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News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.fishupdate.com

LEADING figures from the aquaculture industry will congregate in Stirling next month to discuss innovations in production methods, fish health and welfare, breeding and genetics and advances in feed technology. The inaugural Aquaculture UK conference, to be held at Stirling University from June 14-15, will feature talks from salmon farmers, shellfish growers, pioneering geneticists, fish vets, feed experts, and regulators. Marine Harvest’s John Richmond will offer advice on the design and building of large scale RAS systems, Adam Hughes of SAMS (Scottish Association for Marine Science) will explain the merits of IMTA, Nicki Holmyard will explore mollusc farming methods, and Stirling’s Andrew Davie will investigate the diversification of farmed species in the UK. Hamish Rodger from the Fish Vet Group will address the challenge of new and emerging finfish disease, while Grant Stentiford of the government body Cefas will look at shellfish health. Feed company Cargill’s Ian Carr will highlight innovations in health feeds, IFFO’s Neil Auchterlonie will tackle the continuing importance of marine ingredients, and Stirling’s Matthew Sprague will report on developments in salmon and trout nutrition. Cutting edge science from the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Norway’s Avaforsk Genetics Centre and Xelect in St Andrews will give delegates up to date insights into new breeding technologies in aquaculture. At the end of day one, Gorjan Nikolik of Rabobank will deliver a finance perspective, and there will be a presentation from Evonik on sea lice treatments. Training and education providers meet on the second day to consider what the industry needs in terms of skills and experience, with presentations from Pisces’ Martyn Haines, Lantra, NAFC Marine Centre, Argyll College, and the universities of St Andrews and Harper Adams. Swansea University and Aberdeen will also be represented, in a special session on networking and knowledge exchange, and four breakout sessions will give participants a chance to consider the long-term growth of the industry. Kicking off the two-day event is keynote speaker Stewart Graham, Gael Force Group managing director and co-chair of the new Industry Leadership Group. And Wednesday evening will see the launch of the Scottish Marine Aquaculture Awards during the conference dinner, all in the Stirling Court Hotel.


Tamari S.,IMTA | Garcia F.,ENGEES | Arciniega-Ambrocio J.I.,ITCh | Porter A.,MECOPAA
Houille Blanche | Year: 2014

Among the non-contact instruments to measure water velocity in open channels, two handheld radars are available on the market since ten years. Due to the lack of information about these instruments, one model was tested in the laboratory and in the field. The radar was able to estimate the velocity of a water surface within [p = 0.95] ± 0.3 m/s at medium velocities (from 0.3 to 3 m/s) and within ± 10 % of the measured value at large velocities (up to at least 6 m/s). Although this is not very accurate, the ease of using handheld radars still makes them attractive to quickly estimate discharge at gauging stations, safely determine water velocity during a flood and investigate how water flows under difficult access conditions. Nevertheless, the tested radar was tending to underestimate the water velocity, above all when it was looking downstream. More studies are necessary to know why. © 2014 Société Hydrotechnique de France .


Gonzalez-Sanchez A.,IMTA | Frausto-Solis J.,UPEMOR | Ojeda-Bustamante W.,IMTA
Scientific World Journal | Year: 2014

Efficient cropping requires yield estimation for each involved crop, where data-driven models are commonly applied. In recent years, some data-driven modeling technique comparisons have been made, looking for the best model to yield prediction. However, attributes are usually selected based on expertise assessment or in dimensionality reduction algorithms. A fairer comparison should include the best subset of features for each regression technique; an evaluation including several crops is preferred. This paper evaluates the most common data-driven modeling techniques applied to yield prediction, using a complete method to define the best attribute subset for each model. Multiple linear regression, stepwise linear regression, M5′ regression trees, and artificial neural networks (ANN) were ranked. The models were built using real data of eight crops sowed in an irrigation module of Mexico. To validate the models, three accuracy metrics were used: the root relative square error (RRSE), relative mean absolute error (RMAE), and correlation factor (R). The results show that ANNs are more consistent in the best attribute subset composition between the learning and the training stages, obtaining the lowest average RRSE (86.04%), lowest average RMAE (8.75%), and the highest average correlation factor (0.63). © 2014 Alberto Gonzalez-Sanchez et al.


