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News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

Led by Ontario, Canada is looking to fill their looming energy supply gap, and address climate change, by building a fleet of the new super-safe small modular nuclear reactors (SMRs) over the next 20 years. Ontario’s electricity supply is quite low-carbon already, with about 60% nuclear and 20% hydropower, with gas about 10%. Canada overall is about 60% hydropower and 16% nuclear, with the rest spread out among coal, gas and wind. At 50 grams of CO2 per kWh, Canada is one of the cleanest grids in the world. Aggressive targets for further reducing carbon emissions from Ontario resulted in 7 GW of coal-fired generation closing between 2005 and 2014. The province’s largest utility, Ontario Power Generation, replaced all its coal with renewable energy backed-up by natural gas, plus life extensions of almost 7 GW of existing nuclear. In October 2016, Ontario Power Generation started a US$9.6 billion refurbishment project at its 3.5 GW Darlington nuclear plant to extend the lifespan by 30 years. Bruce Power has also begun a US$10 billion life-extension project for its 6.3 GW nuclear plant northwest of Toronto. The utility plans to close its 3 GW Pickering nuclear plant in 2024, so it needs new carbon-free power to ensure Ontario meets its 2030 goal to cut carbon emissions by 37% below 1990 levels, and its even more ambitious 2050 goal of being 80% below 1990 levels. As Nicolle Butcher, Vice President of Strategy & Acquisitions at Ontario Power Generation, told the 2017 International SMR and Advanced Reactor Summit in Atlanta, Georgia last month, “Ontario Power Generation forecasts a significant gap in its power generation mix after 2030, and it intends to fill this gap with nuclear power.” Butcher added that long-term economic uncertainties and a lack of long-term political stability favor SMR plants with short lead times rather than large-scale nuclear projects. Ontario Power Generation has maintained the option to build new nuclear plants by obtaining a 10-year site preparation license in 2012 at its Darlington nuclear plant near Toronto. Canada is a pioneer in nuclear power. The CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor was designed in the 1950s – a heavy water reactor that can make the most of Canada's uranium supplies without the need to enrich. All 19 of Canada's nuclear reactors are CANDU and there are 31 CANDU reactors around the world. A number of advanced nuclear reactor developers are targeting the Canadian market, where a risk-informed regulatory framework is considered more flexible and conducive to licensing new designs than in the United States, and where numerous remote communities and industrial facilities represent captive electricity consumers. Canada even has a fusion reactor design company, General Fusion. Ontario has most of the large-scale nuclear power plants in the country, but several Canadian provinces are seen as potential markets for SMRs, making for a Pan-Canadian nuclear approach with standardized designs. Saskatchewan is a global uranium producer that could easily supply all these reactors with nuclear fuel for centuries. GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy and Advanced Reactor Concepts are jointly developing and licensing a sodium-cooled advanced small modular reactor (aSMR) based on their reactor technologies, and plan to enter the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's Vendor Design Review process. In January, NuScale Power out of Oregon announced their submission to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of the first design certification application for any SMR in the United States. It is expected to be built in the early 2020s. ThorCon has a molten salt design that uses thorium as well as uranium. But Canada’s own new SMR company, Terrestrial Energy Inc. (TEI), has a new small modular Integral Molten Salt Reactor (IMSR) design that is ideal for this future, that is, a nuclear reactor that: - is cheaper than coal and can last for decades longer - is a 400 MWt (190 MWe) modular design, one able to be adapted to needs for both on and off-grid heat and power - is small and modular enough to allow simple construction in under 4 years, and trucking of modules to the site - operates at normal pressures, removing those safety issues, and at higher temperatures, providing more energy for the same amount of fuel - it does not require water for cooling and has the type of passive safety systems that make it walk-away safe - can load-follow rapidly to buffer the intermittency of renewables - generates less waste that is also more easily managed Terrestrial Energy’s reactor uses the natural convection of the molten salt to remove the heat to the vessel walls passively where its containment silo simply adsorbs the heat decay and conducts it away – this is passive cooling at its simplest. The Canadian Power Workers Union is all for expanding nuclear. They understand safe, secure, high-paying jobs. Nuclear is the foundation of Ontario’s and New Brunswick’s electricity systems and nuclear will be providing large volumes of affordable, baseload, low-carbon electricity, week in and week out, for decades to come. Besides, nuclear power shrugs off a Polar Vortex like it’s a summer’s day. Dr. James Conca is an expert on energy, nuclear and dirty bombs, a planetary geologist, and a professional speaker. Follow him on Twitter @jimconca and see his book at Amazon.com


