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Charlton, MA, United States

Patent
Incom, Inc. | Date: 2013-11-04

An X-ray anti-scatter grid having thinner X-ray opaque layers, smaller X-ray opaque diameters, greater aspect ratio, lower weight and improved image resolution is disclosed. A method of forming the X-ray anti-scatter grid is disclosed that includes a set of hollow X-ray transparent glass capillary tubes that are fused together, with an X-ray opaque layer thick enough to block X-rays at a specified energy inside the capillary tubes. The capillary tubes provide the high aspect ratio and light weight, while the X-ray opaque layer is provided by a deposition process that has features similar to atomic layer deposition (ALD). The high aspect ratio and thin layers improves resolution and decreases image artifacts, and large area X-ray anti-scatter grids are provided by aligning the axis of the an X-ray opaque layers to the X-ray source.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2005

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The specific objective of the proposed innovative research is to demonstrate an advanced, second generation technique to manufacture fiber optic interrogated (FOI) microwell biochips that results in significant cost reduction, enabling a disposable product, while providing improved performance required for high speed genomic and proteomic analysis. The new manufacturing technique will utilize proven photolithography techniques to apply photocurable epoxy based photoresists to form permanent, well adhered microwells on the surface of fiber optic array plates. Fiber optic arrays offer important advantages as a platform for biosensors. Light incident on the top surface of the array is optically guided to the bottom surface, where it can be directly monitored optically. Incom Inc, a manufacturer of etched FOI microarray plates, will collaborate on the proposed research with 454 Life Sciences, a firm that has created a massively parallel whole genome sequencing system. When used in conjunction with an automated microfluidic genome sequencing system, the new biochip is expected to offer significant technical benefits that go beyond cost reduction; improved fluidic response, reduced reagent carry forward, and enhanced sealing and optical (CCD) interrogation of the biochip microwell. Disposable FOI Microwell biochips resulting from this development will have immediate commercial application to "whole genome sequencing". The ultimate beneficiaries of this technology will be the public served by a reliable, sensitive, high speed and low cost diagnostic technique.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.48K | Year: 2010

As the dimensions of fundamental scientific and technological structures and processes become smaller, research in these areas is often limited to a few very large and costly particle accelerator facilities. A revolutionary approach utilizing photonic band-gap (PBG) microstructures offers the opportunity to develop compact highgradient inexpensive accelerators. A unique opportunity of this proposal is that this new generation of linear particle accelerator (linac) with a 20-100-fold increase in accelerating gradients relative to OFHC copper also provides potential revolutions in other fields that rely on the use of free electron bunches or beams. Among many examples are instruments needed for both the fabrication and characterization of nanostructures because these are typically based on high-energy electron and ion beams i.e. e-beam lithography, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, focused ion beams, X-ray sources, Auger spectroscopy and the like. - In Phase I Incom Incorporated (Charlton, MA) and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) collaborated to fabricate PBG structures from borosilicate glass that serve as TM01 cavities and couplers when properly driven by lasers and will allow tests of basic concepts for PBG accelerators. Prototype PBG wafer structures fabricated by Incom in Phase I and based on SLAC calculations that predicted accelerating modes were fabricated and then analyzed by using CUDOS software. The results were extremely encouraging since the presence of modes, and their general behavior in the presence of fabrication errors agreed with the overall design calculations. SLAC concluded that the existence of an accelerating mode (determined by the photonic software calculations) for the as-built geometry provides a technical basis to proceed to Phase II and provides key guidance for adjusting the defect size slightly to tune the mode


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.94K | Year: 2009

As the dimensions of fundamental scientific and technological structures and processes become smaller, research in these areas is often limited to a few very large and costly particle accelerator facilities. A revolutionary approach utilizing photonic band-gap (PBG) microstructures offers the opportunity to develop compact high-gradient inexpensive accelerators. A unique opportunity of this proposal is that this new generation of linear particle accelerator (linac) with a 20-100-fold increase in accelerating gradients relative to OFHC copper also provides potential revolutions in other fields that rely on the use of free electron bunches or beams. Among many examples are instruments needed for both the fabrication and characterization of nanostructures because these are typically based on high-energy electron and ion beams i.e. e-beam lithography, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, focused ion beams, X-ray sources, Auger spectroscopy and the like. In Phase I Incom Incorporated (Charlton, MA) and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) will collaborate to fabricate PBG structures in borosilicate glass that serve as TM01 cavities and couplers when properly driven by lasers and will allow tests of basic concepts for PBG accelerators. SLAC will provide theoretical guidance, optical testing of prototypes, and develop the approach for coupling of optical fields and electron beams to the array. Incom will fabricate PBG structures by extending their established borosilicate microcapillary technology and develop paradigms for extending the fabrication to fused silica (SiO2) in Phase II. Incom Phase I deliverables will include development of processes to reliably produce PBG glass samples. SLAC deliverables will include development of physical diagnostic and modeling techniques, to assess their utility for electron accelerator applications at 2-micron wavelengths. A full technical report and program plan for continued development will be prepared. Commercial Application and Other Benefits as described by the awardee: - Successful development of photonic bandgap accelerators will result in a new class of small powerful low-cost accelerators that could eventually lead beyond ¿tabletop¿ systems to create highly integrated, subminiature systems based on IC technology or full systems on a single chip (SOCs). These small inexpensive accelerators will have applications throughout industrial fabrication, structural analysis, diagnostics, and instrumentation. Potential medical benefits are profound e.g. by supplying systems with transmission through tissue but that do no damage such as THz versus x rays.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 500.00K | Year: 2006

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II research project will aid in the development of high-density glass microcapillary bioplates that will offer complete flexibility in the choice of diameter and thickness of the capillaries. These features are not currently available in an exiting product. Through an innovative low-cost fabrication approach, the disposable bioplate will allow for massive parallel experimentation that is crucial for large-scale high-integrity measurements. The proposed research will provide for a dramatic and cost effective increase in high-throughput screening programs in all phases of drug discovery and target validation. The ability to accelerate the analysis of targets in a cost effective manner will provide for more effective screening programs.

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