India Diabetes Research Foundation And Dr A Ramachandrans Diabetes Hospitals

Chennai, India

India Diabetes Research Foundation And Dr A Ramachandrans Diabetes Hospitals

Chennai, India
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Selvam S.,India Diabetes Research Foundation And Dr A Ramachandrans Diabetes Hospitals | Murugesan N.,India Diabetes Research Foundation And Dr A Ramachandrans Diabetes Hospitals | Snehalatha C.,India Diabetes Research Foundation And Dr A Ramachandrans Diabetes Hospitals | Nanditha A.,India Diabetes Research Foundation And Dr A Ramachandrans Diabetes Hospitals | And 4 more authors.
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice | Year: 2017

Aims The aims were to assess effect of a short training programme on non-communicable diseases (NCDs), particularly diabetes on school teachers and also on students who were in turn educated by them. Lifestyle changes made by both groups were assessed 6 months later. Methods Graduate teachers (n = 1017) from 2 districts in Tamilnadu, India were trained using audio visual aids in batches of 100, on healthy lifestyle practices, prevention and management of diabetes. Pre and post training knowledge scores were assessed using questionnaires. Each teacher was requested to impart similar education to 100 high school students within 3 months. Impact of the training on teachers and students was assessed using questionnaires 6 months later. Feedback from the students’ parents was also collected. Results A total of 1017 teachers (men: 33.8%, women: 66.2%, urban: 68.8%, rural: 31.1%) were trained. Among them, 651 (men: 31.3%, women: 68.7%) responded for impact evaluation. Changes in knowledge and attitude were reported by 93.7% of teachers. Improvement in lifestyle of the students was assessed by 587 teachers, 60.4% of the students avoided junk foods, 57.5% advised their family members on diabetes. Outdoor games were played by 50.8% of the students. Improvement in knowledge, changes in lifestyle and a positive attitude towards health care delivery were achieved among teachers and students through this training programme. Conclusions Significant improvement in health perception among the teachers and students occurred even with a short training. It has demonstrated that non-medical personnel like teachers are efficient in disseminating health information on lifestyle diseases especially diabetes. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | India Diabetes Research Foundation And Dr A Ramachandrans Diabetes Hospitals, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, University of Washington, Danube University Krems and 7 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Diabetes care | Year: 2016

The International Diabetes Federation estimates that 415 million adults worldwide now have diabetes and 318 million have impaired glucose tolerance. These numbers are expected to increase to 642 million and 482 million, respectively, by 2040. This burgeoning pandemic places an enormous burden on countries worldwide, particularly resource-poor regions. Numerous landmark trials evaluating both intensive lifestyle modification and pharmacological interventions have persuasively demonstrated that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or its onset can be delayed in high-risk individuals with impaired glucose tolerance. However, key challenges remain, including how to scale up such approaches for widespread translation and implementation, how to select appropriately from various interventions and tailor them for different populations and settings, and how to ensure that preventive interventions yield clinically meaningful, cost-effective outcomes. In June 2015, a Diabetes Care Editors Expert Forum convened to discuss these issues. This article, an outgrowth of the forum, begins with a summary of seminal prevention trials, followed by a discussion of considerations for selecting appropriate populations for intervention and the clinical implications of the various diagnostic criteria for prediabetes. The authors outline knowledge gaps in need of elucidation and explore a possible new avenue for securing regulatory approval of a prevention-related indication for metformin, as well as specific considerations for future pharmacological interventions to delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. They conclude with descriptions of some innovative, pragmatic translational initiatives already under way around the world.


Ramachandran A.,India Diabetes Research Foundation and Dr A Ramachandrans Diabetes Hospitals | Wan Ma R.C.,Chinese University of Hong Kong | Snehalatha C.,India Diabetes Research Foundation and Dr A Ramachandrans Diabetes Hospitals
The Lancet | Year: 2010

Prevalence of type 2 diabetes has rapidly increased in native and migrant Asian populations. Diabetes develops at a younger age in Asian populations than in white populations, hence the morbidity and mortality associated with the disease and its complications are also common in young Asian people. The young age of these populations and the high rates of cardiovascular risk factors seen in Asian people substantially increase lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease. Several distinctive features are apparent in pathogenetic factors for diabetes and their thresholds in Asian populations. The economic burden due to diabetes at personal, societal, and national levels is huge. National strategies to raise public awareness about the disease and to improve standard of care and implementation of programmes for primary prevention are urgently needed. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Loading India Diabetes Research Foundation And Dr A Ramachandrans Diabetes Hospitals collaborators
Loading India Diabetes Research Foundation And Dr A Ramachandrans Diabetes Hospitals collaborators