London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom

Imperial College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom. As a former constituent college of the federal University of London, it became fully independent during the commemoration of its centenary on 9 July 2007. Imperial has grown through mergers, including with St Mary's Hospital Medical School , the National Heart and Lung Institute and the Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School . Imperial College Business School was established in 2003 and its building opened by the Queen of England in 2004.Imperial is organised into four main faculties: science, engineering, medicine and business; within the school there are over 40 departments, institutes and research centres. Imperial has around 13,500 students and 3,330 academic and research staff. Imperial's main campus is located in the South Kensington area of London, with additional campuses in Chelsea, Hammersmith, Paddington, Silwood Park, Wye College, and Singapore, making it one of the largest estates of any UK tertiary institution.Imperial is a major centre for biomedical research with the research staff having a total income of £822 million in 2012/13. Imperial is a founding member of the Francis Crick Institute and Imperial College Healthcare. Imperial is a member of the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the European University Association, the Association of MBAs, the G5, the League of European Research Universities, Oak Ridge Associated Universities and the Russell Group. Along with Cambridge and Oxford, Imperial, forms a corner of the "golden triangle" of British universities.Imperial is one of the most selective British universities. Imperial is consistently ranked among the top universities in the world, ranking 2nd in the 2014/15 QS World University Rankings and 9th in the 2014/15 Times Higher Education World University Rankings. In a corporate study carried out by The New York Times, its graduates were one of the most valued globally. Imperial's alumni and faculty include 15 Nobel laureates, 2 Fields Medalists, 70 Fellows of the Royal Society, 82 Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering, and 78 Fellows of the Academy of Medical science. Wikipedia.


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Postma D.S.,University of Groningen | Bush A.,Imperial College London | Van Den Berge M.,University of Groningen
The Lancet | Year: 2015

Summary Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is mainly a smoking-related disorder and affects millions of people worldwide, with a large effect on individual patients and society as a whole. Although the disease becomes clinically apparent around the age of 40-50 years, its origins can begin very early in life. Different risk factors in very early life - ie, in utero and during early childhood - drive the development of clinically apparent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in later life. In discussions of which risk factors drive chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, it is important to realise that the disease is very heterogeneous and at present is largely diagnosed by lung function only. In this Review, we will discuss the evidence for risk factors for the various phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during different stages of life. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 4.08M | Year: 2014

High Performance Embedded and Distributed Systems (HiPEDS), ranging from implantable smart sensors to secure cloud service providers, offer exciting benefits to society and great opportunities for wealth creation. Although currently UK is the world leader for many technologies underpinning such systems, there is a major threat which comes from the need not only to develop good solutions for sharply focused problems, but also to embed such solutions into complex systems with many diverse aspects, such as power minimisation, performance optimisation, digital and analogue circuitry, security, dependability, analysis and verification. The narrow focus of conventional UK PhD programmes cannot bridge the skills gap that would address this threat to the UKs leadership of HiPEDS. The proposed Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) aims to train a new generation of leaders with a systems perspective who can transform research and industry involving HiPEDS. The CDT provides a structured and vibrant training programme to train PhD students to gain expertise in a broad range of system issues, to integrate and innovate across multiple layers of the system development stack, to maximise the impact of their work, and to acquire creativity, communication, and entrepreneurial skills. The taught programme comprises a series of modules that combine technical training with group projects addressing team skills and system integration issues. Additional courses and events are designed to cover students personal development and career needs. Such a comprehensive programme is based on aligning the research-oriented elements of the training programme, an industrial internship, and rigorous doctoral research. Our focus in this CDT is on applying two cross-layer research themes: design and optimisation, and analysis and verification, to three key application areas: healthcare systems, smart cities, and the information society. Healthcare systems cover implantable and wearable sensors and their operation as an on-body system, interactions with hospital and primary care systems and medical personnel, and medical imaging and robotic surgery systems. Smart cities cover infrastructure monitoring and actuation components, including smart utilities and smart grid at unprecedented scales. Information society covers technologies for extracting, processing and distributing information for societal benefits; they include many-core and reconfigurable systems targeting a wide range of applications, from vision-based domestic appliances to public and private cloud systems for finance, social networking, and various web services. Graduates from this CDT will be aware of the challenges faced by industry and their impact. Through their broad and deep training, they will be able to address the disconnect between research prototypes and production environments, evaluate research results in realistic situations, assess design tradeoffs based on both practical constraints and theoretical models, and provide rapid translation of promising ideas into production environments. They will have the appropriate systems perspective as well as the vision and skills to become leaders in their field, capable of world-class research and its exploitation to become a global commercial success.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.1.4-3 | Award Amount: 9.64M | Year: 2012

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 8% of the European population and ultimately results in renal failure due to progressive fibrosis. CDK carries a high mortality risk and the number of affected people rises, increasing the demand on renal replacement therapies while the number of available donor organs stays stable. The STELLAR consortium proposes to develop an alternative to renal replacement therapy, based on the repair capacity of newly discovered kidney mesenchymal stromal cells (kMSCs). By injecting kMSC into affected kidneys, we expect to stop kidney fibrosis and induce tissue repair, ultimately leading to the restoration of normal kidney function. The STELLAR consortium will develop protocols for up scalable, high quality isolation of kMSCs and precisely characterize kMSC function in comparison to other MSCs. test kMSCs in several murine renal disease models, to study their effects on fibrosis and tissue repair. discover mechanisms of kidney repair. invest in developing the technology necessary for up scaled isolation and quality control. The STELLAR consortium combines Australian experts on kMSC isolation and characterisation with European experts on renal failure and compounds the state-of-the-art knowledge, facilities and experience needed to develop and validate this novel form of renal therapy. The inclusion of experienced SMEs, with great technical and scientific know-how about assay and protocol development, further strengthens the consortium and will ensure not only the inclusion of new technology, but also a quick translation from bench to clinical application. In conclusion, the STELLAR consortium is capable of developing and pre clinical validation of this new cellular therapy for CDK, based on a new understanding of stromal cells and fibroblast function, while also providing the technology required for rapid, large scale application of the therapy after clinical validation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

This project is the second in the series of EC-financed parts of the Graphene Flagship. The Graphene Flagship is a 10 year research and innovation endeavour with a total project cost of 1,000,000,000 euros, funded jointly by the European Commission and member states and associated countries. The first part of the Flagship was a 30-month Collaborative Project, Coordination and Support Action (CP-CSA) under the 7th framework program (2013-2016), while this and the following parts are implemented as Core Projects under the Horizon 2020 framework. The mission of the Graphene Flagship is to take graphene and related layered materials from a state of raw potential to a point where they can revolutionise multiple industries. This will bring a new dimension to future technology a faster, thinner, stronger, flexible, and broadband revolution. Our program will put Europe firmly at the heart of the process, with a manifold return on the EU investment, both in terms of technological innovation and economic growth. To realise this vision, we have brought together a larger European consortium with about 150 partners in 23 countries. The partners represent academia, research institutes and industries, which work closely together in 15 technical work packages and five supporting work packages covering the entire value chain from materials to components and systems. As time progresses, the centre of gravity of the Flagship moves towards applications, which is reflected in the increasing importance of the higher - system - levels of the value chain. In this first core project the main focus is on components and initial system level tasks. The first core project is divided into 4 divisions, which in turn comprise 3 to 5 work packages on related topics. A fifth, external division acts as a link to the parts of the Flagship that are funded by the member states and associated countries, or by other funding sources. This creates a collaborative framework for the entire Flagship.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.90M | Year: 2015

Development of fuel injection equipment (FIE) able to reduce pollutant emissions from liquid-fueled transportation and power generation systems is a top industrial priority in order to meet the forthcoming EU 2020 emission legislations. However, design of new FIE is currently constrained by the incomplete physical understanding of complex micro-scale processes, such as in-nozzle cavitation, primary and secondary atomization. Unfortunately, todays computing power does not allow for an all-scale analysis of these processes. The proposed program aims to develop a large eddy simulation (LES) CFD model that will account for the influence of unresolved sub-grid-scale (SGS) processes to engineering scales at affordable computing time scales. The bridging parameter between SGS and macro-scales flow processes is the surface area generation/destruction occurring during fuel atomisation; relevant SGS closure models will be developed through tailored experiments and DNS and will be implemented into the LES model predicting the macroscopic spray development as function of the in-nozzle flow and surrounding air conditions. Validation of the new simulation tool, currently missing from todays state-of-the-art models, will be performed against new benchmark experimental data to be obtained as part of the programme, in addition to those provided by the industrial partners. This will demonstrate the applicability of the model as an engineering design tool suitable for IC engines, gas turbines, fuel burners and even rocket engine fuel injectors. The proposed research and training programme will be undertaken by 15ESRs funded by the EU and one ESR funded independently from an Australian partner; ESRs will be recruited/seconded by universities, research institutes and multinational fuel injection and combustion systems manufacturers that will represent in the best possible way the international, interdisciplinary and intersectoral requirements of the Marie Curie Action guidelines.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-26-2014 | Award Amount: 4.52M | Year: 2015

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) portraits a high need and challenge for self-management by young patients: a complex illness with a high and increasing prevalence, a regimen that needs adaptation to patients condition and activities, and serious risks for complications and reduced life expectations. When patients do not acquire the knowledge, skills and habits to adhere to their diabetes regimen at childhood, these risks increase suddenly at adolescence. Current mHealth applications have their own specific value for self-management, but are unable to deliver the required comprehensive, prolonged, personalised and context-sensitive support and to reduce these risks persistently. We aim at a Personal Assistant for healthy Lifestyle (PAL) that provides such support, assisting the child, health professional and parent to advance the self-management of children with type 1 diabetes aged 7 - 14, so that an adequate shared patient-caregiver responsibility for childs diabetes regimen is established before adolescence. The PAL system is composed of a social robot, its (mobile) avatar, and an extendable set of (mobile) health applications (diabetes diary, educational quizzes, sorting games, etc.), which all connect to a common knowledge-base and reasoning mechanism. The robot and avatar act as a childs pal or companion, whereas health professionals and parents are supported by, respectively, an Authoring & Control and a Monitor & Inform tool. The PAL-project will assess the benefits of the behavioural change on patients health conditions, and the profits for the caregivers in longitudinal field experiments. The consortium provides the required network, expertise and tools for this research: (a) a knowledge-driven co-design methodology and tool, (b) medical, human factors and technical expertise, (c) end-user participation and (d) initial PAL building-blocks.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.82M | Year: 2015

The impacts of climate change, and warming in particular, on natural ecosystems remain poorly understood, and research to date has focused on individual species (e.g. range shifts of polar bears). Multispecies systems (food webs, ecosystems), however, can possess emergent properties that can only be understood using a system-level perspective. Within a given food web, the microbial world is the engine that drives key ecosystem processes, biogeochemical cycles (e.g. the carbon-cycle) and network properties, but has been hidden from view due to difficulties with identifying which microbes are present and what they are doing. The recent revolution in Next Generation Sequencing has removed this bottleneck and we can now open the microbial black box to characterise the metagenome (who is there?) and metatranscriptome (what are they doing?) of the community for the first time. These advances will allow us to address a key overarching question: should we expect a global response to global warming? There are bodies of theory that suggest this might be the case, including the Metabolic Theory of Ecology and the Everything is Everywhere hypothesis of global microbial biogeography, yet these ideas have yet to be tested rigorously at appropriate scales and in appropriate experimental contexts that allow us to identify patterns and causal relationships in real multispecies systems. We will assess the impacts of warming across multiple levels of biological organisation, from genes to food webs and whole ecosystems, using geothermally warmed freshwaters in 5 high-latitude regions (Svalbard, Iceland, Greenland, Alaska, Kamchatka), where warming is predicted to be especially rapid,. Our study will be the first to characterise the impacts of climate change on multispecies systems at such an unprecedented scale. Surveys of these sentinel systems will be complemented with modelling and experiments conducted in these field sites, as well as in 100s of large-scale mesocosms (artificial streams and ponds) in the field and 1,000s of microcosms of robotically-assembled microbial communities in the laboratory. Our novel genes-to-ecosystems approach will allow us to integrate measures of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. For instance, we will quantify key functional genes as well as quantifying which genes are switched on (the metatranscriptome) in addition to measuring ecosystem functioning (e.g. processes related to the carbon cycle). We will also measure the impacts of climate change on the complex networks of interacting species we find in nature - what Darwin called the entangled bank - because food webs and other types of networks can produce counterintuitive responses that cannot be predicted from studying species in isolation. One general objective is to assess the scope for biodiversity insurance and resilience of natural systems in the face of climate change. We will combine our intercontinental surveys with natural experiments, bioassays, manipulations and mathematical models to do this. For instance, we will characterise how temperature-mediated losses to biodiversity can compromise key functional attributes of the gene pool and of the ecosystem as a whole. There is an assumption in the academic literature and in policy that freshwater ecosystems are relatively resilient because the apparently huge scope for functional redundancy could allow for compensation for species loss in the face of climate change. However, this has not been quantified empirically in natural systems, and errors in estimating the magnitude of functional redundancy could have substantial environmental and economic repercussions. The research will address a set of key specific questions and hypotheses within our 5 themed Workpackages, of broad significance to both pure and applied ecology, and which also combine to provide a more holistic perspective than has ever been attempted previously.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.3.3-1 | Award Amount: 31.38M | Year: 2014

Far from receding, the threats posed by infections with epidemic potential grow ever greater. Although Europe has amongst the best healthcare systems in the world, and also the worlds supreme researchers in this field, we lack co-ordination and linkage between networks that is required to respond fast to new threats. This consortium of consortia will streamline our response, using primary and secondary healthcare to detect cases with pandemic potential and to activate dynamic rapid investigation teams that will deploy shared resources across Europe to mitigate the impact of future pandemics on European health, infrastructure and economic integrity. If funded, PREPARE will transform Europes response to future severe epidemics or pandemics by providing infrastructure, co-ordination and integration of existing clinical research networks, both in community and hospital settings. It represents a new model of collaboration and will provide a one-stop shop for policy makers, public health agencies, regulators and funders of research into pathogens with epidemic potential. It will do this by mounting interepidemic (peace time) patient oriented clinical trials in children and in adults, investigations of the pathogenesis of relevant infectious diseases and facilitate the development of sophisticated state-of-the-art near-patient diagnostics. We will develop pre-emptive solutions to ethical, administrative, regulatory and logistical bottlenecks that prevent a rapid response in the face of new threats. We will provide education and training not only to the members of the network, but also to external opinion leaders, funders and policy makers thereby streamlining our future response. By strengthening and integrating interepidemic research networks, PREPARE will enable the rapid coordinated deployment of Europes elite clinical investigators, resulting in a highly effective response to future outbreaks based on solid scientific advances.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.81M | Year: 2015

Mathematical, computational models are central in biomedical and biological systems engineering; models enable (i) mechanistically justifying experimental results via current knowledge and (ii) generating new testable hypotheses or novel intervention methods. SyMBioSys is a joint academic/industrial training initiative supporting the convergence of engineering, biological and computational sciences. The consortiums mutual goal is developing a new generation of innovative and entrepreneurial early-stage researchers (ESRs) to develop and exploit cutting-edge dynamic (kinetic) mathematical models for biomedical and biotechnological applications. SyMBioSys integrates: (i) six academic beneficiaries with a strong record in biomedical and biological systems engineering research, these include four universities and two research centres; (ii) four industrial beneficiaries including key players in developing simulation software for process systems engineering, metabolic engineering and industrial biotechnology; (iii) three partner organisations from pharmaceutical, biotechnological and entrepreneurial sectors. SyMBioSys is committed to supporting the establishment of a Biological Systems Engineering research community by stimulating programme coordination via joint activities. The main objectives of this initiative are: * Developing new algorithms and methods for reverse engineering and identifying dynamic models of biosystems and bioprocesses * Developing new model-based optimization algorithms for exploiting dynamic models of biological systems (e.g. predicting behavior in biological networks, identifying design principles and selecting optimal treatment intervention) * Developing software tools, implementing the preceding novel algorithms, using state-of-the-art software engineering practices to ensure usability in biological systems engineering research and practice * Applying the new algorithms and software tools to biomedical and biological test cases.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.2-1 | Award Amount: 9.99M | Year: 2014