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: phys.org

Three drosophila epilines are shown. All share the same DNA sequence, but each has a unique eye color caused by transient perturbation of their epigenetic state. This perturbation alters levels of Polycomb-mediated repression of the eye color gene. Credit: Filippo Ciabrelli Giacomo Cavalli's team at the Institute of Human Genetics (University of Montpellier / CNRS), in collaboration with the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), has demonstrated the existence of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance (TEI) among Drosophila fruit flies. By temporarily modifying the function of Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins—which play an essential role in development—the researchers obtained fruit fly lines having the same DNA sequence but different eye colors. An example of epigenetic inheritance, this color diversity reflects varying degrees of heritable, but reversible, gene repression by PcG proteins. It is observed in both transgenic and wild-type lines and can be modified by environmental conditions such as ambient temperature. The scientists' work is published in Nature Genetics. Same DNA, different color. Researchers have obtained drosophila epilines—that is, genetically identical lineages with distinct epigenetic characteristics—with white, yellow, and red eyes respectively. They achieved this by transiently disturbing interactions between target genes and PcG proteins, which are complexes involved in the repression of several genes governing development. Cavalli and his team at the Institute of Human Genetics (University of Montpellier / CNRS) are the first to show that regulation of gene position can lead to transgenerational inheritance. DNA is not the only medium for communicating information necessary for cell function. Cell processes are also determined by the chemical labeling (or marks) and specific spatial organization of our genomes, which are epigenetic characteristics—that is, nongenetic but nonetheless inheritable traits. Epigenetic marks include modifications of histones, the proteins around which DNA is wound. PcG proteins, on the other hand, play a regulatory role by affecting 3-D chromosomal configuration, which establishes certain interactions between genes in the cell nucleus. The position of a gene at any given moment determines whether it is active or repressed. Through temporary disruption of these interactions, the scientists were able to produce Drosophila epilines characterized by different levels of PcG-dependent gene repression or activation. They verified that these epilines were indeed isogenic, or genetically identical, by sequencing the genome of each. Despite their identical DNA, the integrity of epilines—and the unique phenotypic characteristics they program—can be maintained across generations. But this phenomenon is reversible. Crosses between drosophilas with over- or underexpressed genes and others having no such modifications to gene activity "reset" eye color without altering the DNA sequence, thus demonstrating the epigenetic nature of this inheritance. The researchers then showed that new environmental conditions, such as a different ambient temperature, can affect the expression of epigenetic information over several generations, but they do not erase this information. Such transient effects of environmental factors to which earlier generations were exposed on the expression of characteristics in their progeny illustrate the unique, pliable nature of this epigenetic mechanism. By conducting "microcosm" experiments that recreated natural environmental conditions, the researchers—working with INRA—confirmed that epigenetic inheritance in Drosophila can be maintained in the wild. Giacomo Cavalli's crew has therefore proven the existence of Polycomb-mediated stable transgenerational epigenetic inheritance dependent on 3-D chromosomal structure. Their findings offer new horizons for biomedical science. They suggest that epigenetics could partly solve the mystery of "missing heritability"—that is, the absence of any apparent link between genetic makeup and certain normal hereditary traits and diseases. More information: Filippo Ciabrelli et al. Stable Polycomb-dependent transgenerational inheritance of chromatin states in Drosophila, Nature Genetics (2017). DOI: 10.1038/ng.3848