Waterhouse A.F.,University of Florida | Valle-Levinson A.,University of Florida | Morales Perez R.A.,IMTA
Continental Shelf Research | Year: 2012

Observations of current velocity, sea surface elevation and vertical profiles of density were obtained in a tropical inlet to determine the effect of a bathymetric depression (hollow) on the tidal flows. Surveys measuring velocity profiles were conducted over a diurnal tidal cycle with mixed spring tides during dry and wet seasons. Depth-averaged tidal velocities during ebb and flood tides behaved according to Bernoulli dynamics, as expected. The dynamic balance of depth-averaged quantities in the along-channel direction was governed by along-channel advection and pressure gradients with baroclinic pressure gradients only being important during the wet season. The vertical structure of the along-channel flow during flood tides exhibited a mid-depth maximum with lateral shear enhanced during the dry season as a result of decreased vertical stratification. During ebb tides, along-channel velocities in the vicinity of the hollow were vertically sheared with a weak return flow at depth due to choking of the flow on the seaward slope of the hollow. The potential energy anomaly, a measure of the amount of energy required to fully mix the water column, showed two peaks in stratification associated with ebb tide and a third peak occurring at the beginning of flood. After the first mid-ebb peak in stratification, ebb flows were constricted on the seaward slope of the hollow resulting in a bottom return flow. The sinking of surface waters and enhanced mixing on the seaward slope of the hollow reduced the potential energy anomaly after maximum ebb. The third peak in stratification during early flood occurred as a result of denser water entering the inlet at mid-depth. This dense water mixed with ambient deep waters increasing the stratification. Lateral shear in the along-channel flow across the hollow allowed trapping of less dense water in the surface layers further increasing stratification. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Van Steenbergen-Weijenburg K.M.,Pro Persona Center for Education and Research Pro | Van Der Feltz-Cornelis C.M.,University of Tilburg | Van Benthem T.B.,Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis | Horn E.K.,Landelijk Centrum Voor Persoonlijkheidsproblematiek | And 8 more authors.
Tijdschrift voor Psychiatrie | Year: 2015

Background: Depression is highly prevalent in patients with chronic physical illnesses. A promising intervention for this group of patients is the collaborative care treatment as developed in the us. AIM: To demonstrate the prevalence of depression and the risk factors of depression in diabetes patients, to describe how the screening for depression can be carried out and to assess whether the collaborative care treatment in the Netherlands is effective. METHOD: A questionnaire was completed every three months in order to determine whether there was an improvement in patients' depression and physical symptoms.The outcomes were analysed by means of the multilevel logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: On the basis of the Patient Health Questionnaire, about 26% of the diabetes patients were found to have a depression.This questionnaire was validated for the measurement of depression in diabetes patients, the best results being found at a cut-off point of 12. In cases of fairly severe depression, collaborative care had no effect on depressive symptoms but did reduce severe physical complications. In cases of more severe depression, collaborative care only had an effect on depressive symptoms, but was not found to have any effect on physical complications. CONCLUSION: There is evidence that collaborative care can reduce depression and physical complications in chronically ill patients. However, more research is needed to find out whether collaborative care can become more effective if it is supplemented with digital methods and group therapy.


PubMed | UPEMOR and IMTA
Type: | Journal: TheScientificWorldJournal | Year: 2014

Efficient cropping requires yield estimation for each involved crop, where data-driven models are commonly applied. In recent years, some data-driven modeling technique comparisons have been made, looking for the best model to yield prediction. However, attributes are usually selected based on expertise assessment or in dimensionality reduction algorithms. A fairer comparison should include the best subset of features for each regression technique; an evaluation including several crops is preferred. This paper evaluates the most common data-driven modeling techniques applied to yield prediction, using a complete method to define the best attribute subset for each model. Multiple linear regression, stepwise linear regression, M5 regression trees, and artificial neural networks (ANN) were ranked. The models were built using real data of eight crops sowed in an irrigation module of Mexico. To validate the models, three accuracy metrics were used: the root relative square error (RRSE), relative mean absolute error (RMAE), and correlation factor (R). The results show that ANNs are more consistent in the best attribute subset composition between the learning and the training stages, obtaining the lowest average RRSE (86.04%), lowest average RMAE (8.75%), and the highest average correlation factor (0.63).