Water and water-related services are major components of the human wellbeing, and as such are major factors of socio-economic development in Europe; yet freshwater systems are under threat by a variety of stressors (organic and inorganic pollution, geomorphological alterations, land cover change, water abstraction, invasive species and pathogens. Some stressors, such as water scarcity, can be a stressor on its own because of its structural character, and drive the effects of other stressors. The relevance of water scarcity as a stressor is more important in semi-arid regions, such as the Mediterranean basin, which are characterized by highly variable river flows and the occurrence of low flows. This has resulted in increases in frequency and magnitude of extreme flow events. Furthermore, in other European regions such as eastern Germany, western Poland and England, water demand exceeds water availability and water scarcity has become an important management issue. Water scarcity is most commonly associated with inappropriate water management, with resulting river flow reductions. It has become one of the most important drivers of change in freshwater ecosystems. Conjoint occurrence of a myriad of stressors (chemical, geomorphological, biological) under water scarcity will produce novel and unfamiliar synergies and most likely very pronounced effects. Within this context, GLOBAQUA has assembled a multidisciplinary team of leading scientists in the fields of hydrology, chemistry, ecology, ecotoxicology, economy, sociology, engineering and modeling in order to study the interaction of multiple stressors within the frame of strong pressure on water resources. The aim is to achieve a better understanding how current management practices and policies could be improved by identifying the main drawbacks and alternatives.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 517.50K | Year: 2016

The vision for the 5th generation of mobile networks (5G) includes at its heart the Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm, leading to a new era of connectivity where billions of devices exchange data and instill intelligence in our everyday life. The EU has set out to play a leading role in developing 5G technologies by consolidating and building upon the most important research and innovation results attained in previous research programs. Nevertheless, 5G is still in its early research stages. Various issues must be resolved before it can become a reality: we need to join forces across countries, continents, and sectors. The objective of the TACTILENet project is to bring together the complementary expertise of European and third-country partners in order to lay the foundations for addressing basic issues in several facets of 5G networking. The cross-fertilization among partners will contribute to the ongoing research efforts by jointly identifying ambitious yet feasible goals for 5G system, addressing some of the fundamental research problems in achieving these goals, and finally, by designing and analyzing a suite of protocols. Given the size of our consortium and the timeframe of the project, we will focus on some of the most promising directions, such as network densification, energy efficiency/harvesting and short blocklength communications. The consortium brings together expertise from all of the above research directions. Each partner will bring along its expertise in different thrusts, and the project will develop a unifying framework for a systematic study of the Internet of Things within the 5G framework capturing these clearly interrelated research areas. With its suggested mobility plan, the project aspires to strengthen collaboration among partners, exploit complementarities in expertise, educate young researchers and ultimately create a solid basis for fruitful cooperation, going beyond the time-frame of this project.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: STFC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 879.19K | Year: 2016

How from a cloud of dust and gas did we arrive at a planet capable of supporting life? This is one of the most fundamental of questions, and engages everyone from school children to scientists. We now know much of the answer: We know that stars, such as our Sun, form by the collapse of interstellar clouds of dust and gas. We know that planets, such as Earth, are constructed in a disk around their host star known as the planetary nebula, formed by the rotation of the collapsing cloud of dust and gas. We know that 4.5 billion years ago in the solar nebula, surrounding the young Sun, all the objects in our Solar System were created through a process called accretion. And among all those bodies the only habitable world yet discovered on which life evolved is Earth. There is, however, much that we still do not know about how our Solar System formed. Why, for example, are all the planets so different? Why is Venus an inferno with a thick carbon dioxide atmosphere, Mars a frozen rock with a thin atmosphere, and Earth a haven for life? The answer lies in events that predated the assembly of these planets; it lies in the early history of the nebula and the events that occurred as fine-dust stuck together to form larger objects known as planetesimals; and in how those planetesimals changed through collisions, heating and the effects of water to become the building blocks of planets. Our research will follow the evolution of planetary materials from the origins of the first dust grains in the protoplanetary disk, through the assembly of planetesimals within the solar nebula to the modification of these objects as and after they became planets. Evidence preserved in meteorites provides a record of our Solar Systems evolution. Meteorites, together with cosmic dust particles, retain the fine-dust particles from the solar nebula. These dust grains are smaller than a millionth of a metre but modern microanalysis can expose their minerals and compositions. We will study the fine-grained components of meteorites and cosmic dust to investigate how fine-dust began accumulating in the solar nebula; how heating by an early hot nebula and repeated short heating events from collisions affected aggregates of dust grains; and whether magnetic fields helped control the distribution of dust in the solar nebula. We will also use numerical models to simulate how the first, fluffy aggregates of dust were compacted to become rock. As well as the rocky and metallic materials that make up the planets, our research will examine the source of Earths water and the fate of organic materials that were crucial to the origins of life. By analysing the isotopes of the volatile elements Zn, Cd and Te in meteorites and samples of Earth, Moon and Mars we will establish the source and timing of water and other volatiles delivered to the planets in the inner Solar System. In addition, through newly developed methods we can trace the history of organic matter in meteorites from their formation in interstellar space, through the solar nebula and into planetesimals. Reading the highly sensitive record in organic matter will reveal how cosmic chemistry furnished the Solar System with the raw materials for life. Once the planets finally formed, their materials continued to change by surface processes such as impacts and the flow of water. Our research will examine how impacts of asteroids and comets shaped planetary crusts and whether this bombardment endangered or aided the emergence of life. We will also study the planet Mars, which provides a second example of a planetary body on which life could have appeared. Imagery of ancient lakes on Mars will reveal a crucial period in the planets history, when global climate change transformed the planet into an arid wasteland, to evaluate the opportunity for organisms to adapt and survive and identify targets for future rover and sample return missions.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 2.06M | Year: 2016

Medicine is undergoing a simultaneous shift at the levels of the individual and the population: we have unprecedented tools for precision monitoring and intervention in individual health and we also have high-resolution behavioural and social data. Precision medicine seeks to deploy therapies that are sensitive to the particular genetic, lifestyle and environmental circumstances of each patient: understanding how best to use these numerous features about each patient is a profound mathematical challenge. We propose to build upon the mathematical, computational and biomedical strengths at Imperial to create a Centre for the Mathematics of Precision Healthcare revolving around the theme of multiscale networks for data-rich precision healthcare and public health. Our Centre proposes to use mathematics to unify individual-level precision medicine with public health by placing high-dimensional individual data and refined interventions in their social network context. Individual health cannot be separated from its behavioural and social context; for instance, highly targeted interventions against a cancer can be undermined by metabolic diseases caused by a dietary behaviour which co-varies with social network structure. Whether we want to tackle chronic disease or the diseases of later life, we must simultaneously consider the joint substrates of the individual together with their social network for transmission of behaviour and disease. We propose to tackle the associated mathematical challenges under the proposed Centre bringing to bear particular strengths of Imperials mathematical research in networks and dynamics, stochastic processes and analysis, control and optimisation, inference and data representation, to the formulation and analysis of mathematical questions at the interface of individual-level personalised medicine and public health, and specifically to the data-rich characterisation of disease progression and transmission, controlled intervention and healthcare provision, placing precision interventions in their wider context. The programme will be initiated and sustained on core research projects and will expand its portfolio of themes and researchers through open calls for co-funded projects and pump-priming initiatives. Our initial set of projects will engage healthcare and clinical resources at Imperial including: (i) patient journeys for disease states in cancer and their successive hospital admissions; multi-omics data and imaging characterisations of (ii) cardiomyopathies and (iii) dementia and co-morbidities; (iv) national population dynamics for epidemiological and epidemics simulation data from Public Health; social networks and (v) health beliefs and (vi) health policy debate. The initial core projects will build upon embedded computational capabilities and data expertise, and will thus concentrate on the development of mathematical methodologies including: sparse state-space methods for the characterisation of disease progression in high-dimensional data using transition graphs in discrete spaces; time-varying networks and control for epidemics data; geometrical similarity graphs to link imaging and omics data for disease progression; stochastic processes and community detection from NHS patient data wedding behavioural and social network data with personal health indicators; statistical learning for the analysis of stratified medicine. The mathematical techniques used to address these requirements will need to combine, among others, ingredients from dynamical and stochastic systems with graph-theoretical notions, sparse statistical learning, inference and optimisation. The Centre will be led by Mathematics but researchers in the Centre span mathematical, biomedical, clinical and computational expertise.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 2.52M | Year: 2013

We currently make more than just fuel from petroleum refining. Many of the plastics, solvents and other products that are used in everyday life are derived from these non-renewable resources. Our research programme aims to replace many of the common materials used as plastics with alternatives created from plants. This will enable us to tie together the UKs desire to move to non-petroleum fuel sources (e.g. biofuels) with our ability to produce renewable polymers and related products. Plant cell walls are made up of two main components: carbohydrate polymers (long chains of sugars) and lignin, which is the glue holding plants together. We will first develop methods of separating these two components using sustainable solvents called ionic liquids. Ionic liquids are salts which are liquids at room temperature, enabling a variety of chemical transformations to be carried out under consitions not normally available to traditional organic solvents. These ionic liquids also reduce pollution as they have no vapours and can be made from non-toxic, non-petroleum based resources. We will take the isolated carbohydrate polymers and break them down into simple sugars using enzymes and then further convert those sugars into building blocks for plastics using a variety of novel catalytic materials specifically designed for this process. The lignin stream will also be broken down and rebuilt into new plastics that can replace common materials. All of these renewable polymers will be used in a wide range of consumer products, including packaging materials, plastic containers and construction materials. The chemical feedstocks that we are creating will be flexible (used for chemical, material and fuel synthesis), safe (these feedstocks are predominantly non-toxic) and sustainable (most of the developed products are biodegradable). This will help reduce the overall environmental impact of the material economy in the UK. The chemistry that we will use focusses on creating highly energy efficient and low-cost ways of making these materials without producing large amounts of waste. We are committed to only developing future manufacturing routes that are benign to the environment in which we all live. In addition, natural material sources often have properties that are superior to those created using artificial means. We plan to exploit these advantages of natural resources in order to produce both replacements for current products and new products with improved performance. This will make our synthetic routes both environmentally responsible and economically advantageous. The UK has an opportunity to take an international lead in this area due to the accumulation of expertise within this country. The overall goal of this project is to develop sustainable manufacturing routes that will stimulate new UK businesses and environmentally responsible means of making common, high value materials. We will bring together scientific experts in designing processes, manufacturing plastics, growing raw biomass resources and developing new chemistries. The flexibility of resources is vital to the success of this endeavour, as no single plant biomass can be used for manufacturing on a year-round basis. Together with experienced leaders of responsible manufacturing industries, we will develop new ways of making everyday materials in a sustainable and economically beneficial way. The result of this research will be a fundamental philosophical shift to our material, chemical, and energy economy. The technologies proposed in this work will help break our dependence on rapidly depleting fossil resources and enable us to become both sustainable and self-sufficient. This will result in greater security, less pollution, and a much more reliable and responsible UK economy.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 13.53K | Year: 2016

It is widely recognised that ecosystems provide numerous services that are of benefit to humans but, in decisions regarding land and resource use, these tend to be overlooked. Within towns and cities this is particularly the case as nature is often considered to be absent in urban areas. However, as nearly 80% of the UK population live in urban areas there is considerable potential for improvements in ecosystem services to have a large impact on quality of life. As a result the Defra funded Ecosystem Services in the Urban Water Environment (ESUWE) project has begun to apply an ecosystem services approach to demonstrate the benefits that improvements in the urban water environment can have. It has also been recognised that a collaborative approach to decision making assists with the integrated planning that is required for sustainable catchment management. Therefore, the work of ESUWE also aims to provide tools to communicate and engage stakeholders in order to facilitate a participatory approach to catchment management. The ESUWE project has identified numerous ecosystem services provided in urban environments and developed metrics to quantify the costs and benefits associated with these. It is now working in four demonstration areas of varying sizes to map and evaluate ecosystem services and to pilot use in local catchment planning. It is hoped that by communicating information about benefits of environmental improvements, decisions can be better informed and that by mapping ecosystem services, areas where interventions will result in multiple-benefits can be identified and prioritised. Throughout the ESUWE project, Green Infrastructure (GI) has been highlighted as being important for delivering benefits to urban societies along with providing environmental and hydrological improvements. Therefore, the potential to expand the scope of the work beyond those directly involved with catchment planning has been identified. The Innovation Project will enable the application of the research conducted under the ESUWE project to meet the needs of a wider range of end users such as local nature partnership, local planning authorities and construction companies to be investigated so that the impact of the work can be increased. The Innovation Project will facilitate co-development of an ecosystem services mapping approach to the planning of GI with those responsible for land use decisions at local and national levels. This will ensure that the needs of end users are incorporated into the development of decision support tools that facilitate GI planning and help create standardised metrics that can express the benefits of GI for use in differing sectors. Work in four demonstration areas will explore the practical application of the ecosystem services approach, demonstrating the benefits provided by GI and identifying opportunities for these to be increased. This will improve strategic understanding so that the effects of potential land use decisions on levels of services provided in urban area can be explored. This will help to provide an evidence base that can inform decisions regarding trade-offs and promote interventions that provide increased and multiple benefits. The Innovation Project will also result in case studies quantifying the value of GI which can be used to promote the need for increased considerations of its provision in land use decision at both local and national levels. A partnership approach will also identify how mapping can aid integrated local decision making to support other place based initiatives. Finally, by considering how GI can be implemented in a way that delivers multiple benefits, best practice will be identified and promoted.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-22-2014 | Award Amount: 3.64M | Year: 2015

Automatic Sentiment Estimation in the Wild


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 4.16M | Year: 2014

Recently, an influential American business magazine, Forbes, chose Quantum Engineering as one of its top 10 majors (degree programmes) for 2022. According to Forbes magazine (September 2012): a need is going to arise for specialists capable of taking advantage of quantum mechanical effects in electronics and other products. We propose to renew the CDT in Controlled Quantum Dynamics (CQD) to continue its success in training students to develop quantum technologies in a collaborative manner between experiment and theory and across disciplines. With the ever growing demand for compactness, controllability and accuracy, the size of opto-electronic devices in particular, and electronic devices in general, is approaching the realm where only fully quantum mechanical theory can explain the fluctuations in (and limitations of) these devices. Pushing the frontiers of the very small and very fast looks set to bring about a revolution in our understanding of many fundamental processes in e.g. physics, chemistry and even biology with widespread applications. Although the fundamental basis of quantum theory remains intact, more recent theoretical and experimental developments have led researchers to use the laws of quantum mechanics in new and exciting ways - allowing the manipulation of matter on the atomic scale for hitherto undreamt of applications. This field not only holds the promise of addressing the issue of quantum fluctuations but of turning the quantum behaviour of nano- structures to our advantage. Indeed, the continued development of high-technology is crucial and we are convinced that our proposed CDT can play an important role. When a new field emerges a key challenge in meeting the current and future demands of industry is appropriate training, which is what we propose to achieve in this CDT. The UK plays a leading role in the theory and experimental development of CQD and Imperial College is a centre of excellence within this context. The team involved in the proposed CDT covers a wide range of key activities from theory to experiment. Collectively we have an outstanding track record in research, training of postgraduate students and teaching. The aim of the proposed CDT is to provide a coherent training environment bringing together PhD students from a wide variety of backgrounds and giving them an appreciation of experiment and theory of related fields under the umbrella of CQD. Students graduating from our programme will subsequently find themselves in high-demand both by industry and academia. The proposed CDT addresses the EPSRC strategic area Quantum Information Processing and Quantum Optics and one of the priority areas of the CDT call, Towards Quantum Technologies. The excellence of our doctoral training has been recognised by the award of a highly competitive EU Innovative Doctoral Programme (IDP) in Frontiers of Quantum Technology, which will start in October 2013 running for four years with the budget around 3.8 million euros. The new CDT will closely work with the IDP to maximise synergy. It is clear that other high-profile activities within the general area of CQD are being undertaken in a range of other UK universities and within Imperial College. A key aim of our DTC is inclusivity. We operate a model whereby academics from outside of Imperial College can act as co-supervisors for PhD students on collaborative projects whereby the student spends part of the PhD at the partner institution whilst remaining closely tied to Imperial College and the student cohort. Many of the CDT activities including lectures and summer schools will be open to other PhD students within the UK. Outreach and transferable skills courses will be emphasised to provide a set of outreach classes and to organise various outreach activities including the CDT in CQD Quantum Show to the general public and CDT Festivals and to participate in Imperials Science Festivals.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 583.88K | Year: 2015

