Lombard, IL, United States

Independent Forensics

www.ifi-test.com
Lombard, IL, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

PubMed | Innovative Decisions, Inc., Pennsylvania State University, University of South Australia, University of Edinburgh and 14 more.
Type: | Journal: Forensic science international | Year: 2016

This letter comments on the report Forensic science in criminal courts: Ensuring scientific validity of feature-comparison methods recently released by the Presidents Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). The report advocates a procedure for evaluation of forensic evidence that is a two-stage procedure in which the first stage is match/non-match and the second stage is empirical assessment of sensitivity (correct acceptance) and false alarm (false acceptance) rates. Almost always, quantitative data from feature-comparison methods are continuously-valued and have within-source variability. We explain why a two-stage procedure is not appropriate for this type of data, and recommend use of statistical procedures which are appropriate.


Old J.,Independent Forensics | Schweers B.A.,Independent Forensics | Boonlayangoor P.W.,Independent Forensics | Fischer B.,California State University, Fresno | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Forensic Sciences | Year: 2012

Tests for the identification of semen commonly involve the microscopic visualization of spermatozoa or assays for the presence of seminal markers such as acid phosphatase (AP) or prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Here, we describe the rapid stain identification kit for the identification of semen (RSID™-Semen), a lateral flow immunochromatographic strip test that uses two antihuman semenogelin monoclonal antibodies to detect the presence of semenogelin. The RSID™-Semen strip is specific for human semen, detecting <2.5nL of semen, and does not cross-react with other human or nonhuman tissues tested. RSID™-Semen is more sensitive with certain forensic evidence samples containing mixtures of vaginal secretions and semen than either of the commercially available PSA-based forensic semen detection tests or tests that measure AP activity that were tested in parallel. The RSID™-Semen kit also allows sampling a fraction of a questioned stain while retaining the majority of the sample for further processing through short tandem repeat analysis. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.


Miller K.W.P.,California State University, Fresno | Old J.,Independent Forensics | Fischer B.R.,California State University, Fresno | Schweers B.,Independent Forensics | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Forensic Sciences | Year: 2011

With sexual assault evidence, the visualization of spermatozoa confirms that ejaculation has occurred. However, microscopic examination of spermatozoa is a laborious process and can sometimes result in sperm cells being overlooked. Here, we present the developmental validation of the SPERM HY-LITER™ kit, which contains a human sperm-specific mouse monoclonal antibody coupled to a fluorescent Alexa 488 dye. The kit was tested using samples of human semen, saliva, blood, and urine, various animal semen extracts, sexual lubricants, and a commercially available spermicidal film. Postcoital vaginal swabs, degraded semen samples, and samples prepared with sample fixation techniques that deviated from the kit-provided protocol were also tested. In each case, the SPERM HY-LITER™ kit was demonstrated to bind only to human sperm cell heads. Limitations to this fluorescent staining procedure include nonspecific staining and increased background fluorescence with extreme heat fixation in some samples. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.


Westring C.G.,Copenhagen University | Westring C.G.,Grove Labs | Wiuf M.,Copenhagen University | Nielsen S.J.,Copenhagen University | And 5 more authors.
Forensic Science International: Genetics | Year: 2014

Accurate microscopic identification of human spermatozoa is important in sexual assault cases. We have compared the results of examinations with (1) a fluorescent microscopy method, SPERM HY-LITER™, and (2) Baecchi's method for identification of human spermatozoa. In 35 artificial, forensic type samples, spermatozoa were identified in 45.7% with SPERM HY-LITER™ in Copenhagen, in 54.3% in the laboratory of the manufacturer of SPERM HY-LITER™, and 40.0% of the samples with Baecchi's staining method. When differences occurred between the two methods, it was significantly more often that SPERM HY-LITER™ detected spermatozoa when Baecchi's method did not (ts = 6.567, df = 1, P = 0.048). This trend was also seen in selected compromised or degraded samples and in selected adjudicative samples. The reactions with spermatozoa from dog, horse, pig and bull were negative with SPERM HY-LITER™, whereas Baecchi's method was non-selective. Data from forensic casework samples in Copenhagen from two years (2008 and 2009) are presented. The samples from 2008 were investigated using Baecchi's method, while those from 2009 were investigated using SPERM HY-LITER™. The frequencies of positive results were similar between the two methods for the two years (27.9% and 32.1% respectively). Analysis of acid phosphatase (ACP) activity for the positive results obtained for these two years does not support the use of a negative ACP result as a prescreen for microscopic analysis for spermatozoa. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