Oban, Scotland, 28-Oct-2016 — /EuropaWire/ — A developing form of aquaculture that sees seaweed and filter-feeding shellfish grown next to traditional fish farms can help deliver greater productivity and reduce environmental impact, say a research group led by SAMS researchers. The European-based researchers involved in the four-year IDREEM project, which ended this month, believe Integrated Multi-trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) could potentially address a number of challenges in the flat-lining European aquaculture industry. Whereas traditional aquaculture/mariculture practice typically sees different types of organisms grown separately, IMTA is a concept where different species are grown together in such a way that the invertebrates and/or plants can recycle the nutrients that are lost from the culture of the other species. “The whole idea of IDREEM was to put the industry at the centre of the project,” said project co-ordinator Dr Adam Hughes (pictured), head of aquaculture at SAMS. “It wasn’t about just research, but rather about mapping and benchmarking industry as it developed different IMTA production systems in Europe. “After four years of hands-on practical experience, the project has achieved a better understanding for aquaculture producers. Research and has shown that, even though the conditions are not yet fully in place in Europe for the wide scale adoption of IMTA, there is a growing commercial interest, consumer demand, and an economic and environment case for the adoption of IMTA, as well as clear policy drivers for its future development.” The work carried out by 15 partners across Europe has gone a long way to develop IMTA into a practical proposition for European aquaculture. Through the life of the project seven different fin-fish producers have IMTA operations in place, and the first IMTA products have been brought to market and sold. However, several barriers still hamper the full commercial uptake of IMTA. Dr Hughes said: “We spent a lot of time trying to understand the regulatory framework for the development of IMTA. There is a policy driver for IMTA in national and European policy but there seems to be a gap between the policy and the regulation. For some countries the process of getting a licence for IMTA can be smooth and for others it can take several years.” Among the findings from the project was a need to develop a market for aquaculture seaweed in Europe, as seaweed is a crucial component of most IMTA systems. For seaweeds to make a significant contribution to nutrient reduction they need to be grown in larger volumes than has been practised to date. The findings from IDREEM are detaileded in the final project publication “Beyond Monoculture – Developing Integrated Multi-trophic Aquaculture in Europe”, which was released on the occasion of the IMTA session at the recent Aquaculture Europe 2016 in Edinburgh. BBC Scotland’s Landward produced a feature on IMTA following a visit with Dr Hughes to the IMTA site on Loch Fyne, Argyll, run by the Scottish Salmon Company, a commercial partner in the IDREEM project. It can be viewed here on BBC iPlayer until November 25. About IDREEM IDREEM (Increasing Industrial Resource Efficiency in European Mariculture) is a European research project launched in 2012 to protect the long-term sustainability of European aquaculture by developing and demonstrating a new innovative production technology, Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture or IMTA. The €5.7 million project is coordinated by the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) and delivered in collaboration with fourteen industrial and research partners from across Europe. The project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no. 308571.