Terrestrial biodiversity is declining globally because of human impacts, of which land-use change has so far been the most important. When people change how land is used, many of the species originally present decline or disappear from the area, while others previously absent become established. Although some species are affected immediately, others might only respond later as the consequences of the land-use change ripple through the ecosystem. Such delayed or protracted responses, which we term biotic lag, have largely been ignored in large-scale models so far. Another shortcoming of much previous work is that it has focused on numbers of species, rather than what they do. Because winners from the change are likely to be ecologically different from losers, the land-use change impacts how the assemblage functions, as well as how many species it contains. Understanding how - and how quickly - land-use change affects local assemblages is crucial for supporting better land-use decisions in the decades to come, as people try to strike the balance between short-term needs for products from ecosystems and the longer-term need for sustainability. The most obvious way to assess the global effects of land-use change on local ecological communities would be to have monitored how land use and the community have changed over a large, representative set of sites over many decades. The sites have to be representative to avoid a biased result, and the long time scale is needed because the responses can unfold over many years. Because there is no such set of sites, less direct approaches are needed. We are planning to scour the ecological literature for comparisons of communities before and after land-use change. We can correct for bias because we have estimates of how common different changes in land use have been; and we will model how responses change over time after a land-use change so that we can use longer-term and shorter-term studies alike. There are many hundreds of suitable studies, and we will ask the researchers who produced them to share their data with us; we will then make them available to everyone at the end of the project. We will combine data on species abundances before and after the land-use change with information about their ecological roles, to reveal how - and how quickly - changing land use affects the relative abundances of the various species and the ecological structure and function of the community. Does conversion of natural habitats to agriculture tend to favour smaller species over large ones, for instance, and if so how quickly? Is metabolism faster in more human-dominated land uses? These analyses will require new compilations of trait data for several ecologically important and highly diverse arthropod groups; to produce these, we will make use of the expertise, collections and library of the Natural History Museum. In an earlier NERC-funded project (PREDICTS: www.predicts.org.uk), we have already compiled over 500 data sets - provided by over 300 different researchers - that compared otherwise-matched sites where land use differed. The PREDICTS database has amassed over 2,000,000 records, from over 18,000 sites in 88 countries. The database contains more than 1% as many species as have been formally described. Our analyses of this unprecedentedly large and representative data set indicates that land-use change has had a marked global impact on average local diversity. However, because PREDICTS data sets are spatial rather than temporal comparisons, they are not well-suited to analysing the dynamics of how assemblages respond to land-use change. More fundamentally, PREDICTS assumption that spatial comparisons are an adequate substitute for temporal data now needs testing. This proposal will deliver the necessary tests, as well as producing the most comprehensive picture of how land-use change reshapes ecological assemblages through time.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.49M | Year: 2013

This project will develop new nanometre-sized catalysts and (electro-) chemical processes for producing fuels, including methanol, methane, gasoline and diesel, and chemical products from waste carbon dioxide. It builds upon a successful first phase in which a new, highly controlled nanoparticle catalyst was developed and used to produce methanol from carbon dioxide; the reaction is a pertinent example of the production of a liquid fuel and chemical feedstock. In addition, we developed high temperature electrochemical reactions and reactors for the production of synthesis gas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and oxygen from carbon dioxide and water. In this second phase of the project, we shall extend the production of fuels to include methanol, methane, gasoline and diesel, by integrating suitably complementary processes, using energy from renewable sources or off-peak electricity. The latter option is particularly attractive as a means to manage electricity loads as more renewables are integrated with the national power grid. In parallel, we will apply our new nanocatalysts to enable the copolymerization of carbon dioxide with epoxides to produce polycarbonate polyols, components of home insulation foams (polyurethanes). The approach is both commercially and environmentally attractive due to the replacement of 30-50% of the usual petrochemical carbon source (the epoxide) with carbon dioxide, and may be commercialised in the relatively near term. These copolymers are valuable products in their own right and provide a commercial-scale proving ground for the technology, before addressing integration into the larger scale challenges of fuel production and energy management. The programme will continue to improve our catalyst performance and our understanding, to enable carbon dioxide transformations to a range of valuable products. The work will be coupled with a comprehensive process systems analysis in order to develop the most practical and valuable routes to implementation. Our goal is to continue to build on our existing promising results to advance the technology towards commercialisation; the research programme will focus on: 1) Catalyst optimization and scale-up so as to maximise the activities and selectivities for target products. 2) Development and optimization of the process conditions and engineering for the nanocatalysts, including testing and modelling new reactor designs. 3) Process integration and engineering to enable tandem catalyses and efficient generation of renewable fuels, including integration with renewable energy generation taking advantage of off-peak electrical power availability. 4) Detailed economic, energetic, environmental and life cycle analysis of the processes. We will work closely with industrial partners to ensure that the technologies are practical and that key potential impediments to application are addressed. We have a team of seven companies which form our industrial advisory board, representing stakeholders from across the value chain, including: E.On, National Grid, Linde, Johnson Matthey, Simon Carves, Econic Technologies, and Shell.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.9.5 | Award Amount: 2.30M | Year: 2014

In a radical paradigm shift, manufacturers are now moving from multicore chips to so-called manycore chips with up to a million independent processors on the same silicon real estate. However, software cannot benefit from the revolutionary potential power increase, unless the design and code is polluted by an unprecedented amount of low-level, fine-grained concurrency detail.Concurrency in mainstream object-oriented languages is based on multithreading. Due to the complexity of balancing work evenly across cores, the thread model is of little benefit for efficient processor use or horizontal scalability. Problems are exacerbated in languages with shared mutable state and a stable notion of identity -- the very foundations of object-orientation. The advent of manycore chips threatens to make not only the object-oriented model obsolete, but also the accumulated know-how of a generation of programmers.Our vision is to provide the means for industry to efficiently develop applications that seamlessly scale to the available parallelism of manycore chips without abandoning the object-oriented paradigm and the associated software engineering methodologies.We will realise this vision by a breakthrough in how parallelism and concurrency are integrated into programming languages, substantiated by a complete inversion of the current canonical language design: constructs facilitating concurrent computation will be default while constructs facilitating synchronised and sequential computation will be explicitly expressed. UpScale will exploit this inversion for a novel agile development methodology based on incremental type-based program annotations specifying ever-richer deployment-related information, and for innovative type-based deployment optimisations both at compile time and at runtime in the runtime system devised in UpScale for massively parallel execution.The targeted breakthrough will profoundly impact software development for the manycore chips of the future.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMP-29-2015 | Award Amount: 8.00M | Year: 2016

A definitive conclusion about the dangers associated with human or animal exposure to a particular nanomaterial can currently be made upon complex and costly procedures including complete NM characterisation with consequent careful and well-controlled in vivo experiments. A significant progress in the ability of the robust nanotoxicity prediction can be achieved using modern approaches based on one hand on systems biology, on another hand on statistical and other computational methods of analysis. In this project, using a comprehensive self-consistent study, which includes in-vivo, in-vitro and in-silico research, we address main respiratory toxicity pathways for representative set of nanomaterials, identify the mechanistic key events of the pathways, and relate them to interactions at bionano interface via careful post-uptake nanoparticle characterisation and molecular modelling. This approach will allow us to formulate novel set of toxicological mechanism-aware end-points that can be assessed in by means of economic and straightforward tests. Using the exhaustive list of end-points and pathways for the selected nanomaterials and exposure routs, we will enable clear discrimination between different pathways and relate the toxicity pathway to the properties of the material via intelligent QSARs. If successful, this approach will allow grouping of materials based on their ability to produce the pathway-relevant key events, identification of properties of concern for new materials, and will help to reduce the need for blanket toxicity testing and animal testing in the future.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: GC.NMP.2013-1 | Award Amount: 9.01M | Year: 2013

MARS-EV aims to overcome the ageing phenomenon in Li-ion cells by focusing on the development of high-energy electrode materials (250 Wh/kg at cell level) via sustainable scaled-up synthesis and safe electrolyte systems with improved cycle life (> 3000 cycles at 100%DOD). Through industrial prototype cell assembly and testing coupled with modelling MARS-EV will improve the understanding of the ageing behaviour at the electrode and system levels. Finally, it will address a full life cycle assessment of the developed technology. MARS-EV proposal has six objectives: (i) synthesis of novel nano-structured, high voltage cathodes (Mn, Co and Ni phosphates and low-cobalt, Li-rich NMC) and high capacity anodes (Silicon alloys and interconversion oxides); (ii) development of green and safe, electrolyte chemistries, including ionic liquids, with high performance even at ambient and sub-ambient temperature, as well as electrolyte additives for safe high voltage cathode operation; (iii) investigation of the peculiar electrolyte properties and their interactions with anode and cathode materials; (iv) understanding the ageing and degradation processes with the support of modelling, in order to improve the electrode and electrolyte properties and, thus, their reciprocal interactions and their effects on battery lifetime; (v) realization of up to B5 format pre-industrial pouch cells with optimized electrode and electrolyte components and eco-designed durable packaging; and (vi) boost EU cell and battery manufacturers via the development of economic viable and technologically feasible advanced materials and processes, realization of high-energy, ageing-resistant, easily recyclable cells. MARS-EV brings together partners with complementary skills and expertise, including industry covering the complete chain from active materials suppliers to cell and battery manufacturers, thus ensuring that developments in MARS-EV will directly improve European battery production capacities.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: HCO-05-2014 | Award Amount: 3.61M | Year: 2015

South Asians, who represent one-quarter of the worlds population, are at high risk of type-2 diabetes (T2D). Intensive lifestyle modification (healthy diet and physical activity) is effective at preventing T2D amongst South Asians with impaired glucose tolerance, but this approach is limited by high-cost, poor scalability and low impact on T2D burden. We will complete a cluster-randomised clinical trial at 120 locations across India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and the UK. We will compare family-based intensive lifestyle modification (22 health promotion sessions from a community health worker, active group, N=60 sites) vs usual care (1 session, control group, N=60 sites) for prevention of T2D, amongst 3,600 non-diabetic South Asian men and women with central obesity (waist100cm) and/or prediabetes (HbA1c6.0%). Participants will be followed annually for 3 years. The primary endpoint will be new-onset T2D (physician diagnosis on treatment or HbA1c6.0%, predicted N~734 over 3 years). Secondary endpoints will include waist and weight in the index case and family members. Our study has 80% power to identify a reduction in T2D risk with family-based intervention vs usual care of: 30% in South Asians with central obesity; 24% in South Asians with prediabetes; and 24% overall. Health economic evaluation will determine cost-effectiveness of family based lifestyle modification for prevention of T2D amongst South Asians with central obesity and / or prediabetes. The impact of gender and socio-economic factors on clinical utility and cost-effectiveness will be investigated. Our results will determine whether screening by waist circumference and/or HbA1c, coupled with intervention by family-based lifestyle modification, is an efficient, effective and equitable strategy for prevention of T2D in South Asians. Our findings will thereby provide a robust evidence base for scalable community-wide approaches to reverse the epidemic of T2D amongst the >1.5 billion South Asians worldwide.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-11a-2014 | Award Amount: 6.57M | Year: 2015

The overall aim of Real-Time-Mining is to develop a real-time framework to decrease environmental impact and increase resource efficiency in the European raw material extraction industry. The key concept of the proposed research promotes the change in paradigm from discontinuous intermittent process monitoring to a continuous process and quality management system in highly selective mining operations. Real-Time Mining will develop a real-time process-feedback control loop linking online data acquired during extraction at the mining face rapidly with an sequentially up-datable resource model associated with real-time optimization of long-term planning, short-term sequencing and production control decisions. The project will include research and demonstration activities integrating automated sensor based material characterization, online machine performance measurements, underground navigation and positioning, underground mining system simulation and optimization of planning decisions, state-of-the art updating techniques for resource/reserve models. The impact of the project is expected on the environment through a reduction in CO2-emissions, increased energy efficiency and production of zero waste by maximizing process efficiency and resource utilization. Currently economically marginal deposits or difficult to access deposits will be become industrial viable. This will result in a sustainable increase in the competitiveness of the European raw material extraction through a reduced dependency on raw materials from non-EU sources.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-08-2014 | Award Amount: 25.06M | Year: 2015

The TBVAC2020 proposal builds on the highly successful and long-standing collaborations in subsequent EC-FP5-, FP6- and FP7-funded TB vaccine and biomarker projects, but also brings in a large number of new key partners from excellent laboratories from Europe, USA, Asia, Africa and Australia, many of which are global leaders in the TB field. This was initiated by launching an open call for Expressions of Interest (EoI) prior to this application and to which interested parties could respond. In total, 115 EoIs were received and ranked by the TBVI Steering Committee using proposed H2020 evaluation criteria. This led to the prioritisation of 52 R&D approaches included in this proposal. TBVAC2020 aims to innovate and diversify the current TB vaccine and biomarker pipeline while at the same time applying portfolio management using gating and priority setting criteria to select as early as possible the most promising TB vaccine candidates, and accelerate their development. TBVAC2020 proposes to achieve this by combining creative bottom-up approaches for vaccine discovery (WP1), new preclinical models addressing clinical challenges (WP2) and identification and characterisation of correlates of protection (WP5) with a directive top-down portfolio management approach aiming to select the most promising TB vaccine candidates by their comparative evaluation using objective gating and priority setting criteria (WP6) and by supporting direct, head-to head or comparative preclinical and early clinical evaluation (WP3, WP4). This approach will both innovate and diversify the existing TB vaccine and biomarker pipeline as well as accelerate development of most promising TB vaccine candidates through early development stages. The proposed approach and involvement of many internationally leading groups in the TB vaccine and biomarker area in TBVAC2020 fully aligns with the Global TB Vaccine Partnerships (GTBVP).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETPROACT-2-2014 | Award Amount: 2.89M | Year: 2015

Contemporary research endeavours aim at equipping artificial systems with human-like cognitive skills, in an attempt to promote their intelligence beyond repetitive task accomplishment. However, despite the crucial role that the sense of time has in human cognition, both in perception and action, the capacity of artificial agents to experience the flow of time remains largely unexplored. The inability of existing systems to perceive time constrains their potential understanding of the inherent temporal characteristics of the dynamic world, which in turn acts as an obstacle to their symbiosis with humans. Time perception is without doubt, not an optional extra, but a necessity for the development of truly autonomous, cognitive machines. TIMESTORM aims at bridging this fundamental gap by shifting the focus of human-machine confluence to the temporal, short- and long-term aspects of symbiotic interaction. The integrative pursuit of research and technological developments in time perception will contribute significantly to ongoing efforts in deciphering the relevant brain circuitry and will also give rise to innovative implementations of artifacts with profoundly enhanced cognitive capacities. Equipping artificial agents with temporal cognition establishes a new framework for the investigation and integration of knowing, doing, and being in artificial systems. The proposed research will study the principles of time processing in the human brain and their replication in-silico, adopting a multidisciplinary research approach that involves developmental studies, brain imaging, computational modelling and embodied experiments. By investigating artificial temporal cognition, TIMESTORM inaugurates a novel research field in cognitive systems with the potential to contribute to the advent of next generation intelligent systems, significantly promoting the seamless integration of artificial agents in human societies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.1.2-2 | Award Amount: 23.12M | Year: 2012

METACARDIS applies a systems medicine multilevel approach to identify biological relationships between gut microbiota, assessed by metagenomics, and host genome expression regulation, which will improve understanding and innovative care of cardiometabolic diseases (CMD) and their comorbidities. CMD comprise metabolic (obesity, diabetes) and heart diseases characterized by a chronic evolution in ageing populations and costly treatments. Therapies require novel integrated approaches taking into account CMD natural evolution. METACARDIS associates European leaders in metagenomics, who have been successful in establishing the structure of the human microbiome as part of the EU FP7 MetaHIT consortium, clinical and fundamental researchers, SME, patients associations and food companies to improve the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms, prognosis and diagnosis of CMD. We will use next-generation sequencing technologies and high throughput metabolomic platforms to identify gut microbiota- and metabolomic-derived biomarkers and targets associated with CMD risks. The pathophysiological role of these markers will be tested in both preclinical models and replication cohorts allowing the study of CMD progression in patients collected in three European clinical centres of excellence. Their impact on host gene transcription will be characterised in patients selected for typical features of CMD evolution. Application of computational models and visualisation tools to complex datasets combining clinical information, environmental patterns and gut microbiome, metabolome and transcriptome data is a central integrating component in the research, which will be driven by world leaders in metagenomic and functional genomic data analysis. These studies will identify novel molecular targets, biomarkers and predictors of CMD progression, paving the way for personalized medicine in CMD.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2013.3.2 | Award Amount: 972.22K | Year: 2014