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., April 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Templeton closed-end Funds referenced below, which trade on the New York Stock Exchange, today released portfolio allocation updates containing the following information as of March 31, 2017: To obtain a copy of the updates, please contact Fund Information at 1-800-342-5236. Templeton Dragon Fund, Inc. (NYSE:TDF)             Templeton Emerging Markets Income Fund (NYSE:TEI)             Templeton Global Income Fund (NYSE:GIM)             The Funds’ investment managers are subsidiaries of Franklin Resources, Inc. (NYSE:BEN), a global investment management organization operating as Franklin Templeton Investments. Franklin Templeton Investments provides global and domestic investment management to retail, institutional and sovereign wealth clients in over 170 countries. Through specialized teams, the company has expertise across all asset classes — including equity, fixed income, alternative and custom solutions.  The company’s more than 650 investment professionals are supported by its integrated, worldwide team of risk management professionals and global trading desk network.  With offices in over 30 countries, the California–based company has 70 years of investment experience and approximately $740 billion in assets under management as of March 31, 2017.  For more information, please visit franklintempleton.com. This press release contains statistical data regarding the Fund’s portfolio. The Fund’s complete portfolio holdings are publicly available on a quarterly basis on Form N-Q, as well as in the Fund’s Annual and Semi-Annual Report to Shareholders filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. These documents may be found at sec.gov. For portfolio management discussions, including information regarding the Fund’s investment strategies, please view the most recent Annual or Semi-Annual Report to Shareholders which can be found at franklintempleton.com or sec.gov. You may request a copy of the Fund's current Report to Shareholders by contacting Franklin Templeton’s Fund Information Department at 1-800/DIAL BEN® (1-800-342-5236) or by visiting franklintempleton.com. All investments involve risks, including possible loss of principal. Special risks are associated with foreign investing, including currency volatility, economic instability and political developments of countries where the Fund invests. Emerging markets involve heightened risks related to the same factors, in addition to those associated with their relatively small size and lesser liquidity. There are special risks associated with investments in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, including exposure to currency fluctuations, less liquidity, expropriation, confiscatory taxation, nationalization and exchange control regulations (including currency blockage), inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation and interest rates. In addition, investments in Taiwan could be adversely affected by its political and economic relationship with China. Because the Fund invests its assets primarily in companies in a specific region, the Fund is subject to greater risks of adverse developments in that region and/or the surrounding regions than a fund that is more broadly diversified geographically. Political, social or economic disruptions in the region, even in countries in which the Fund is not invested, may adversely affect the value of securities held by the Fund. Also, as a non-diversified investment company investing in “China companies,” the Fund may invest in a relatively small number of issuers and, as a result, be subject to a greater risk of loss with respect to its portfolio securities. The Fund is actively managed and investment allocations can be expected to change, but there is no guarantee that the manager’s investment decisions will produce the desired results. The industry allocation uses MSCI's industry definitions for the convenience of comparison. The information provided is as of the date shown and comes from sources considered reliable, but the Fund makes no representation or warranty as to its completeness or accuracy. You may request a copy of the Fund's current Report to Shareholders by contacting Franklin Templeton’s Fund Information Department at 1-800/DIAL BEN® (1-800-342-5236) or by visiting franklintempleton.com. All investments involve risks, including possible loss of principal. Changes in interest rates will affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio and its share price and yield. Bond prices generally move in the opposite direction of interest rates. Thus, as prices of bonds in the Fund adjust to a rise in interest rates, the Fund’s share price may decline. Special risks are associated with foreign investing, including currency fluctuations, economic instability and political developments of countries where the Fund invests. The Fund’s investments in emerging market countries are subject to all of the risks of foreign investing generally, and have additional heightened risks due to these markets’ smaller size and lesser liquidity and lack of established legal, political, business and social frameworks to support securities markets, including: delays in settling portfolio securities transactions; currency and capital controls; greater sensitivity to interest rate changes; pervasiveness of corruption and crime; currency exchange rate volatility; and inflation, deflation or currency devaluation. The markets for particular securities or types of securities are or may become relatively illiquid. Reduced liquidity will have an adverse impact on the security’s value and on the Fund’s ability to sell such securities when necessary to meet the Fund’s liquidity needs or in response to a specific market event.  Derivatives, including currency management strategies, involve costs and can create economic leverage in the portfolio that may result in significant volatility and cause the Fund to participate in losses (as well as enable gains) on an amount that exceeds the Fund’s initial investment. The Fund may not achieve the anticipated benefits and may realize losses when a counterparty fails to perform as promised. As a nondiversified investment company, the Fund may invest in a relatively small number of issuers and, as a result, be subject to a greater risk of loss with respect to its portfolio securities. The Fund is actively managed and investment allocations can be expected to change, but there is no guarantee that the manager’s investment decisions will produce the desired results. The information provided is as of the date shown and comes from sources considered reliable, but the Fund makes no representation or warranty as to its completeness or accuracy. The weightings do not include the impact of currency forwards within the country weightings. You may request a copy of the Fund's current Report to Shareholders by contacting Franklin Templeton’s Fund Information Department at 1-800/DIAL BEN® (1-800-342-5236) or by visiting franklintempleton.com. All investments involve risks, including possible loss of principal. Changes in interest rates will affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio and its share price and yield. Bond prices generally move in the opposite direction of interest rates. Thus, as prices of bonds in the Fund adjust to a rise in interest rates, the Fund’s share price may decline. Special risks are associated with foreign investing, including currency fluctuations, economic instability and political developments of countries where the Fund invests. Investments in developing markets involve heightened risks related to the same factors, in addition to those associated with their relatively small size and lesser liquidity. The markets for particular securities or types of securities are or may become relatively illiquid. Reduced liquidity will have an adverse impact on the security’s value and on the Fund’s ability to sell such securities when necessary to meet the Fund’s liquidity needs or in response to a specific market event. Derivatives, including currency management strategies, involve costs and can create economic leverage in the portfolio that may result in significant volatility and cause the Fund to participate in losses (as well as enable gains) on an amount that exceeds the Fund’s initial investment. The Fund may not achieve the anticipated benefits and may realize losses when a counterparty fails to perform as promised. As a non-diversified investment company, the Fund may invest in a relatively small number of issuers and, as a result, be subject to a greater risk of loss with respect to its portfolio securities. The Fund is actively managed and investment allocations can be expected to change, but there is no guarantee that the manager’s investment decisions will produce the desired results. The information provided is as of the date shown and comes from sources considered reliable, but the Fund makes no representation or warranty as to its completeness or accuracy. The weightings do not include the impact of currency forwards within the country weightings.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., April 18, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Templeton closed-end Funds referenced below, which trade on the New York Stock Exchange, today released portfolio allocation updates containing the following information as of March 31, 2017: To obtain a copy of the updates, please contact Fund Information at 1-800-342-5236. Templeton Dragon Fund, Inc. (NYSE:TDF)             Templeton Emerging Markets Income Fund (NYSE:TEI)             Templeton Global Income Fund (NYSE:GIM)             The Funds’ investment managers are subsidiaries of Franklin Resources, Inc. (NYSE:BEN), a global investment management organization operating as Franklin Templeton Investments. Franklin Templeton Investments provides global and domestic investment management to retail, institutional and sovereign wealth clients in over 170 countries. Through specialized teams, the company has expertise across all asset classes — including equity, fixed income, alternative and custom solutions.  The company’s more than 650 investment professionals are supported by its integrated, worldwide team of risk management professionals and global trading desk network.  With offices in over 30 countries, the California–based company has 70 years of investment experience and approximately $740 billion in assets under management as of March 31, 2017.  For more information, please visit franklintempleton.com. This press release contains statistical data regarding the Fund’s portfolio. The Fund’s complete portfolio holdings are publicly available on a quarterly basis on Form N-Q, as well as in the Fund’s Annual and Semi-Annual Report to Shareholders filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. These documents may be found at sec.gov. For portfolio management discussions, including information regarding the Fund’s investment strategies, please view the most recent Annual or Semi-Annual Report to Shareholders which can be found at franklintempleton.com or sec.gov. You may request a copy of the Fund's current Report to Shareholders by contacting Franklin Templeton’s Fund Information Department at 1-800/DIAL BEN® (1-800-342-5236) or by visiting franklintempleton.com. All investments involve risks, including possible loss of principal. Special risks are associated with foreign investing, including currency volatility, economic instability and political developments of countries where the Fund invests. Emerging markets involve heightened risks related to the same factors, in addition to those associated with their relatively small size and lesser liquidity. There are special risks associated with investments in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, including exposure to currency fluctuations, less liquidity, expropriation, confiscatory taxation, nationalization and exchange control regulations (including currency blockage), inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation and interest rates. In addition, investments in Taiwan could be adversely affected by its political and economic relationship with China. Because the Fund invests its assets primarily in companies in a specific region, the Fund is subject to greater risks of adverse developments in that region and/or the surrounding regions than a fund that is more broadly diversified geographically. Political, social or economic disruptions in the region, even in countries in which the Fund is not invested, may adversely affect the value of securities held by the Fund. Also, as a non-diversified investment company investing in “China companies,” the Fund may invest in a relatively small number of issuers and, as a result, be subject to a greater risk of loss with respect to its portfolio securities. The Fund is actively managed and investment allocations can be expected to change, but there is no guarantee that the manager’s investment decisions will produce the desired results. The industry allocation uses MSCI's industry definitions for the convenience of comparison. The information provided is as of the date shown and comes from sources considered reliable, but the Fund makes no representation or warranty as to its completeness or accuracy. You may request a copy of the Fund's current Report to Shareholders by contacting Franklin Templeton’s Fund Information Department at 1-800/DIAL BEN® (1-800-342-5236) or by visiting franklintempleton.com. All investments involve risks, including possible loss of principal. Changes in interest rates will affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio and its share price and yield. Bond prices generally move in the opposite direction of interest rates. Thus, as prices of bonds in the Fund adjust to a rise in interest rates, the Fund’s share price may decline. Special risks are associated with foreign investing, including currency fluctuations, economic instability and political developments of countries where the Fund invests. The Fund’s investments in emerging market countries are subject to all of the risks of foreign investing generally, and have additional heightened risks due to these markets’ smaller size and lesser liquidity and lack of established legal, political, business and social frameworks to support securities markets, including: delays in settling portfolio securities transactions; currency and capital controls; greater sensitivity to interest rate changes; pervasiveness of corruption and crime; currency exchange rate volatility; and inflation, deflation or currency devaluation. The markets for particular securities or types of securities are or may become relatively illiquid. Reduced liquidity will have an adverse impact on the security’s value and on the Fund’s ability to sell such securities when necessary to meet the Fund’s liquidity needs or in response to a specific market event.  Derivatives, including currency management strategies, involve costs and can create economic leverage in the portfolio that may result in significant volatility and cause the Fund to participate in losses (as well as enable gains) on an amount that exceeds the Fund’s initial investment. The Fund may not achieve the anticipated benefits and may realize losses when a counterparty fails to perform as promised. As a nondiversified investment company, the Fund may invest in a relatively small number of issuers and, as a result, be subject to a greater risk of loss with respect to its portfolio securities. The Fund is actively managed and investment allocations can be expected to change, but there is no guarantee that the manager’s investment decisions will produce the desired results. The information provided is as of the date shown and comes from sources considered reliable, but the Fund makes no representation or warranty as to its completeness or accuracy. The weightings do not include the impact of currency forwards within the country weightings. You may request a copy of the Fund's current Report to Shareholders by contacting Franklin Templeton’s Fund Information Department at 1-800/DIAL BEN® (1-800-342-5236) or by visiting franklintempleton.com. All investments involve risks, including possible loss of principal. Changes in interest rates will affect the value of the Fund’s portfolio and its share price and yield. Bond prices generally move in the opposite direction of interest rates. Thus, as prices of bonds in the Fund adjust to a rise in interest rates, the Fund’s share price may decline. Special risks are associated with foreign investing, including currency fluctuations, economic instability and political developments of countries where the Fund invests. Investments in developing markets involve heightened risks related to the same factors, in addition to those associated with their relatively small size and lesser liquidity. The markets for particular securities or types of securities are or may become relatively illiquid. Reduced liquidity will have an adverse impact on the security’s value and on the Fund’s ability to sell such securities when necessary to meet the Fund’s liquidity needs or in response to a specific market event. Derivatives, including currency management strategies, involve costs and can create economic leverage in the portfolio that may result in significant volatility and cause the Fund to participate in losses (as well as enable gains) on an amount that exceeds the Fund’s initial investment. The Fund may not achieve the anticipated benefits and may realize losses when a counterparty fails to perform as promised. As a non-diversified investment company, the Fund may invest in a relatively small number of issuers and, as a result, be subject to a greater risk of loss with respect to its portfolio securities. The Fund is actively managed and investment allocations can be expected to change, but there is no guarantee that the manager’s investment decisions will produce the desired results. The information provided is as of the date shown and comes from sources considered reliable, but the Fund makes no representation or warranty as to its completeness or accuracy. The weightings do not include the impact of currency forwards within the country weightings.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.engineeringnews.co.za

