit our website at [http://www.UltimateMedical.edu for more information.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The desire to learn is to be commended. Furthering that desire to learn by aiding your community’s health is to be admired. That is why Columbia Southern University (CSU) recently awarded Melanie Fuller of Crestview, Fla., the Hero Behind the Hero Scholarship. As a Navajo, Fuller would like to use the scholarship to complete her CSU online master’s degree in public health “to improve the lives of the people living on the reservation, where highly trained public health professionals are always in need,” she explained. Fuller hopes to possibly work for the Centers for Disease Control or the Indian Health Service. “I have lived my entire life on the Navajo reservation in Arizona prior to joining the U.S. Army, and saw firsthand the impact of Indian Health Service on my community,” the mother of five said. “IHS has a current initiative to fight the rise of diabetes in native communities, called the Special Diabetes Program for Indians. This is an issue that has affected my family, and as a public health professional, I would champion this cause.” She was awarded the university’s Hero Behind the Hero Scholarship which honors the spouses and children of active-duty public safety personnel (firefighters, law enforcement officers, EMTs and dispatchers) and National Guard and military men and women. Four times a year, one scholarship is awarded to the spouse or child of a National Guard or active-duty military man or woman or spouse or child of a public safety personnel. Melanie Fuller is not only the wife of Chief Warrant Officer Frederick Fuller of the U.S. Army, but she has also been a walked in his shoes as an member of the Army. “I served honorable active-duty from 2000 to 2005, and I really want to serve my nation and community again,” she said. “This time in the capacity of a public health professional with the education and training to make a difference.” The CSU scholarship will cover up to $12,600 in one online degree program. The scholarship will be applied directly to the recipient’s tuition for up to three years or until the completion of the selected online degree program, whichever comes first. CSU offers online certificate and degree programs in various fields such as human resource management, organizational leadership, fire administration, criminal justice and business administration. For more information about CSU, visit http://www.columbiasouthern.edu or call 800-977-8449.

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