The mission of this project is to make a significant contribution to raising awareness about the importance of Photonics, aiming at having impact on young minds, entrepreneurs and society as a whole. GoPhoton! aims to transmit a critical message across Europe: Photonics is ubiquitous and pervasive, it is a key enabler of the European economy and job creation, and it offers outstanding career and business opportunities. The project intends to address these challenges through a series of actions that will be developed through a collaborative network, the European Centres for Outreach in Photonics (ECOP), an alliance committed to creating durable long-term partnerships for enhanced engagement in Photonics outreach. The project aims at strongly involving the relevant European stakeholders, seeking synergies with Photonics 21, the industrial clusters and educational networks, and a possible International Year of Light in 2015. The existing tight links of the project partners with the local educational networks (teachers and science museums) will be extensively used and amplified to engage youth. Communication specialists and media will play a critical role as multipliers of the message to make Photonics a household word and to reach out the general public.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

Understanding the human brain is one of the greatest scientific challenges of our time. Such an understanding can provide profound insights into our humanity, leading to fundamentally new computing technologies, and transforming the diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. Modern ICT brings this prospect within reach. The HBP Flagship Initiative (HBP) thus proposes a unique strategy that uses ICT to integrate neuroscience data from around the world, to develop a unified multi-level understanding of the brain and diseases, and ultimately to emulate its computational capabilities. The goal is to catalyze a global collaborative effort. During the HBPs first Specific Grant Agreement (SGA1), the HBP Core Project will outline the basis for building and operating a tightly integrated Research Infrastructure, providing HBP researchers and the scientific Community with unique resources and capabilities. Partnering Projects will enable independent research groups to expand the capabilities of the HBP Platforms, in order to use them to address otherwise intractable problems in neuroscience, computing and medicine in the future. In addition, collaborations with other national, European and international initiatives will create synergies, maximizing returns on research investment. SGA1 covers the detailed steps that will be taken to move the HBP closer to achieving its ambitious Flagship Objectives.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EE-05-2016 | Award Amount: 2.90M | Year: 2016

THERMOS (Thermal Energy Resource Modelling and Optimisation System) will develop the methods, data, and tools to enable public authorities and other stakeholders to undertake more sophisticated thermal energy system planning far more rapidly and cheaply than they can today. This will amplify and accelerate the development of new low carbon heating and cooling systems across Europe, and enable faster upgrade, refurbishment and expansion of existing systems. The project will realise these benefits at the strategic planning level (quantification of technical potential, identification of new opportunities) and at the project level (optimisation of management and extension of existing and new systems). These outcomes will be achieved through: a) Development of address-level heating and cooling energy supply and demand maps, initially for the four Pilot Cities, and subsequently for the four Replication partners - establishing a standard method and schema for high resolution European energy mapping, incorporating a wide range of additional spatial data needed for modelling and planning of thermal energy systems, and their interactions with electrical and transport energy systems; b) Design and implementation of fast algorithms for modelling and optimising thermal systems, incorporating real-world cost, benefit and performance data, and operating both in wide area search, and local system optimisation contexts; c) Development of a free, open-source software application integrating the spatial datasets with the search and system optimisation algorithms (trialled and tested through the public authorities representing four Pilot Cities); d) Supporting implementation of the energy system mapping methodology, and subsequently the use of the THERMOS software, with a further four Replication Cities/Regions, from three more EU Member States; e) Comprehensive dissemination of mapping outputs and free software tools, targeting public authorities and wider stakeholders across Europe.


Europe has invoked the SET-Plan to design and implement an energy technology policy for Europe to accelerate the development and deployment of cost-effective renewable energy systems, including photovoltaics. With lower cost of solar electricity, PV could significantly contribute to the achievements of the 20-20-20 objectives. The Joint Program on PV of the European Energy Research Alliance (EERA-PV) aims to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of PV R&D through alignment and joint programming of R&D of its member institutes, and to contribute to the R&D-needs of the Solar Europe Industry Initiative. In CHEETAH, all EERA-PV members will, through collaborative R&D activities, (1) focus on solving specific bottlenecks in the R&D Joint Program of EERA-PV, (2) strengthen the collaboration between PV R&D performers in Europe through sharing of knowledge, personnel and facilities, and (3) accelerate the implementation of developed technologies in the European PV industry. Specifically, CHEETAH R&D will support Pillar A (performance enhancement & energy cost reduction) of the SEII Implementation Plan, through materials optimization and performance enhancement. CHEETAHs objectives are threefold: 1) Developing new concepts and technologies for wafer-based crystalline silicon PV (modules with ultra-thin cells), thin-film PV (advanced light management) and organic PV (very low-cost barriers), resulting in (strongly) reduced cost of materials and increased module performance; 2) Fostering long-term European cooperation in the PV R&D sector, by organizing workshops, training of researchers, efficient use of infrastructures; 3) Accelerating the implementation of innovative technologies in the PV industry, by a strong involvement of EPIA and EIT-KIC InnoEnergy in the program It is the ambition of CHEETAH to develop technology and foster manufacturing capabilities so that Europe can regain and build up own manufacturing capacity in all parts of the value chain in due time.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.2.1-4 | Award Amount: 15.74M | Year: 2013

Epilepsy is a devastating condition affecting over 50 million people worldwide. This multidisciplinary project is focused on the process leading to epilepsy, epileptogenesis, in adults. Our main hypothesis is that there are combinations of various causes, acting in parallel and/or in succession, that lead to epileptogenesis and development of seizures. Our central premise and vision is that a combinatorial approach is necessary to identify appropriate biomarkers and develop effective antiepileptogenic therapeutics. The project will focus on identifying novel biomarkers and their combinations for epileptogenesis after potentially epileptogenic brain insults in clinically relevant animal models, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI) and status epilepticus (SE); explore multiple basic mechanisms of epileptogenesis and their mutual interactions related to cell degeneration, circuit reorganization, inflammatory processes, free radical formation, altered neurogenesis, BBB dysfunction, genetic and epigenetic alterations; and translating these findings towards the clinic by validating biomarkers identified from animal models in human post TBI brain tissue and blood samples, post-mortem brain tissue in individuals that died soon after SE, and human brain and blood samples from chronic epilepsy cases. The project will identify novel combinatorial biomarkers and novel disease-modifying combinatorial treatment strategies for epileptogenesis, create an Epilepsy Preclinical Biobank, and validate translational potential of results from animal models in human tissue. To adequately address the proposed goals, the project will develop technological breakthroughs, such as completely novel chemogenetic approaches, novel MRI techniques, novel multimodal organic recording devices for simultaneous recordings of EEG / cellular unit activity and biochemical measurements, novel bioluminescence for in vivo promoter activity analysis, and novel systems biology approaches.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-24-2015 | Award Amount: 18.47M | Year: 2016

The management of febrile patients is one of the most common and important problems facing healthcare providers. Distinction between bacterial infections and trivial viral infection on clinical grounds is unreliable, and as a result innumerable patients worldwide undergo hospitalization, invasive investigation and are treated with antibiotics for presumed bacterial infection when, in fact, they are suffering from self-resolving viral infection. We aim to improve diagnosis and management of febrile patients, by application of sophisticated phenotypic, transcriptomic (genomic, proteomic) and bioinformatic approaches to well characterised large-scale, multi-national patient cohorts already recruited with EU funding. We will identify, and validate promising new discriminators of bacterial and viral infection including transcriptomic and clinical phenotypic markers. The most accurate markers distinguishing bacterial and viral infection will be evaluated in prospective cohorts of patients reflecting the different health care settings across European countries. By linking sophisticated new genomic and proteomic approaches to careful clinical phenotyping, and building on pilot data from our previous studies we will develop a comprehensive management plan for febrile patients which can be rolled out in healthcare systems across Europe.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 6.65M | Year: 2015

Society faces major challenges that require disruptive new materials solutions. For example, there is a worldwide demand for materials for sustainable energy applications, such as safer new battery technologies or the efficient capture and utilization of solar energy. This project will develop an integrated approach to designing, synthesizing and evaluating new functional materials, which will be developed across organic and inorganic solids, and also hybrids that contain both organic and inorganic modules in a single solid. The UK is well placed to boost its knowledge economy by discovering breakthrough functional materials, but there is intense global completion. Success, and long-term competitiveness, is critically dependent on developing improved capability to create such materials. All technologically advanced nations have programmes that address this challenge, exemplified by the $100 million of initial funding for the US Materials Genome Initiative. The traditional approach to building functional materials, where the properties arise from the placement of the atoms, can be contrasted with large-scale engineering. In engineering, the underpinning Newtonian physics is understood to the point that complex structures, such as bridges, can be constructed with millimetre precision. By contrast, the engineering of functional materials relies on a much less perfect understanding of the relationship between structure and function at the atomic level, and a still limited capability to achieve atomic level precision in synthesis. Hence, the failure rate in new materials synthesis is enormous compared with large-scale engineering, and this requires large numbers of researchers to drive success, placing the UK at a competitive disadvantage compared to larger countries. The current difficulty of materials design at the atomic level also leads to cultural barriers: in building a bridge, the design team would work closely with the engineering construction team throughout the process. By contrast, the direct, day-to-day integration of theory and synthesis to identify new materials is not common practice, despite impressive advances in the ability of computation to tackle more complex systems. This is a fundamental challenge in materials research. This Programme Grant will tackle the challenge by delivering the daily working-level integration of computation and experiment to discover new materials, driven by a closely interacting team of specialists in structure and property prediction, measurement and materials synthesis. Key to this will be unique methods developed by our team that led to recent landmark publications in Science and Nature. We are therefore internationally well placed to deliver this timely vision. Our approach will enable discovery of functional materials on a much faster timescale. It will have broad scope, because we will develop it across materials types with a range of targeted properties. It will have disruptive impact because it uses chemical understanding and experiment in tandem with calculations that directly exploit chemical knowledge. In the longer term, the approach will enable a wide range of academic and industrial communities in chemistry and also in physics and engineering, where there is often a keener understanding of the properties required for applications, to design better materials. This approach will lead to new materials, such as battery electrolytes, materials for information storage, and photocatalysts for solar energy conversion, that are important societal and commercial targets in their own right. We will exploit discoveries and share the approach with our commercial partners via the Knowledge Centre for Materials Chemistry and the new Materials Innovation Factory, a £68 million UK capital investment in state-of-the-art materials research facilities for both academic and industrial users. Industry and the Universities commit 55% of the project cost.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRAIA-01-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 10.00M | Year: 2017

Experimentation in mesocosms is arguably the single most powerful approach to obtain a mechanistic quantitative understanding of ecosystem-level impacts of stressors in complex systems, especially when embedded in long-term observations, theoretical models and experiments conducted at other scales. AQUACOSM builds on an established European network of mesocosm research infrastructures (RI), the FP7 Infra project MESOAQUA (2009-2012), where 167 users successfully conducted 74 projects. AQUACOSM greatly enhances that network on pelagic marine systems in at least 3 ways: first by expanding it to 10 freshwater (rivers and lakes), 2 brackish and 2 benthic marine facilities, and by involving 2 SMEs and reaching out to more, thereby granting effective transnational access to world-leading mesocosm facilities to >340 users on >11500 days; second, by integrating scattered know-how between freshwater and marine RI; and third, by uniting aquatic mesocosm science in an open network beyond the core consortium, with industry involved in an ambitious innovation process, to promote ground-breaking developments in mesocosm technology, instrumentation and data processing. A new dimension of experimental ecosystem science will be reached by coordinated mesocosm experiments along transects from the Mediterranean to the Arctic and beyond salinity boundaries. These efforts will culminate in a joint research activity (JRA) to assess aquatic ecosystem responses across multiple environmental gradients to a selected climate-related key stressor with repercussions for ecosystem services. Overall, AQUACOSM will fill a global void by forging an integrated freshwater and marine research infrastructure network. Long-term sustainability is sought through assessing governance models based on science priorities and economic innovation opportunities. Linkages to and synergies with ESFRI RI and other large initiatives are ensured by AQUACOSM partners and Advisory Board members in those programs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: FCH2-RIA | Phase: FCH-03-1-2016 | Award Amount: 2.09M | Year: 2017

Project MEMPHYS, MEMbrane based Purification of HYdrogen System, targets the development of a stand-alone hydrogen purification system based on a scalable membrane hydrogen purification module. Applications are for instance hydrogen recovery from biomass fermentation, industrial pipelines, storage in underground caverns, and industrial waste gas streams. The consortium consists of six partners including two universities, two research institutes, and two companies from five different countries. The overall budget totals 2 M, with individual budgets between 220 and 500 T. This project will utilize an electrochemical hydrogen purification (EHP) system. EHP has proven to produce high purity hydrogen (5N) while maintaining low energy consumption because the purification and optional compression are electrochemical and isothermal processes. A low CAPEX for the EHP system is feasible due to the significant reductions of system costs that result from recent design improvements and market introductions of various electrochemical conversion systems such as hydrogen fuel cells. In detail, the purification process will be a two-step process. A catalyst-coated proton exchange membrane will be assisted by one selectively permeable polymer membrane. Standard catalysts are sensitive to impurities in the gas. Therefore, alternative anode catalysts for the EHP cell, an anti-poisoning strategy and an on board diagnostic system will be developed. The resulting MEMPHYS system will be multi-deployable for purification of a large variety of hydrogen sources. A valuable feature of the MEMPHYS system is the simultaneous compression of the purified hydrogen up to 200 bar, facilitating the transport and storage of the purified hydrogen. The MEMPHYS project offers the European Union an excellent chance to advance the expertise in electrochemical conversion systems on a continental level, while at the same time promoting the use and establishment of hydrogen based renewable energy systems.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CS2-RIA | Phase: JTI-CS2-2016-CFP03-LPA-02-11 | Award Amount: 1.65M | Year: 2017

In SORCERER revolutionary lightweight electrical energy storing composite materials for future electric and hybrid-electric aircraft are to be developed. Building on previous research novel lightweight supercapacitor composites, structural battery and structural energy generating composite materials are to be realised for aeronautical application and demonstrated on the systems level. Such demonstration ranges from table-top demonstrators for structural batteries and energy harvesting materials to aircraft component demonstrators for structural supercapacitors. The SORCERER consortium consist of the world leading research groups on structural power composites. The team has an outstanding scientific track record in research covering all aspects of structural power composites development and manufacture namely: multifunctional matrices (SPE) and carbon fibres (i.e. constituents); separator materials and designs; structural electrodes; connectivity and power management and materials modelling and design. In SORCERER we will build on these experiences to adapt current structural power composites solutions for aeronautical applications as well as develop new materials and devices for the aircraft application. By the end of the project each technology, i.e. structural supercapacitor, battery and power generation device, will have matured and as a result been brought-up at least one step on the TRL scale. In particular, the developed devices will be demonstrated on the systems level. For all structural battery and power generation composite materials this will be the worlds first demonstration on that level of complexity.


Patent
Imperial Innovations Ltd and Imperial College London | Date: 2016-08-10

A method for estimating a channel in a wireless communication system in which a plurality of terminals and a base station communicate with each other, according to one embodiment of the present invention, comprises the steps of: receiving reference signals transmitted through a plurality of slots; and estimating a channel by using the reference signals. Here, for the channel estimation, the number of reference signals received through at least one slot among the plurality of slots is different from the number of reference signals received through the other slots.