Local trade conditions have remained in negative territory in April, with the South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s (Sacci’s) Trade Activity Index (TAI) weakening further to 45 from 46 in March. The index has remained below the neutral 50-point level since October 2016. However, the seasonal adjusted TAI improved by two index points to 45. The seasonally adjusted Trade Expectations Index (TEI) weakened further, by two index points, to 49, in April – the first time since April 2016, after recovering to a level of 61, in February, that the seasonally adjusted TEI moved into negative territory. “It appears that peripheral matters to trade were still weighing heavily on trade conditions in April,” said Sacci. Respondents mentioned that extraneous factors such as emigration, political uncertainty, higher unemployment and crime are impeding trade, while uncertain economic and business conditions result in staff retrenchments and less credit availability. Further, large shifts in the currency value made it difficult to conduct international trade. Improved marketing and larger export penetration were positive counter actions.  Recent sales volumes were notably hard-hit as the sales volumes index decreased from 52 in March to 44 in April, while the new orders index dipped by three points to 40. The expectations for sales volumes index remained low at 55 in April, after reaching 73 in February, while the expectations for new orders index also declining further from 53 to 50 in April. The inventory index improved to 47 from a stalled level of 40 in March. The selling price index increased slightly to 62 from 61 while the input price index declined to 62 from 63 in March. Although still high, the price indices could imply that inflation is stable at present. Inflationary expectations indices remained high but reasonably stable, at 69 and 76, respectively, for the selling and input price indices in April.   The employment subindex remained on 48 in April but was lower than the 50 of April 2016. The employment diagnosis in the trade environment for the next six months remains weak and is cause for concern as the employment expectations index stayed put at 43 in April.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