News Article | November 25, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Wiers Fleet Partners has announced the opening of a new service center located between E. Woodlawn Avenue & Hiawatha Avenue near I-65 and I-264 in Louisville, KY. Wiers repairs and maintains all makes and all models of light, medium and heavy-duty commercial vehicles and the 15,000 square foot facility is scheduled to open in December 2016. The Louisville location is the fourth Wiers Fleet Partners service center to open in the past three years adding to the two locations in Indianapolis, one in La Porte County and the three well-established Wiers International Trucks locations in Northern Indiana - Plymouth, Lafayette and Logansport. "We’ve been in this business over fifty years and know that what our customers really need is uptime for their fleet. And that’s why we’re connecting with our customers in a new way, utilizing advanced technology that provides real time diagnosis, “said Tom Wiers, Owner & President of Wiers. Wiers invests heavily in tooling, technology and the advancement of their employees. Technicians average more than 40 hours of training annually. Wiers technicians have won 29 awards since 2011, including an incredible seven at this year's IMTA Technician Competition in Indianapolis. As a result, 99.6% of the time Wiers fixes it right the first time increasing vehicle uptime for their customers. Wiers Fleet Partners is not just another vendor. They promote relationships with their customers as well as the communities they serve. A portion of the sale from each job completed in the new Louisville location will be given to Ronald McDonald House Charities to help families stay close to their children receiving care. Wiers Fleet Partners is part of the Wiers Corporation headquartered in Plymouth, IN, which includes four Wiers Fleet Partners service centers and three Wiers International Trucks locations. Wiers has been a repair, maintenance and truck sales leader for two generations and proudly celebrated their 50th anniversary in 2014. All these years, Wiers has taken great pride in being active in local communities and helping to keep the economy rolling. For more information, please visit http://www.wiers.com.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Accountex USA announced Amy Vetter as presenter of a new course, Creating a Supportive Network with and for Women, at the 13th annual accounting technology conference and expo. Vetter will share five lessons learned from women she admires and how those lessons can empower attendees to build an infrastructure that helps women thrive while establishing a track to leadership. The session will drive awareness to key business skills needed for success in sales, marketing, and client service. Amy Vetter, CPA.CITP, CGMA is the Global Vice President, Education & Head of Accounting, USA at Xero. Amy is an advocate and evangelist for the accounting profession and entrepreneurship. She has been recognized as a Top 100 Most Influential Person in Accounting Today’s Listing multiple times, been nominated as a “Women to Watch” by CALCPA, is an AICPA IMTA Executive Committee Member and CITP Champion, CALCPA MAP State Committee member, CALCPA Women’s Leadership Forum Conference Committee member and selected by The CPA Technology Advisor as an outstanding 40 under 40 technology-based accountant in 2006 and 2009. "When it comes to hiring strong female accounting talent, there is no cookie-cutter approach. While many accounting firms correctly recognize the need for female talent in their practice, too many treat related recruiting and retention activities as one-size fits all," Vetter says. "Having a supportive network can be one of the most important ingredients to your success, and it starts from the ground up. During my Accountex session, I will share some of my own career lessons to help empower men and women leaders to build an infrastructure that helps women thrive and establishes a track to leadership. You will also walk away with a better awareness of the key business skills needed to succeed in Sales, Marketing and Client Service." Accountex USA provides a four-day learning experience that focuses around the technology that moves accounting forward as well as the business processes and organizational success needed in the marketplace. As an independent conference, the content offers more than a single perspective on solutions. The accounting technology expo brings together the largest selection of solutions and offers professionals face-to-face time to learn about the latest upcoming trends available from cloud accounting innovators. The conference is the premier event of the year for the accounting and financial professionals and the add-on developer community. Sponsorship opportunities are enhanced through the AccountingWEB and Accountex partnership to provide maximum engagement with decision makers. Keynote speakers include: David Kotz, former Inspector General of the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission and Managing Partner at Berkeley Research Group, Debbie Rich-Walker, Senior Finance Manager at Home Depot, Dave Kerpen, Founder and CEO of LikeableLocal and a New York Times Best-Selling Author, Doug Sleeter, Founder of The Sleeter Group, Joe Woodard, Founder of Woodard Events and Consulting, Andy Lark, Chief Marketing Officer of Xero, and Geni Whitehouse, CEO at Even a Nerd. Accountex will be held at the Mirage Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada November 15-18, 2016. Registration is now open at AccountexUSA.com. About Accountex Accountex is the leading independent expo and conference focusing on accounting technology. Accountex USA focuses on the technology that moves accounting forward as well as the business processes and organizational success needed in the marketplace. It is an independent conference meaning that it offers more than one viewpoint of solutions. Accountex features the most accounting technology solutions at one major event, plus latest trends and the traditional technologies that still dominate, without any focus on a singular suite of products. ###

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