PubMed | Grove Labs, 11 Health, Independent Forensics, Copenhagen University and University of Denver
Type: | Journal: Forensic science international. Genetics | Year: 2014

Accurate microscopic identification of human spermatozoa is important in sexual assault cases. We have compared the results of examinations with (1) a fluorescent microscopy method, SPERM HY-LITER, and (2) Baecchis method for identification of human spermatozoa. In 35 artificial, forensic type samples, spermatozoa were identified in 45.7% with SPERM HY-LITER in Copenhagen, in 54.3% in the laboratory of the manufacturer of SPERM HY-LITER, and 40.0% of the samples with Baecchis staining method. When differences occurred between the two methods, it was significantly more often that SPERM HY-LITER detected spermatozoa when Baecchis method did not (ts=6.567, df=1, P=0.048). This trend was also seen in selected compromised or degraded samples and in selected adjudicative samples. The reactions with spermatozoa from dog, horse, pig and bull were negative with SPERM HY-LITER, whereas Baecchis method was non-selective. Data from forensic casework samples in Copenhagen from two years (2008 and 2009) are presented. The samples from 2008 were investigated using Baecchis method, while those from 2009 were investigated using SPERM HY-LITER. The frequencies of positive results were similar between the two methods for the two years (27.9% and 32.1% respectively). Analysis of acid phosphatase (ACP) activity for the positive results obtained for these two years does not support the use of a negative ACP result as a prescreen for microscopic analysis for spermatozoa.


PubMed | Independent Forensics
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of forensic sciences | Year: 2012

Tests for the identification of semen commonly involve the microscopic visualization of spermatozoa or assays for the presence of seminal markers such as acid phosphatase (AP) or prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Here, we describe the rapid stain identification kit for the identification of semen (RSID-Semen), a lateral flow immunochromatographic strip test that uses two antihuman semenogelin monoclonal antibodies to detect the presence of semenogelin. The RSID-Semen strip is specific for human semen, detecting <2.5 nL of semen, and does not cross-react with other human or nonhuman tissues tested. RSID-Semen is more sensitive with certain forensic evidence samples containing mixtures of vaginal secretions and semen than either of the commercially available PSA-based forensic semen detection tests or tests that measure AP activity that were tested in parallel. The RSID-Semen kit also allows sampling a fraction of a questioned stain while retaining the majority of the sample for further processing through short tandem repeat analysis.


Grant
Agency: Department of Homeland Security | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2015

The goal of this project is to develop a validated, commercial quality reagent kit for the reliable collection of fingerprints (i.e., latent ridge impressions) that would subsequently be used for both comparison and DNA profiling. The kit would provide all required materials, reagents, solutions and would include a detailed protocol describing the steps to (i) identify latent ridge impressions (already a well-developed technique) using specific DNA-free powders, (ii) collect the revealed ridge impressions on tape lifts or hinge cards (again, using DNA-free versions of these tape-related items), (iii) recover the left-over DNA on the original item of evidence (i.e., the DNA that is not lifted by the sticky tapes) and (iv) once an image of the ridge impressions is recorded, extract, and purify the DNA from the sticky side of the tape lift or hinge card. The recovered, purified DNA would be used with any commercial DNA-STR kit. As the amount of DNA present on fingerprints or handled objects is extremely small, the kit will include reagents required for post-PCR purification and concentration- this technique increases the efficiency of capillary electrophoresis by ~20 fold. Our laboratory has significant R&D experience on the molecular biological methods for the collection, extraction and purification of DNA from limiting biological samples, including individual fingerprints developed with powders and in the following SBIR submission will detail the experimental approaches for optimizing this technique for the recovery of DNA from tape lifts and hinge cards, the current standards for collecting latent ridge impressions for comparison purposes.


Independent Forensics | Entity website

Microscopes Sperm Isolation Sperm Isolation SPERM ISOLATION SPERM HY-LITERISOLATION PKG: Identify and isolate sperm directlyisolate sperm cells or epi cell nuclei stained with SPERM HY-LITER using a semi-automated 3D micromanipulator with our customized stereo microscope. Eliminate differential extractions! The aureka robot allows you to isolate sperm from other nuclei and deposit it directly into a PCR tube for DNA testing ...


Independent Forensics | Entity website

DNA Paternity Testing Prenatal


Independent Forensics | Entity website

DNA Forensics Forensic Testing Services and Prices Call to Schedule a Test, Consultation, or for Additional Pricing at (866) 434-2400. Independent Forensics also tests samples though human body fluid identification from saliva, semen, blood and urine ...

Loading Independent Forensics collaborators
Loading Independent Forensics collaborators