With this new feature structural changes are tracked in addition to content changes. This means that Xeditor knows when and where elements were moved, added, or deleted, so that users never lose any important version history. Xeditor has also color coordinated all user changes and added in-context Accept/Reject buttons - making it even easier to collaborate across teams. Track changes also works in offline mode, saving them locally until a connection is re-established. With the new minimalist and transparent flat design, the Xeditor user interface and user experience have been fundamentally improved and the loading and response times optimized. Simpler menu navigation and a new toolbar lead the user efficiently to its desired result. In addition, the revised context menu provides an element search to help users find items more quickly. With the new release, Xeditor was updated to ExtJS version 6.2.1 and a Google Drive connection plug-in was integrated. Xeditor, the web-based WYSIWYG editor, allows authors to create and edit XML documents intuitively without any technical knowledge. Xeditor effortlessly integrates into other pre-existing systems (CMS, PIM, etc.) and is fully customizable and extendable. Xeditor supports DITA, TEI, JATS, DocBook, S100D and other technical standards. Xpublisher Inc, an innovative and dynamic company in Munich/Seattle, offers among other things software solutions for XML based jobs and publishing. The development of modern and open software architectures allows flexible and tailor-made customer solutions. Xpublisher Inc. provides Xeditor, the web-based XML editor and Xpublisher, with the XML editing system.


Patent
Tei Co. | Date: 2012-12-13

Speaker systems having simple structure, high output power, and desired directivity are disclosed. In one embodiment, a speaker system includes a first sound emission surface that emits a first sound in a first direction and a second sound emission surface that emits a second sound in a second direction that intersects with the first direction at a predetermined angle. The first and second sounds include at least sounds respectively generated from a common first signal source and different in phase from each other.


Patent
Tei Co. | Date: 2013-06-19

A speaker system (10) having simple structure, high output power, and desired directivity. A speaker system (10), including a first sound emission surface (G1) that emits a first sound in a first direction (K1); and a second sound emission surface (G2) that emits a second sound in a second direction (K2) that intersects with the first direction (K1) at a predetermined angle. The first and second sounds include at least sounds respectively generated from a common first signal source and different in phase from each other.


Patent
Tei Co. | Date: 2012-10-04

An array speaker system includes a plurality of speaker units that respectively emit sounds in accordance with an input signal and an outer casing that supports the plurality of speaker units. Each speaker unit can be provided with a speaker operable to vibrate a vibrator in accordance with the signal, and a cavity back box that supports the speaker. The cavity back box forms a rear space with the vibrator on the opposite side with respect to the sound emission surface. The array speaker system thus constructed can emit a high power sound with a simple structure and improved stability in acoustic properties.


Patent
Tei Co. | Date: 2013-04-10

There is disclosed an array speaker system including a plurality of speaker units that respectively emit sounds in accordance with an input signal and an outer casing that supports the plurality of speaker units. Each speaker unit is provided with a speaker operable to vibrate a vibrating member in accordance with the signal, and a cavity back box that supports the speaker. The cavity back box forms a rear space with the vibrating member on the opposite side with respect to the sound emission surface. The array speaker system thus constructed can emit a high power sound with a simple structure and improved stability in acoustic properties.

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