Eda G.,National University of Singapore | Maier S.A.,Imperial College London
ACS Nano | Year: 2013

Semiconducting two-dimensional (2D) crystals such as MoS2 and WSe2 exhibit unusual optical properties that can be exploited for novel optoelectronics ranging from flexible photovoltaic cells to harmonic generation and electro-optical modulation devices. Rapid progress of the field, particularly in the growth area, is beginning to enable ways to implement 2D crystals into devices with tailored functionalities. For practical device performance, a key challenge is to maximize light-matter interactions in the material, which is inherently weak due to its atomically thin nature. Light management around the 2D layers with the use of plasmonic nanostructures can provide a compelling solution. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2011.2.2.1-2 | Award Amount: 24.91M | Year: 2012

The goal of this proposal (INMiND) is to carry out collaborative research on molecular mechanisms that link neuroinflammation with neurodegeneration in order to identify novel biological targets for activated microglia, which may serve for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, and to translate this knowledge into the clinic. The general objectives of INMiND are: (i) to identify novel mechanisms of regulation and function of microglia under various conditions (inflammatory stimuli; neurodegenerative and -regenerative model systems); (ii) to identify and implement new targets for activated microglia, which may serve for diagnostic (imaging) and therapeutic purposes; (iii) to design new molecular probes (tracers) for these novel targets and to implement and validate them in in vivo model systems and patients; (iv) to image and quantify modulated microglia activity in patients undergoing immune therapy for cognitive impairment and relate findings to clinical outcome. Within INMiND we bring together a group of excellent scientists with a proven background in efficiently accomplishing common scientific goals (FP6 project DiMI, www.dimi.eu), who belong to highly complementary fields of research (from genome-oriented to imaging scientists and clinicians), and who are dedicated to formulate novel image-guided therapeutic strategies for neuroinflammation related neurodegenerative diseases. The strength of this proposal is that, across Europe, it will coordinate research and training activities related to neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration/-regeneration and imaging with special emphasis on translating basic mechanisms into clinical applications that will provide health benefits for our aging population. With its intellectual excellence and its crucial mass the INMiND consortium will play a major role in the European Research Area and will gain European leadership in the creation of new image-guided therapy paradigms in patients with neurodegenerative diseases.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2013.1.1-2 | Award Amount: 3.26M | Year: 2013

The SPINTAN project aims at discovering the theoretical and empirical underpins of public intangible policies. It widens previous work carried out by Corrado, Hulten and Sichel (2005, 2009) including the public sector in their analytical framework in different complementary directions that can be summarized in the following three objectives: (1) to build a public intangible database for a wide set of EU countries, complemented with some big non-EU countries; (2) to analyze the impact of public sector intangibles on innovation, well-being and smart growth (including education, R&D and innovation, and the construction of a digital society); and (3) to pay special attention to the medium/long term consequences of austerity policies in view of the expected recovery. In order to achieve these goals the overall strategy of the project will rely upon the following pillars organized around six work packages. WP 1 concentrates on the methodological discussion on the concept of intangibles in the public sector and the definition of its boundaries. WP 2 will be devoted to the construction of a database for a large set of EU countries and the US, plus three developing countries (China, India, and possibly Brazil), complementary to the one already developed by the INTAN-Invest project. WP 3 will make a detailed analysis of the implications for smart growth and social inclusion of three key aspects of public sector policies: health, education and R&D with special reference to higher education institutions; WP 4 will investigate the effect of spillovers of public sector intangibles on the business sector, within a country or across countries. WP 5 will address the study of the present and future consequences of the austerity measures taken since 2008. And, finally, WP 6 will bring together the different pieces offering a synthesis of the main results emphasizing the main policy implications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2012.1.4-2 | Award Amount: 4.86M | Year: 2013

The Self-Assembled Virus-like Vectors for Stem Cell Phenotyping (SAVVY) project relies on hierarchical, multi-scale assembly of intrinsically dissimilar nanoparticles to develop novel types of multifunctional Raman probes for analysis and phenotyping of heterogeneous stem cell populations. Our project will address a large unmet need, as stem cells have great potential for a broad range of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. Characterization and sorting of heterogeneous stem cell populations has been intrinsically hampered by (1) lack of specific antibodies, (2) need for fluorescence markers, (3) low concentration of stem cells, (4) low efficiencies/high costs. Our technology will use a fundamentally different approach that (1) does not require antibodies, aptamers, or biomarkers, (2) is fluorescence-label free, and (3) is scalable at acceptable cost. The approach uses intrinsic differences in the composition of membranes of cells to distinguish cell populations. These differences will be detect by SERS and analysed through multicomponent analysis. We have combined the necessary expertise to tackle this challenge: Stellacci has developed rippled nanoparticles that specifically interact with and adhere to cell membranes (analogues to cell penetrating peptides). Lahann has developed bicompartmental Janus polymer particles that have already been surface-modified with rippled particles and integrate specifically in the cell membrane (analogues to viruses). Liz-Marzan has developed highly Raman-active nanoparticles and has demonstrated their selectivity and specificity in SERS experiments. These Raman probes will be loaded into the synthetic viruses to enable membrane fingerprinting. Stevens has developed a Bioinformatics platform for fingerprinting of stem cell populations using cluster analysis algorithms. The effort will be joined by two SMEs, ChipShop and OMT, that will be able to develop the necessary microfluidic and Raman detection hardware.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2013.4.0-2 | Award Amount: 5.13M | Year: 2013

The ArtESun project combines the multidisciplinary and complementary competences of top-level European research groups and industries in order to make significant steps towards high-efficiency >15%, stable and cost efficient OPV technology. For this purpose, the project objectives are set to make break-through advances in the state of the art in terms of (i) the development of innovative high efficient OPV materials which can be used to demonstrate the cost-effective non-vacuum production of large area arbitrary size and shape OPV modules (ii) understanding of the long term stable operation and the degradation mechanisms at the material and OPV device level (iii) the development of roll-to-roll (R2R) additive non-vacuum coating and printing techniques emphasizing efficient materials usage and cost efficient R2R processing and (iv) demonstration of high performance arbitrary size and shape OPV systems in environments relevant to its expected future applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2011.7.2-1 | Award Amount: 19.44M | Year: 2012

6 Transmission System Operators (Belgium, France, Greece, Norway, Portugal and United Kingdom) and CORESO, a TSO coordination centre, together with 13 RTD performers propose a 4 year R&D project to develop and to validate an open interoperable toolbox which will bring support, by 2015, to future operations of the pan-European electricity transmission network, thus favouring increased coordination/harmonisation of operating procedures among network operators. Under the coordination of RTE, new concepts, methods and tools are developed to define security limits of the pan European system and to quantify the distance between an operating point and its nearest security boundary: this requires building its most likely description and developing a risk based security assessment accounting for its dynamic behaviour. The chain of resulting tools meets 3 overarching functional goals: i) to provide a risk based security assessment accounting for uncertainties around the most likely state, for probabilities of contingencies and for corresponding preventive and corrective actions. ii) to construct more realistic states of any system (taking into account its dynamics) over different time frames (real-time, intraday, day ahead, etc.). iii) to assess system security using time domain simulations (with less approximation than when implementing current standard methods/tools). The prototype tool box is validated according to use cases of increasing complexity: static risk-based security approach at control zone level, dynamic security margins accounting for new power technologies (HVDC, PST, FACTS), use of data coming from off-line security screening rules into on-line security assessment, and finally security maps at pan European level. Dissemination is based on periodic workshops for a permanent user group of network operators invited to use modules to meet their own control zone needs and the ones of present or future coordination centres.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2012.6.4-3 | Award Amount: 11.65M | Year: 2012

This project aims to predict individual disease risk related to the environment, by characterizing the external and internal exposome for common exposures (air and drinking water contaminants) during critical periods of life, including in utero. A large amount of health data is now available from longitudinal cohorts in both children and adults, with detailed information on risk factors, confounders and outcomes, but these are not well linked with environmental exposure data. The exposome concept refers to the totality of environmental exposures from conception onwards, and is a novel approach to studying the role of the environment in human disease. This project will move the field forward by utilising data on individual external exposome (including sensors, smartphones, geo-referencing, satellites), and omic profiles in an agnostic search for new and integrated biomarkers. These tools will be applied in both experimental short-term studies and long-term longitudinal studies in humans. The ultimate goal is to use the new tools in risk assessment and in the estimation of the burden of environmental disease. The involvement of two SMEs, one specialized in sensors and smartphone development, the other in complex data integration, will increase the chances of a successful impact on European Public Health. This multidisciplinary proposal combines: development of a general framework for the systematic measurement of the internal and external exposome in Europe in relation to air and water contamination, as a way to reduce uncertainty in risk assessment and to address the effects of mixtures and complex exposures; evaluation of health outcomes and key physiological changes in short-term studies (including a randomized trial) and life-course studies with a large amount of information on diet, physical activity and anthropometry; evaluation of the burden of disease in the European population, based on state-of-the-art assessment of population exposures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.1.3-1 | Award Amount: 15.99M | Year: 2013

HeCaToS aims at developing integrative in silico tools for predicting human liver and heart toxicity. The objective is to develop an integrated modeling framework, by combining advances in computational chemistry and systems toxicology, for modelling toxic perturbations in liver and heart across multiple scales. This framework will include vertical integrations of representations from drug(metabolite)-target interactions, through macromolecules/proteins, to (sub-)cellular functionalities and organ physiologies, and even the human whole-body level. In view of the importance of mitochondrial deregulations and of immunological dysfunctions associated with hepatic and cardiac drug-induced injuries, focus will be on these particular Adverse Outcome Pathways. Models will be populated with data from innovative in vitro 3D liver and heart assays challenged with prototypical hepato- or cardiotoxicants; data will be generated by advanced molecular and functional analytical techniques retrieving information on key (sub-)cellular toxic evens. For validating perturbed AOPs in vitro in appropriate human investigations, case studies on patients with liver injuries or cardiomyopathies due to adverse drug effects, will be developed, and biopsies will be subjected to similar analyses. Existing ChEMBL and diXa data infrastructures will be advanced for data gathering, storing and integrated statistical analysis. Model performance in toxicity prediction will be assessed by comparing in silico predictions with experimental results across a multitude of read-out parameters, which in turn will suggest additional experiments for further validating predictions. HeCaToS, organized as a private-public partnership, will generate major socioeconomic impact because it will develop better chemical safety tests leading to safer drugs, but also industrial chemicals, and cosmetics, thereby improving patient and consumer health, and sustaining EUs industrial competitiveness.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 4.11M | Year: 2013

The DREAMS Initial Training Network will investigate the problem of modeling, controlling, removing, and synthesizing acoustic reverberation with the aim of enhancing the quality and intelligibility of audio, music, and speech signals. The proposed research and training program builds upon four disciplines that are equally important in understanding and tackling the (de-)reverberation problem: room acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, and speech and audio processing. The strong commitment of the private sector in the proposed ITN consortium, consisting of 4 academic and 8 industrial partners, illustrates the timeliness and importance of the (de-)reverberation problem in a wide variety of applications. However, carrying application-driven solutions is not the only objective of the DREAMS research program. Indeed, the aim is also to take a significant step forward and make fundamental scientific contributions in each of the four disciplines mentioned earlier. To this end, the envisaged ITN will host 12 early stage researchers and 4 experienced researchers, each performing an individual research project around one of four themes that reflect the most challenging open problems in the area of (de-)reverberation. The DREAMS ITN will be implemented such as to maximize the international and intersectoral experience of the research fellows, by defining relevant secondments in academia and industry, both in the host country and abroad. Moreover, experienced researchers will be expected to take on a supervisory role in coordinating one of the four research themes, with the aim of developing solid skills in leadership and research management. Finally, a training program of extremely high quality is proposed, with local as well as network-wide training, which relies on the scientific excellence of the involved partners and of invited external researchers, and which heavily depends on the input of the private sector.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2012.8.8.2 | Award Amount: 26.01M | Year: 2013

The CELSIUS City Consortium is going to deploy 12 new technically and economically innovative demonstrators. Another up to 20 state-of-art demonstrators (already in operation) will proof the CELSIUS City Concept covering the full FP7 8.8.2 requirements. CELSIUS has a clear strategy and a pro-active approach to Market Outreach, which will strive to commit 50 new cities to the CELSIUS Roadmap by the end of 2016. When fully implemented, this will lead to 20-45 TWh reduction in the use of primary energy p.a. CELSIUS City is well positioned to deliver those targets due a strong partnership of major front running European cities and their respective utilities, and further outstanding innovative organizations, with track records both in creating technically and economically innovative demonstrators, as well as in understanding and overcoming the barriers for large scale deployment (e.g. Imperial College (UK), SP (S), TU Delft (NL), Cologne University of Applied Sciences (D), DAppalonia (IT), LSE (UK)). CELSIUS has eight work packages targeting on the successful deployment of the 13 new demonstrators (WP3), supported by a collaborative approach to harvest beyond state-of-the-art insights from Tech & Innovation (WP5) and Stakeholder Acceptance (WP6). The local demonstrator perspective is enriched by the Integration & Roadmap (WP2). The final goal for Communication & Market Outreach (WP8) is based on developing the CELSIUS in the Market Uptake (WP7). A powerful project management office (WP1), seconded by rigor monitoring (WP4), coordinates all work packages and assuring over the time of the CELSIUS Consortium, both impactful deployment and sustainable market outreach. The total cost of the CELSIUS 13 new demonstrators is 69m EUR, of which the cities themselves will provide 55m EUR. The requested EU funding enables these activities laying the foundation for the successful large scale deployment of the CELSIUS City Concept across Europe and beyond 2020.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.3-1 | Award Amount: 4.50M | Year: 2014

An estimated one billion tyres are discarded each year. Post-Consumer tyre arisings for EU countries (2010) are 3.4M tonnes per year. At the moment nearly 50% of all recycled tyres/components still end up as fuel, in low grade applications or in landfill. All tyre constituents (rubber, high strength steel cord and wire, high strength textile reinforcement) are high quality materials and deserve to be reused for their relevant properties. Construction is the highest user of materials with concrete being the most popular structural material. Concrete is inherently brittle in compression (unless suitably confined) and weak in tension and, hence, it is normally reinforced with steel bars or fibres. The authors believe that highly confined rubberised concrete can lead to highly deformable concrete elements and structures and that tyre steel and textile fibres can be used as concrete reinforcement to control shrinkage cracking. Hence, the aim of this proposal is to develop innovative solutions to reuse all tyre components in high value innovative concrete applications with reduced environmental impact. To achieve this aim, the proposed project will have to overcome scientific and technological challenges in: Development of novel confined rubberised concrete materials and reinforcement Development of high deformability RC elements suitable for integral bridge elements and base isolation systems for vibrations and seismic applications Development of concrete mixes using recycled steel fibres for use in various applications such as slabs on grade, suspended slabs, precast concrete elements and pumpable self compacting concrete or screed Development of concrete mixes using recycled tyre polymer fibres for crack control Development of novel concrete applications using combinations of the different tyre by-products Undertaking demonstrations projects using the developed materials/applications Development and implementation of standardised LCA/LCCA protocols


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EINFRA-1-2014 | Award Amount: 8.02M | Year: 2015

In the coming decade a significant number of the 500.000.000 European (EU/EEA) citizens will have their genome determined routinely. This will be complemented with much cheaper (currently ~20 Euro per measurement) acquisition of the metabolome of biofluids (e.g. urine, saliva, blood plasma) which will link the genotype with metabolome data that captures the highly dynamic phenome and exposome of patients. Having such low cost solutions will enable, for the first time, the development of a truly personalised and evidence-based medicine founded on hard scientific measurements. The exposome includes the metabolic information resulting from all the external influences on the human organism such as age, behavioural factors like exercise and nutrition or other environmental factors. Considering that the amount of data generated by molecular phenotyping exceeds the data volume of personal genomes by at least an order of magnitude, the collection of such information will pose dramatic demands on biomedical data management and compute capabilities in Europe. For example, a single typical National Phenome Centre, managing only around 100,000 human samples per year, can generate more than 2 Petabytes of data during this period alone. A scale-up to sizable portions of the European population over time will require data analysis services capable to work on exabyte-scale amounts of biomedical phenotyping data, for which no viable solution exists at the moment. The PhenoMeNal project will develop and deploy an integrated, secure, permanent, on-demand service-driven, privacy-compliant and sustainable e-infrastructure for the processing, analysis and information-mining of the massive amount of medical molecular phenotyping and genotyping data that will be generated by metabolomics applications now entering research and clinic.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-CAR | Phase: MSCA-IF-2014-EF | Award Amount: 195.45K | Year: 2015

In line with the EU 2020 Flagship Initiative on a Digital Agenda for Europe and the upcoming EU Cybersecurity Strategy, the goal of the LV-Pri20 project is to aid our ICT-driven lives, by safeguarding the human right of privacy in the digital society. Concretely, the main focus of LV-Pri20 is the formal and automatic analysis of privacy-preservation in todays ICT. LV-Pri20 will focus on the prevalent wireless media, e.g., RF-identification protocols, remote car-unlocking, wearables, machine-to-machine communication in the Internet of Things (IoT)/ubiquitous computing, but it will not neglect wired environments (given their common cloud-connection). LV-Pri20 will assess and automatically analyse privacy-sensitive applications, in their standalone execution, as well as in the more involved setting of multiple, concurrent executions thereof. This will be done systematically and taxonomically: distinct classes of applications (e.g., identification protocols using Electronic Product Codes vs. the Open Smart Grid Protocol) and different privacy properties (e.g., data non-leakage vs. data-user unlinkability) will be respectively analysed via tailored, well-defined techniques. To specify privacy, LV-Pri20 will design/refine different non-classical logic languages which have inherent semantics for privacy-like expression (e.g., strategy logics). For these, we will then develop new model checking algorithms. All will be incorporated in automatic verification software, which already proved efficient in analysing highly distributed systems, inline with, e.g., the IoT applications envisaged herein. LV-Pri20 will have a multi-disciplinary, collaborative nature, an academic core and industrial side. After an initial privacy scrutiny, new/patched RFID-based, privacy-preserving, communication protocols will be (re-)designed and implemented. For these, we will devise mathematical proofs for one-session security, and run automatic analysis of their multi-session executions.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 169.32K | Year: 2015

Advances in fit for use manufacturing of biopharmaceutical drug delivery and pharmaceutical systems are now required to fit Quality by Design (QbD) models. These current regulations require excellence to be built into the preparation of emerging products (both material and process) thereby leading to product robustness and quality. In addition, industrial needs (economical and reproducible quality enhancement) are driving manufacturing towards continuous processes over batch type processes which also rely on QbD (for integrity and quality). EHDA technology is a robust process that has been utilised in various formats (e.g. electrospinning, electrospraying, bubbling and even 3D printing) and is favourable due to applicability with the development of stable nanomedicines and biopharmaceuticals, the emergence of this technology is clearly evident in the UK and on the global scale. Attempts in scaling up (for suitable pharmaceutical scale) and in tandem with continuous processes (including controlled manufacturing) have been very limited. There also, now, remains a huge void in the adaptation of sensible QbD (multi-variate) for the current methods developed and also those required by industry. While lab scale research continues with the ongoing development of such processes (e.g. nanomedicines, smart and controlled delivery), the transition to industry or the clinic will have to meet these regulations (and scales) for there to be a real impact, which is now, also, an important aspect of grass root research in the UK. The EHDA network brings together specialists from academia and industry to advance this technology through several means. Firstly, initiating developments towards a real-viable scale for Pharmaceutical production. Secondly, to incorporate developments in lean manufacturing and legislation (e.g. continuous manufacturing, online diagnostics, QbD and adaptable scale). Thirdly, to marry optimised lean technologies with novel and emerging macromolecular therapies and actives. The network has a wide range of activities and initiatives which will lead to significant developments (and collaborations) in an area of increasing global interest (EHDA processes) - but currently only on a viable lab scale to date. This network will be the first of its kind and will serve as the central and pioneering hub in this remit.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.89M | Year: 2016

Nanomedicine (NM) is regarded as one of the most promising applications of nanotechnology, as it would allow the development of tailored therapies, with a high level of selectivity and efficacy. Although much research has been performed over the past decades, translation from academia to commercial application remains disappointingly low. Reasons that explain the current moderate success of NM are: (1) promising preclinical results are often poorly predictive for clinical safety and effectiveness, (2) the efficient, scalable and reproducible GMP production of nanocarriers has proven to be challenging and (3) regulatory frameworks are not yet fully equipped to efficiently facilitate the introduction of novel nanomedicines. These obstacles are often encountered since the developmental process from carrier design to clinical assessment is performed by a range of scientists from different backgrounds who have difficulty interacting and communicating with each other to clearly understand the necessary design criteria and the scope and limitations of NM. NANOMED brings together all the necessary expertise to oversee the entire development trajectory required for NM. This is achieved by the combined effort of 7 beneficiaries from academia and industry and 5 non-academic partner organisations, which are all thoroughly rooted in nanosciences and pharmaceutical sciences. Our objective is to develop scalable and highly controllable design and synthesis methods for the most promising nanomedicine types in a preclinical setting. NANOMED will train the next generation of NM scientists by offering an extensive joint training programme to 15 incoming ESRs. It focuses on promoting scientific excellence and exploits the specific research and commercial expertise and infrastructure of the NANOMED network as a whole. The exposure to all elements of NM design enables NANOMED to translate expertise from all disciplines to the ESRs, to educate the future leading scientists in the NM field.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 877.50K | Year: 2017

Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies and overall numerical fabrication methods have been recognized by stakeholders as the next industrial revolution bringing customers needs and suppliers offers closer. It cannot be dissociated to the present trends in increased virtualization, cloud approaches and collaborative developments (i.e. sharing of resources). AM is likely to be one good option paving the way to Europe re-industrialization and increased competitiveness. AMITIE will reinforce European capacities in the AM field applied to ceramic-based products. Through its extensive programme of transnational and intersectoral secondments, AMITIE will promote fast technology transfer and enable as well training of AM experts from upstream research down to more technical issues. This will provide Europe with specialists of generic skills having a great potential of knowledge-based careers considering present growing needs for AM industry development. To do that, AMITIE brings together leading academic and industrial European players in the fields of materials science/processes, materials characterizations, AM technologies and associated numerical simulations, applied to the fabrication of functional and/or structural ceramic-based materials for energy/transport, and ICTs applications, as well as biomaterials. Those players will develop a new concept of smart factory for the future based on 3D AM technologies (i.e. powder bed methods, robocasting, inkjet printing, stereolithography, etc.) and their possible hybridization together or with subtractive technologies (e.g. laser machining). It will allow for the production of parts whose dimensions, shapes, functionality and assembly strategies may be tailored to address todays key technological issues of the fabrication of high added value objects following a fully-combinatorial route. This is expected to lead to a new paradigm for production of multiscale, multimaterial and multifunctional components and systems


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 4.20M | Year: 2013

RENESENG aims to prepare a new generation of highly-qualified researchers in Biorefinery and biobased chemicals Systems Engineering Sciences in Europe, expected to bear high impact in the design of newly establishing industrial complexes in biorefinering and more generally in eco-industries. The effort requires to bring together academic and industrial teams, with particularly interdisciplinary and high-quality expertise, embracing disciplines in agricultural sciences, chemistry and chemical eng., biology and biotechnology, computer science, process engineering, logistics and business economics, as well as social sciences with an emphasis on life cycle analysis skills. The principal scientific challenge of the network is to develop a program of inter-disciplinary research from expert groups with dedicated interests in biorenewables using a model-assisted systems approach as an integrating aspect, further capitalizing on its potential and role to address complex and large problems. The proposal brings state-of-the-art systems technologies mobilizing a critical mass in Europe that is already particularly active in this area but needs to coordinate the efforts and reduce fragmentation of knowledge. The aim is to develop and validate modelling, synthesis, integration and optimization technology addressing: 1)lignin-based and cellulosic processes2)water based paths to biomass production 3) waste treatment paths 4) combination of biorenewables processing with utilization of other renewable. In parallel RENESENG has developed a program of training activities including, development of communication, business, and social skills, visits and social events allowing to prepare a new profile of researchers able to transmit their knowledge in the next networking teams. RENESENG guaranties high quality careers perspective for all, through the active participation of 6 industrials, the creation of spin-offs and the sustainable implementation of a multicenter PhD training program.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.85M | Year: 2013

ECCO-MATE aims to create a research and training platform for the development and implementation of novel fuel mixture preparation, injection profiling, air management and staged/low temperature combustion technologies both in marine and light-duty automotive diesel engines. The marine (slow speed, large-sized, two-stroke engines) and land-transport (high speed, small-to-medium-sized, four-stroke engines) sectors share essentially the same strategic challenges, namely the implementation of energy efficient and fuel flexible combustion technologies, in order to improve efficiency and meet stringent emission standards. However, there is little established training and academic communication between the two sectors, despite the common problems relating to the fuel injection, ignition and combustion methodologies and potentialities of new more environmentally friendly fuels. ECCO-MATE bridges this gap by creating a platform for research output exchange between the two sectors on diesel engine combustion by coupling state-of-the-art flow physics and combustion chemistry with CFD tools and advanced optical diagnostics. The consortium comprises 16 key partners - 6 Universities, 5 major key-stakeholders from the marine and automotive engine industries and 5 associate partners - from 7 EU countries and Japan. The consortium processes multi-disciplinary expertise, strong interests and tradition in both sectors and the necessary critical mass to achieve the research and ensuing training activities that highlight synergies, complementarities and provide solutions to the addressed common problems of the two sectors. The comprehensive training program (academic and professional training, focussed dissemination activities, trans-national and trans-sectoral mobility) exploits the multi-disciplinarity of the consortium creating high level skills for the participating researchers and ensuring continuation of the research activities after the project completion.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-29-2016 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2016

Colorectal cancer represents around one tenth of all cancers worldwide. Early and accurate diagnosis and precise intervention can increase cure rate up to 90%. Improved diagnostic techniques with enough sensitivity and specificity are required to allow in situ assessment, safe characterization and resection of lesions during clinical practice interventions. The multidisciplinary PICCOLO team proposes a new compact, hybrid and multimodal photonics endoscope based on Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Multi-Photon Tomography (MPT) combined with novel red-flag fluorescence technology for in vivo diagnosis and clinical decision support. By combining the outstanding structural information from OCT with the precise functional information from MPT, this innovative endoscope will provide gastroenterologists immediate and detailed in situ identification of colorectal neoplastic lesions and facilitate accurate and reliable in vivo diagnostics, with additional, grading capabilities for colon cancer as well as in-situ lesion infiltration and margin assessment. With the development of compact instrumentation, the cost of the components and thus the system will be significantly reduced. Human representative animal models will be used to generate imaging biomarkers that allow automated detection, assessment and grading of disease. The developed system will be tested in operating room conditions. The consortium comprises the whole value chain including pre-clinical and clinical partners, technology providers, photonics SMEs and endoscopy market leader company. The project will permit these companies to enhance their competitiveness and leadership in the diagnostics sector as well as exploiting new market opportunities. The new endoscope will significantly impact clinical practice allowing in vivo optical biopsy assessment via the automatic analysis of images allowing accurate and efficient characterisation of colorectal lesions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-06-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 5.88M | Year: 2016

EUCalc replies to topic a) Managing technology transition. The EUCalc project will deliver a much needed comprehensive framework for research, business, and decision making which enables an appraisal of synergies and trade-offs of feasible decarbonisation pathways on the national scale of Europe and its member countries \ Switzerland. The novel and pragmatic modelling approach is rooted between pure complex energy system and emissions models and integrated impact assessment tools, introduces an intermediate level of complexity and a multi-sector approach and is developed in a co-design process with scientific and societal actors. EUCalc explores decisions made in different sectors, like power generation, transport, industry, agriculture, energy usage and lifestyles in terms of climatological, societal, and economic consequences. For politicians at European and member state level, stakeholders and innovators EUCalc will therefore provide a Transition Pathways Explorer, which can be used as a much more concrete planning tool for the needed technological and societal challenges, associated inertia and lock-in effects. EUCalc will enable to address EU sustainability challenges in a pragmatic way without compromising on scientific rigour. It is meant to become a widely used democratic tool for policy and decision making. It will close - based on sound model components - a gap between actual climate-energy-system models and an increasing demands of decision makers for information at short notice. This will be supported by involving an extended number of decision-makers from policy and business as well as other stakeholders through expert consultations and the co-design of a Transition Pathways Explorer, a My Europe 2050 education tool and a Massive Open Online Course.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA | Phase: Fission-2013-2.1.1 | Award Amount: 10.28M | Year: 2013

Preparing NUGENIA for HORIZON 2020 The objective of the NUGENIA\ project is to support the NUGENIA Association in its role to coordinate and integrate European research on safety of the Gen II and III nuclear installations in order to better ensure their safe long term operation, integrating private and public efforts, and initiating international collaboration that will create added value in its activity fields. The project consists of two parts, the first part being a Coordination and Support Action and the second part a Collaborative Project. The aim of the first part, the Coordination and Support Action, is to establish an efficient, transparent and high quality management structure to carry out the planning and management of R&D including project calls, proposal evaluation, project follow-up dissemination and valorisation of R&D results in the area of safety of existing Gen II and future Gen III nuclear installations. The preparatory work will encompass governance, organizational, legal and financial work, as well as the establishment of annual work plans, with the aim to structure public-public and/or private-public joint programming enabling NUGENIA to develop into the integrator of the research in the respective field in Europe. The management structure will build on the existing organisation of the NUGENIA Association, currently grouping over 70 nuclear organisations from research and industry (utilities, vendors and small and medium enterprises) active in R&D. In the second part, the Collaborative project, one thematic call for research proposals will be organized among the technical areas of plant safety and risk assessment, severe accident prevention and management, core and reactor performance, integrity assessment of systems, structures and components, innovative Generation III design and harmonisation of procedures and methods. The call will take place one year after the start of the project. The call will implement the priorities recognised in the NUGENIA Roadmap, in line with the Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNETP) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) strategies. The research call which is going to be organised within the project is open to all eligible organisations. The NUGENIA\ project will benefit from the experience of the NUGENIA Association member organisations on managing national research programmes and from the track record of the NUGENIA project portfolio.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMBP-10-2016 | Award Amount: 6.09M | Year: 2017

The incidence of Cardiovascular Disease (CD) claims worldwide 17.1 million lives a year, with an estimated 31% of all deaths globally and a EU cost of 139 billion euros. Up to 40% of all deaths occur among the elderly. In spite of all medical efforts, the 5-year mortality was reduced significantly less than that of malignant diseases. This highlights the urgent need to overcome the difficulties associated with present pharmacological therapies (i.e. drug instability, and unspecific targeting) by developing new ground-breaking therapeutic strategies that go far beyond any current regimens. New approaches for safe, efficient, and heart-specific delivery of therapeutics are strongly required. CUPIDO is envisioned to meet these critical needs by providing an unconventional and effective strategy based on nanoparticle-assisted delivery of clinically available and novel therapeutics to the diseased heart. In particular, CUPIDO will develop innovative bioinspired hybrid nanoparticles formulated as biologicals delivery, which are i) biocompatible and biodegradable, ii) designed for crossing biological barriers, and iii) guidable to the heart. A combination of multidisciplinary manufacturing and validation approaches will be employed, bringing the envisioned product beyond the currently available clinical and day-to-day management of CD individuals. Scale-up production, and respect of medical regulatory requirements will allow CUPIDO to deliver a final product for future late pre-clinical and clinical studies. Altogether, CUPIDO will foster the translation of nanomedical applications toward the cardiac field, which although still in its start, offers great potential to overcome the limitations associated to the currently pharmacological treatments.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-24-2016 | Award Amount: 3.21M | Year: 2016

ROLINCAP will search, identify and test novel phase-change solvents, including aqueous and non-aqueous options, as well as phase-change packed bed and Rotating Packed Bed processes for post-combustion CO2 capture. These are high-potential technologies, still in their infancy, with initial evidence pointing to regeneration energy requirements below 2.0 GJ/ton CO2 and considerable reduction of the equipment size, several times compared to conventional processes . These goals will be approached through a holistic decision making framework consisting of methods for modeling and design that have the potential for real breakthroughs in CO2 capture research. The tools proposed in ROLINCAP will cover a vast space of solvent and process options going far beyond the capabilities of existing simulators. ROLINCAP follows a radically new path by proposing one predictive modelling framework, in the form of the SAFT- equation of state, for both physical and chemical equilibrium, for a wide range of phase behaviours and of molecular structures. The envisaged thermodynamic model will be used in optimization-based Computer-aided Molecular Design of phase-change solvents in order to identify options beyond the very few previously identified phase-change solvents. Advanced process design approaches will be used for the development of highly intensified Rotating Packed Bed processes. Phase-change solvents will be considered with respect to their economic and operability RPB process characteristics. The sustainability of both the new solvents and the packed-bed and RPB processes will be investigated considering holistic Life Cycle Assessment analysis and Safety Health and Environmental Hazard assessment. Selected phase-change solvents, new RPB column concepts and packing materials will be tested at TRL 4 and 5 pilot plants. Software in the form of a new SAFT- equation of state will be tested at TRL 5 in the gPROMS process simulator.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.3.2-2 | Award Amount: 7.80M | Year: 2013

Persons with HIV on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) are at increased risk of the premature development of age-associated non-communicable comorbidities (AANCC), including cardiovascular, chronic kidney, liver and pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, non-AIDS associated malignancies, and neurocognitive impairment. It has therefore been hypothesised that such individuals, despite effective cART, may be prone to accelerated ageing. The underlying pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and include sustained immune activation, both systemically and within the central nervous system. By building on an established infrastructure for conducting longitudinal HIV cohort studies in Amsterdam and London, we will provide a detailed, prospective evaluation of AANCC among HIV-infected patients suppressed on cART and appropriately chosen and comparable non-infected controls. In this way, we will provide a robust estimate of the effect of treated HIV infection on the prevalence, incidence and age of onset of AANCC, thus clearly establishing a link between HIV and AANCC. Through the Human Immune System (HIS) mouse model, experimental studies will permit us to differentiate the effects of HIV and cART on metabolic outcomes when applied under controlled conditions, thereby further elucidating the causative nature of the link between HIV and AANCC. To further clarify potential pathogenic mechanisms underlying this causative link, including the possible induction of an inflammation-associated accelerated ageing phenotype, biomarkers which reflect each of these mechanisms will be investigated in biomaterial obtained from HIS mice and humans, and subsequently validated in patients with HIV on cART. The successful execution of the experimental and clinical research outlined in this proposal will be ensured through a strong interdisciplinary collaboration between clinical, basic and translational scientists bridging the fields of HIV, AANCC and ageing.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.1.5 | Award Amount: 4.67M | Year: 2013

Confidential and Compliant Clouds (Coco Cloud) aims at allowing the cloud users to securely and privately share their data in the cloud. This will increase the trust of users in the cloud services and thus increase their widespread adoption with consequent benefits for the users and in general for digital economy.The outsourced nature of the Cloud, and the inherent loss of control that goes along with that, means that sensitive data must be carefully controlled to ensure it is always protected (in the most appropriate way for a given situation). Protecting data (including personal information) is essential to citizens, governments and organizations across all sectors, including healthcare and banking. Furthermore, it is only by providing assurances on data protection and data usage control, that we can facilitate data sharing between individuals and organisations or between organisations to create new ventures and novel means of leveraging the data value.We envision the control of the disseminated data based on mutually agreed data sharing agreements that are uniformly and end-to-end enforced. These agreements may reflect legal, contractual or user defined preferences, which may be conflicting and thus an appropriate balance and model for their enforcement must be found.The project aims at creating an efficient and flexible framework for secure data management from the client to the cloud, and vice-versa. We consider in particular three dimensions to this goal:i.\tto facilitate the writing, understanding, analysis, management, enforcement and dissolution of data sharing agreements; going from high level descriptions (close to natural language) to system enforceable data usage policies;ii.\tto consider the most appropriate enforcing mechanisms depending on the underlying infrastructure and context for enforcing data usage policies;iii.\tto address key challenges for legally compliant data sharing in the cloud. By taking a compliance by design approach, the project places an early emphasis on understanding and incorporating legal and regulatory requirements into the data sharing agreements.Coco Cloud will contribute to fulfil the pervasive need for data usage protection in cloud services that arises from different stakeholders, including business organizations and citizens, and overcoming the limitations of currently available technology offerings.The project Consortium combines strong industry players and academic institutions which will deliver high quality research and development; it also includes two end-users of the technological solutions as well as a Law firm able to bring significant expertise in legal practice, also for Cloud.The project outcome will be evaluated via three pilot products and one industrial test bed.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: Fission-2012-2.1.1 | Award Amount: 9.33M | Year: 2013

After the 2011 disaster that occurred in Japan, improvement of nuclear safety appears more clearly as a paramount condition for further development of nuclear industry. The NURESAFE project addresses engineering aspects of nuclear safety, especially those relative to design basis accidents (DBA). Although the Japanese event was a severe accident, in a process of defense-in-depth, prevention and control of DBA is obviously one of the priorities in the process of safety improvement. In this respect, the best simulation software are needed to justify the design of reactor protection systems and measures taken to prevent and control accidents. The NURESAFE project addresses safety of light water reactors which will represent the major part of fleets in the world along the whole 21st century. The first objective of NURESAFE is to deliver to European stakeholders a reliable software capacity usable for safety analysis needs and to develop a high level of expertise in the proper use of the most recent simulation tools. Nuclear reactor simulation tools are of course already widely used for this purpose but more accurate and predictive software including uncertainty assessment must allow to quantify the margins toward feared phenomena occurring during an accident and they must be able to model innovative and more complex design features. This software capacity will be based on the NURESIM simulation platform created during FP6 NURESIM project and developed during FP7 NURISP project which achieved its goal by making available an integrated set of software at the state of the art. The objectives under the work-program are to develop practical applications usable for safety analysis or operation and design and to expand the use of the NURESIM platform. Therefore, the NURESAFE project concentrates its activities on some safety relevant situation targets. The main outcome of NURESAFE will be the delivery of multiphysics and fully integrated applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 39.56M | Year: 2013

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability, leading to great personal suffering to victim and relatives, as well as huge direct and indirect costs to society. Strong ethical, medical, social and health economic reasons therefore exist for improving treatment. The CENTER-TBI project will collect a prospective, contemporary, highly granular, observational dataset of 5400 patients, which will be used for better characterization of TBI and for Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER). The generalisability of our results will be reinforced by a contemporaneous registry level data collection in 15-25,000 patients. Our conceptual approach is to exploit the heterogeneity in biology, care, and outcome of TBI, to discover novel pathophysiology, refine disease characterization, and identify effective clinical interventions. Key elements are the use of emerging technologies (biomarkers, genomics and advanced MR imaging) in large numbers of patients, across the entire course of TBI (from injury to late outcome) and across all severities of injury (mild to severe). Improved characterization with these tools will aid Precision Medicine, a concept recently advocated by the US National Academy of Science, facilitating targeted management for individual patients. Our consortium includes leading experts and will bring outstanding biostatistical and neuroinformatics expertise to the project. Collaborations with external partners, other FP7 consortia, and international links within InTBIR, will greatly augment scientific resources and broaden the global scope of our research. We anticipate that the project could revolutionize our view of TBI, leading to more effective and efficient therapy, thus improving outcome and reducing costs. These outcomes reflect the goals of CER to assist consumers, clinicians, health care purchasers, and policy makers to make informed decisions, and will improve healthcare at both individual and population levels.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-23-2014 | Award Amount: 6.96M | Year: 2015

Childrens health affects the future of Europe children are citizens, future workers, parents and carers. Children are dependent on society to provide effective health services (UN Convention on the Rights of the Child). Models of child primary health care vary widely across Europe based on two broad alternatives (primary care paediatricians or generic family doctors), and a variety of models of school health and adolescent direct access services. There is little research to show which model(s) are best, implying that some are inefficient or ineffective, with sub-optimal outcomes. MOCHA will draw on networks, earlier child health projects and local agents to model and evaluate child primary care in all 30 EU/EEA countries. Scientific partners from 11 European countries, plus partners from Australia and USA, encompassing medicine, nursing, economics, informatics, sociology and policy management, will: Categorise the models, and school health and adolescent services Develop innovative measures of quality, outcome, cost, and workforce of each, and apply them using policy documents, routine statistics, and available electronic data sets Assess effects on equality, and on continuity of care with secondary care. Systematically obtain stakeholder views. Indicate optimal future patterns of electronic records and big data to optimise operation of the model(s). The results will demonstrate the optimal model(s) of childrens primary care with a prevention and wellness focus, with an analysis of factors (including cultural) which might facilitate adoption, and indications for policy makers of both the health and economic gains possible. The project will have a strong dissemination programme throughout to ensure dialogue with public, professionals, policy makers, and politicians. The project will take 42 months (36 of scientific work plus start up and close), and deliver major awareness and potential benefit for European childrens health and healthy society.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-03a-2014 | Award Amount: 6.64M | Year: 2015

EMPHASIS is a participatory research project addressing native and alien pests threats (insect pests, pathogens, weeds) for a range of both natural ecosystems and farming systems (field crops, protected crops, forestry, orchards and amenity plants). The overall goal is to ensure a European food security system and the protection of biodiversity and of ecosystems services while developing integrated mechanisms of response measures (practical solutions) to predict, to prevent and to protect agriculture and forestry systems from native and alien pests threats. The specific objectives are the following: 1.Predict, Prioritize and Planning: pest management challenges and opportunities will be evaluated according to stakeholder-focused criteria and through pathway analysis; 2.Prevent: practical solutions for surveillance in different pathways to enhance preparedness will be provided to end-users, and monitoring tools following outbreaks and eradication will be developed; 3.Protect: practical solutions for managing native and alien pests in agriculture, horticulture and forestry will be developed, their technical and economic feasibility will be demonstrated and their market uptake will be enhanced. 4.Promote: a mutual learning process with end-users will be developed, and the solutions identified by the project will be promoted through training and dissemination. The project is in line with EU policy framework (Plant Health Dir. 2000/29/EC, EU Biodiversity strategy to 2020, Dir. 2009/128/EC on sustainable use of pesticides, Roadmap to a Resource Efficient Europe) and its future developments (Reg. on protective measures against pests of plants, Reg. on Invasive Alien Species). The project is not focused on a single management systems but the plant/pest ecosystems dealt with are treated with a multi-method approach to design true IPM methodology that will be developed for key systems with portability to other similar systems, thereby having a large impact.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-1.1-2014 | Award Amount: 5.71M | Year: 2015

This project will focus on the development of technologies and methodologies which have the potential to save costs and time across the whole life cycle of the aircraft (design, production, maintenance, overhaul, repair and retrofit), including for certification aspects. Moreover it will also target the integration of additional functions or materials in structural components of the aircraft, the increased use of automation. The first proposed step is the introduction of the -TiAl alloy, a well known promising advanced material for aerospace applications and a revolutionary manufacturing technology. Its specific stiffness and strength, as compared to its low weight, potentially leads to large weight savings (50%), and therefore lower mechanical loads on thermomechanical stressed parts, compared to the common Ni based superalloys. The integration of new material and new manufacturing technology will positively impact several aspects of the manufacturing and maintenance chain, starting from the design, the production, the repair). The aim of this project is twofold: - On one side the work will be focused on the development and integration at industrial of a IPR protected gas atomization process for producing TiAl powders, whose properties must be highly stable from batch to batch. Thanks to the stability of the chemical and granulometric properties of the powders, the application of the Rapid Manufacturing technique to the production of TiAl components will be economically affordable. While this technique is by now well-known, its main drawback resides in the scarce quality of the starting powders. - The other main drawback for the wide industrial application of TiAl components is the integrated optimisation of all the machining steps, that means the setting up of machine tool characteristics and parameters, cutting tool geometry, substrate and coating materials, advanced lubrication technologies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-SyG | Phase: ERC-2012-SyG | Award Amount: 14.97M | Year: 2013

Few advances in neuroscience could have as much impact as a precise global description of human brain connectivity and its variability. Understanding this connectome in detail will provide insights into fundamental neural processes and intractable neuropsychiatric diseases. The connectome can be studied at millimetre scale in humans by neuroimaging, particularly diffusion and functional connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging. By linking imaging data to genetic, cognitive and environmental information it will be possible to answer previously unsolvable questions concerning normal mental functioning and intractable neuropsychiatric diseases. Current human connectome research relates almost exclusively to the mature brain. However mental capacity and neurodevelopmental diseases are created during early development. Advances in fetal and neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging now allow us to undertake The Developing Human Connectome Project (dHCP) which will make major scientific progress by: creating the first 4-dimensional connectome of early life; and undertake pioneer studies into normal and abnormal development. The dHCP will deliver: the first dynamic map of human brain connectivity from 20 to 44 weeks post-conceptional age, linked to imaging, clinical, behavioural and genetic information; comparative maps of the cerebral connectivity associated with neurodevelopmental abnormality, studying well-characterized patients with either the adverse environmental influence of preterm delivery or genetically-characterised Autistic Spectrum Disorder; and novel imaging and analysis methods in an open-source, outward-facing expandable informatics environment that will provide a scalable resource for the research community and advances in clinical medicine.


Healthspan (the life period when one is generally healthy and free from serious disease) depends on nature (genetic make-up) and nurture (environmental influences, from the earliest stages of development throughout life). Genetic studies increasingly reveal mutations and polymorphisms that may affect healthspan. Similarly, claims abound about lifestyle modifications or treatments improving healthspan. In both cases, rigorous testing is hampered by the long lifespan of model organisms like mice (let alone humans) and the difficulty of introducing genetic changes to examine the phenotype of the altered genome. We will develop C. elegans as a healthspan model. Already validated extensively as an ageing model, this organism can be readily modified genetically, and effects of environmental manipulations on healthspan can be measured in days or weeks. Once validated as a healthspan model, it can be used for an initial assessment of preventive and therapeutic measures for humans, as well as for risk identification and the initial evaluation of potential biomarkers. It will also prove useful to study interactions between genetic and various environmental factors.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.5.1.2 | Award Amount: 9.22M | Year: 2014

ASCENT will provide a robust proof-of-concept of three related high temperature processes; each will lead to a step-change in efficiency of carbon removal in three types of pre-combustion capture, producing the hydrogen needed for highly efficient low-carbon power production. The project brings together five small and medium enterprises preparing to launch these concepts with the support of leading research institutes, universities and industrial partners. The essential feature linking the three technologies is the use of a high temperature solid sorbent for the simultaneous separation of CO2 during conversion of other carbon containing gases (CO and CH4) into H2. Each technology provides a step-change in efficiency because they all separate the CO2 at elevated temperatures (>300C) providing for more efficient heat integration options not available in technologies where the separation occurs at lower temperatures. Each process matches both endothermic and exothermic heat requirements of associated reactions and sorbent regeneration in an integrated in situ approach. The synergies between the three technologies are strong, allowing both multiple interactions between the different work packages and allowing a consistent framework for cross-cutting activities across all the technologies. Each technology will be proven under industrially relevant conditions of pressure and temperature, at a scale that allows the use of industrially relevant materials that can be manufactured at a scale needed for real implementation. This represents a necessary step to be taken for each of the technologies before setting out on the route to future demonstration level activities. ASCENT, Advanced Solid Cycles with Efficient Novel Technologies, addresses the need for original ideas to reduce the energy penalty associated with capturing carbon dioxide during power generation, and create a sustainable market for low carbon emission power with low associated energy penalties


Unlike the control and observability put in service in HV/MV, LV networks are still being substantially managed as usual: no visibility of power and voltage or grid components status, poor knowledge of connectivity, manual operation of switches or few tools for worker support. The LV grid characteristics (radial topology, exposition to local disturbances, local accumulation of distributed generation, technical and no-technical loses, aging heterogeneous, etc.) limit the construction and refurbish of LV electric infrastructure and the integration on it of grid remote monitoring and operation and automation resources, bringing to difficulties in the implementation of the LV Smart Grid and the integration of Distributed Generation Resources and Active Demand Management (ADM). Smart metering deployment Mandates offer an opportunity to maximize the gains derived from the obliged functions to be deployed related to smart metering, developing and integrating additional innovative grid and ICT infrastructure, functions, services and tools improving grid operation performance and quality and paving the way for benefits and business opportunities for the involved actors (DSOs, customers, retailers and ESCOs). The project aims to develop, deploy and demonstrate innovative solutions (grid systems, functions, services and tools) for advanced Operation and Exploitation of LV/MV networks in a fully smart grid environment improving the capacity of that networks as enablers for Distributed Generation, ADM, Customer empowering and business opportunities. The project proposes 4 real pilots in Portugal, Poland, Spain and Sweden covering: Smart grid monitoring and operation, advanced grid maintenance, DER and ADM integration and active Consumer awareness and participation with cost efficiency. Also proposes specific WPs to maximize the socioeconomic impact of results, especially for their market uptake, business opportunities triggering and society awareness on the smart grid benefits


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2012.6.4-3 | Award Amount: 11.29M | Year: 2013

The aim of HELIX is to exploit novel tools and methods (remote sensing/GIS-based spatial methods, omics-based approaches, biomarkers of exposure, exposure devices and models, statistical tools for combined exposures, novel study designs, and burden of disease methodologies), to characterise early-life exposure to a wide range of environmental hazards, and integrate and link these with data on major child health outcomes (growth and obesity, neurodevelopment, immune system), thus developing an Early-Life Exposome approach. HELIX uses six existing, prospective birth cohort studies as the only realistic and feasible way to obtain the comprehensive, longitudinal, human data needed to build this early-life exposome. These cohorts have already collected large amounts of data as part of national and EU-funded projects. Results will be integrated with data from European cohorts (>300,000 subjects) and registers, to estimate health impacts at the large European scale. HELIX will make a major contribution to the integrated exposure concept by developing an exposome toolkit and database that will: 1) measure a wide range of major chemical and physical environmental hazards in food, consumer products, water, air, noise, and the built environment, in pre and postnatal periods; 2) integrate data on individual, temporal, and toxicokinetic variability, and on multiple exposures, which will greatly reduce uncertainty in exposure estimates; 3) determine molecular profiles and biological pathways associated with multiple exposures using omics tools; 4) provide exposure-response estimates and thresholds for multiple exposures and child health; and 5) estimate the burden of childhood disease in Europe due to multiple environmental exposures. This integration of the chemical, physical and molecular environment during critical early-life periods will lead to major improvements in health risk and impact assessments and thus to improved prevention strategies for vulnerable populations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-12-2014 | Award Amount: 8.82M | Year: 2015

Euromix aim to develop an experimentally verified, tiered strategy for the risk assessment of mixtures of multiple chemicals derived from multiple sources across different life stages. The project takes account of the gender dimension and balances the risk of chemicals present in foods against the benefits of those foods. Important concepts for this new strategy are prioritisation criteria for chemicals based on their exposure and hazard characteristics and evaluation of the role of mode of action in grouping chemicals into cumulative assessment groups. In-silico and in-vitro tools will be developed and verified against in-vivo experiments, with focus on four selected endpoints (liver, hormones, development and immunology) to provide a full proof-of-principle. The EuroMix project will result in an innovative platform of bioassays for mixture testing and refined categorisation of chemicals in cumulative assessment groups. New hazard and exposure models will be embedded in a model toolbox, made available for stakeholders through an openly accessible web-based platform. Access to the web-based tools will be facilitated by training. Criteria will be set and guidance will be written on how to use and implement the tiered test strategy. Dissemination and harmonisation of the approach within EU, Codex Alimentarius, and WHO will be achieved by involving a.o. WHO and US-EPA in the project and by the participation of experts playing a key role in helping establish international food safety policies. It is expected that the new mechanism-based strategy, the bioassay platform, the openly accessible web-based model toolbox, and clear guidance on a tiered hazard and exposure test and risk assessment strategy will boost innovation in the public and private sector, provide a sound scientific basis for managing risks to public health from chemical mixtures, ultimately reduce the use of laboratory animals, and support the global discussion of risk assessment policies for mixtures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-01-2014 | Award Amount: 7.27M | Year: 2015

This programme of work will advance the understanding of the combined effects of factors that cause poor lung function, respiratory disability and the development of COPD . This will be achieved by examination of determinants of lung growth and lung function decline within existing cohorts that cover the whole life course, and which have followed, in detail, the respiratory health status of over 25000 European children and adults from the early 1990s to the present day. Following a comprehensive programme of risk factor identification we will generate a predictive risk score. The programme includes 1) identification of behavioural, environmental, occupational, nutritional, other modifiable lifestyle, genetic determinant of poor lung growth, excess lung function decline and occurrence of low lung function, respiratory disability and COPD within existing child and adult cohorts 2) generation of new data to fill gaps in knowledge on pre-conception and transgenerational determinants and risk factors 3) validation of the role of risk factors by integration of data from relevant disciplines, integration of data from the cohort-related population-based biobanks and exploitation of appropriate statistical techniques 4) generation of information on change in DNA methylation patterns to identify epigenetic changes associated with both disease development and exposure to specific risk factors 5) generation of a predictive risk score for individual risk stratification that takes account of the combined effects of factors that cause poor lung growth, lung function decline, respiratory disability, and COPD and 6) implementation of an online interactive tool for personalised risk prediction based which will be disseminated freely and widely to the population, patients and health care providers. The work will provide an evidence base for risk identification at individual and population level that can underpin future preventive and therapeutic strategies and policies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2011.3.7 | Award Amount: 52.35M | Year: 2012

ene.field will deploy up to 1,000 residential fuel cell Combined Heat and Power (micro-CHP) installations, across 11 key Member States. It represents a step change in the volume of fuel cell micro-CHP (micro FC-CHP) deployment in Europe and a meaningful step towards commercialisation of the technology. The programme brings together 9 mature European micro FC-CHP manufacturers into a common analysis framework to deliver trials across all of the available fuel cell CHP technologies. Fuel cell micro-CHP trials will be installed and actively monitored in dwellings across the range of European domestic heating markets, dwelling types and climatic zones, which will lead to an invaluable dataset on domestic energy consumption and micro-CHP applicability across Europe. By learning the practicalities of installing and supporting a fleet of fuel cells with real customers, ene.field partners will take the final step before they can begin commercial roll-out. An increase in volume deployment for the manufacturers involved will stimulate cost reduction of the technology by enabling a move from hand-built products towards serial production and tooling. The ene.field project also brings together over 30 utilities, housing providers and municipalities to bring the products to market and explore different business models for micro-CHP deployment. The data produced by ene.field will be used to provide a fact base for micro FC-CHP, including a definitive environmental lifecycle assessment and cost assessment on a total cost of ownership basis. To inform clear national strategies on micro-CHP within Member States, ene.field will establish the macro-economics and CO2 savings of the technologies in their target markets and make recommendations on the most appropriate policy mechanisms to support the commercialisation of domestic micro-CHP across Europe. Finally ene.field will assess the socio-economic barriers to widespread deployment of micro-CHP and disseminate clear position papers and advice for policy makers to encourage further roll out.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.2-04 | Award Amount: 8.53M | Year: 2014

The DROPSA consortium will create new knowledge and understanding of the damage and losses of fruit crops resulting from pests and pathogens, with a specific focus on the new and emerging threats due to Drosophila suzukii and quarantine pathogens Pseudomonas syringae, Xanthomonas fragariae and X. arboricola. The project will deliver a cost effective approach that can be widely implemented by the EU fruit industry. The aims and objectives are to: Determine the pathways of introduction and spread of D. suzukii and pathogens into the EU and develop preventative strategies and recommendations against the introduction of other dangerous fruit pests and pathogens. Determine the biology, ecology and interaction of these pests and diseases in different regions of Europe. This will involve a comprehensive evaluation of the life cycles, host ranges, capacities to disperse, the identification of natural enemies, plant-pathogen interactions as well as the semiochemicals involved in the behaviour of D. suzukii. The biology will provide the platform to develop practical solutions for sustainable pest control. Develop innovative and effective control options using approved chemicals, semiochemicals, novel antimicrobial compounds and biological control agents as well as cultural practices, sterile insect techniques and new mode of action compounds. The most reliable and effective control options will be combined to optimise an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy. Develop forecasting and decision support systems and risk mapping as a component of IPM. The economic viability of proposed strategies for fruit crop protection will be evaluated and used to support decision making in the implementation of IPM strategies to protect the EU fruit sector. To protect intellectual property (IP) and to undertake dissemination and exploitation actions to maximise the impact and up take of the recommended IPM by commercial fruit growers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BIOTEC-1-2014 | Award Amount: 8.06M | Year: 2015

Mycoplasmas are the smallest cell wall less, free-living microorganisms. The lack of a cell wall makes them resistant to many of the common antibiotics. Every year, infections caused by Mycoplasmas in poultry, cows, and pigs, result in multimillion euros losses in USA and Europe. Currently, there are vaccines against M hyopneumoniae in pigs and M gallisepticum and M synoviae in poultry. However, there is no vaccination against many Mycoplasma species infecting pets, humans and farm animals (ie M bovis cow infection). Mycoplasma species in many cases are difficult to grown in axenic culture and those that grow need a complex media with animal serum. In large scale production of Mycoplasma species for vaccination aside from the high cost of animal serum, more important is the high irreproducibility in the production process and the possible contamination with animal viruses. All this together highlights what European industry needs:i) a defined cheap reproducible medium that is animal serum free and ii) an universal Mycoplasma chassis that could be used in a pipeline to vaccinate against Mycoplasma species, as well as any pathogen. M pneumoniae is an ideal starting point for designing such a vaccine chassis. It has a small genome (860 kb) and it is probably the organism with the most comprehensive systems biology data acquired so far. By genome comparison, metabolic modeling and rationally engineering its genome, we will create a vaccine chassis that will be introduced into an industrial pipeline. The process will be guided by the second world largest industry on animal vaccination (MSD), as well as a SME specialized on peptide display and screening. This will ensure the exploitation and commercialization of our work contributing to maintain Europe privileged position in this field. Our ultimate goal is to meet the needs of the livestock industry,taking care of ethical issues, foreseeable risks, and prepare effective dissemination and training material for the public.


The aim of the project is to develop a completely new manufacturing system for the volume production of miniaturised components by overcoming the challenges on the manufacturing with a wide range of materials (metallic alloys, composites, ceramics and polymers), through: (i) developing a high-throughput, flexible and cost-efficient process by simultaneous electrical-forming and electric-fast-sintering (Micro-FAST); (ii) scaling up the process to an industrial scale; (iii) further developing it towards an industrial production system for micro-/nano-manufacturing. These will be enabled/supported by developing: (i) a new machine concept: Micro-FAST CNC Machine; (ii) an innovative inline monitoring and quality inspection system; (iii) innovative multiscale modelling techniques for the analysis of the micro-structural behaviours of materials and its interactions with the production processes; (iv) new tooling techniques for high-performance tools, and (v) high-performance nano-material systems. The whole development will take into account energy savings, cost and waste reduction, and recycling issues which will be studied thoroughly through an expertise Life-Cycle Assessment. The development should lead to substantial improvements in the manufacture of components at micro and nanoscale with a good balance on cost and performance. The consortium seeks: reduction of the overall manufacturing cost by 50-100%; energy consumption by more than 30-50%; achieving full-density (100% density) components; direct economic gains for the SME participants of up to 5-25%. The whole development will support the EU-wide product innovations involving use of miniature and micro-components in many manufacturing sectors and, especially with difficult-to-cut and difficult-to-form materials. Adopting the production system in industry should help the EU manufacturing sectors to gain new technological and business competiveness significantly.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.3-02 | Award Amount: 1.28M | Year: 2013

The implementation of the European bioeconomy occurs under the impulsion of entrepreneurs (ranging from carbon-based industries to farmers and foresters) and political authorities, assisted by knowledge workers (R&D). The drivers are (1) the search for alternative resources for fossil fuels, (2) the response to climate warming by becoming as CO2 neutral as possible and (3) the industrial demand for new functionalities offered by biobased materials and chemicals. Regions can be encouraged to apply new development strategies. Regions can also be guided to find ways to support, encourage and enhance concrete actions towards the bioeconomy by current and potential entrepreneurs within a bioeconomy. All regions are potentially bioregions, and the BERST project provides tools (sets of criteria, catalogues both of instruments and measures as well as of good practices and case studies, and guidelines for elaborating regional profiles to prepare for smart specialisation strategies) to help regions in their trajectory of bioeconomic development. The aim of this project is to take into account the bioeconomy potential and strategies of a range of different regions in Europe, and therefore to gain understanding of the possibilities and challenges related to the enhancement of biobased economies. The project also provides a support network in order to promote the development of smart specialisation strategies based on regional bioeconomic potential. The results and outcomes of this project will be linked to each regions normal planning and strategic development processes, and therefore to give additional tools for the regions to enhance their bioeconomies. This also means to promote stakeholder relations within bioregions, so that entrepreneurs can guide regional priorities in the development of the bioeconomy. The outcome of the project with both a toolkit and an operating bioregional network is intended to be taken over by the nascent EU Bioeconomy Observatory.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.3.3-1 | Award Amount: 6.59M | Year: 2013

This project focuses on the systematic promotion and facilitation of active mobility (AM) (i.e. walking and cycling including the combination with public transport use) as an innovative approach to integrate physical activity (PA) into individuals everyday lives. In contrast to sports or exercise, AM requires less time and motivation, since AM provides both convenience as a mode of transport, and a healthy lifestyle. As such it has potential to reach parts of the population which have not been receptive to the appeals and benefits of sports and exercise. The objectives of the project are the following: The project will review the literature on AM and identify innovative measures and systematic initiatives to promote AM as well as traffic safety interventions. A longitudinal study will be conducted to evaluate the ongoing AM initiatives combined with traffic safety interventions to better understand correlates of AM and their effects on overall PA, injury risk and exposure to air pollution. An improved user-friendly tool for more comprehensive health impact assessment (HIA) of AM will be developed. The tool will be applied to AM behavior observed in the case study cities and allow the assessment of health and economic impacts of measures. The project will also produce a compendium of good practices of AM promotion aimed at decision makers, implementing authorities, businesses, civil society organizations and end users. Findings and progress reports will be communicated to diverse target audiences, including policy makers, practitioners, researchers and end-users, through a number of media, i.e. reports, journals, brochures, web-content, workshops and presentations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.3.1 | Award Amount: 17.80M | Year: 2013

To extend beyond existing limits in nanodevice fabrication, new and unconventional lithographic technologies are necessary to reach Single Nanometer Manufacturing (SNM) for novel Beyond CMOS devices. Two approaches are considered: scanning probe lithography (SPL) and focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP). Our project tackles this challenge by employing SPL and FEBIP with novel small molecule resist materials. The goal is to work from slow direct-write methods to high speed step-and-repeat manufacturing by Nano Imprint Lithography (NIL), developing methods for precise generation, placement, metrology and integration of functional features at 3 - 5 nm by direct write and sub-10nm into a NIL-template. The project will first produce a SPL-tool prototype and will then develop and demonstrate an integrated process flow to establish proof-of-concept Beyond CMOS devices employing developments in industrial manufacturing processes (NIL, plasma etching) and new materials (Graphene, MoS2). By the end of the project: (a) SNM technology will be used to demonstrate novel room temperature single electron and quantum effect devices; (b) a SNM technology platform will be demonstrated, showing an integrated process flow, based on SPL prototype tools, electron beam induced processing, and finally pattern transfer at industrial partner sites. An interdisciplinary team (7 Industry and 8 Research/University partners) from experienced scientists will be established to cover specific fields of expertise: chemical synthesis, scanning probe lithography, FEBIP-Litho, sub-3nm design and device fabrication, single nanometer etching, and Step-and-Repeat NIL- and novel alignment system design. The project coordinator is a University with great experience in nanostructuring and European project management where the executive board includes European industry leaders such as IBM, IMEC, EVG, and Oxford Instruments.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.5.2 | Award Amount: 18.10M | Year: 2013

The DementiA Research Enabled by IT project responds to the European Parliaments 2011 resolution for a European Initiative on Alzheimers disease and other dementias, and the EU Year of the Brain 2014 Initiative. It delivers the first patient-specific predictive models for early differential diagnosis of dementias and their evolution. Its mechanistic/phenomenological models of the ageing brain account simultaneously for the patient-specific multiscale biochemical, metabolic and biomechanical brain substrate, as well as for genetic, clinical, demographic and lifestyle determinants. It investigates the effect of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, diets, exercise, and pulmonary conditions on the ageing brain, as environmental factors influencing onset and evolution of dementias.\n\nAn integrated clinical decision support platform will be validated/ tested by access to a dozen databases of international cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, including exclusive access to a population study that has tracked brain ageing in more than 10,000 individuals for over 20 years (Rotterdam Study).\n\nEnabling more objective, earlier, predictive and individualised diagnosis and prognosis of dementias will support health systems worldwide to cope with the burden of 36M patients that, due to ageing societies, will increase to 115M by 2050. Worldwide costs are estimated to 450B annually. In 2012, the WHO declared dementia a global health priority.\n\nOur consortium assembles highly recognised engineering, physical, biomedical and clinical scientists, and industrial partners experienced in exploiting VPH technologies in healthcare. Co-operation with infrastructure projects like VPH-Share, related international Physiome efforts, and other dementia research consortia is assured, allowing European researchers from different disciplines to contribute to share resources, methods and generate new knowledge.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.3.7.1 | