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Vittoriosi A.,IMVT KIT | Hecht K.,IMVT KIT | Brandner J.J.,IMVT KIT | Dittmeyer R.,IMVT KIT
Galvanotechnik | Year: 2015

The increasing number of applications of microfluidic devices in many technological fields has raised the question of assessing the correlation between manufacturing processes, employed material and physical-chemical properties of microstructured surfaces. The characterization of roughness for conventional engineering surfaces is a well developed technological field, offering several technological solutions according to the different kind of applications and the information needed. For microstructured systems, however, many of these technologies can not be implemented, or show several limitations which, if not correctly identified, might lead to erroneous conclusions. In this work some of the commonly available surface characterization techniques have been implemented to measure the surface roughness of micromachined surfaces (both structured and non-structured). The recorded roughness values are reported and compared for the different measuring techniques. The results are then discussed to highlight the main limits and strengths of the employed characterization methods, with particular attention to their implementation in the field of microfluidic devices. Source


Vittoriosi A.,IMVT KIT | Hecht K.,IMVT KIT | Brandner J.J.,IMVT KIT | Dittmeyer R.,IMVT KIT
Galvanotechnik | Year: 2015

The increasing number of applications of microfluidic devices in many technological fields has raised the question of assessing the correlation between manufacturing processes, employed material and physicalchemical properties of microstructured surfaces. The characterization of roughness for conventional engineeringsurfacesisawelldevelopedtechnologicalfield, offering several technological solutions according to the different kind of applications and the information needed. For microstructured systems, however, many of these technologies can not be implemented, or show several limitations which, if not correctly identified, might lead to erroneous conclusions. In this work some of the commonly available surface characterization techniques have been implemented to measure the surface roughness of micromachined surfaces (both structured and non-structured). The recorded roughness values are reported and compared for the different measuring techniques. The results are then discussed to highlight the main limits and strengths of the employed characterization methods, with particular attention to their implementation in the field of microfluidic devices. Source


Vittoriosi A.,IMVT KIT | Hecht K.,IMVT KIT | Brandner J.J.,IMVT KIT | Dittmeyer R.,IMVT KIT
Galvanotechnik | Year: 2014

The increasing number of applications of microfluidic devices in many technological fields has raised the question of assessing the correlation between manufacturing processes, employed material and physicalchemical properties of microstructured surfaces. The characterization of roughness for conventional engineering surfaces is a well developed technological field, offering several technological solutions according to the different kind of applications and the information needed. For microstructured systems, however, many of these technologies can not be implemented, or show several limitations which, if not correctly identified, might lead to erroneous conclusions. In this work some of the commonly available surface characterization techniques have been implemented to measure the surface roughness of micromachined surfaces (both structured and non-structured). The recorded roughness values are reported and compared for the different measuring techniques. The results are then discussed to highlight the main limits and strengths of the employed characterization methods, with particular attention to their implementation in the field of microfluidic devices. Source

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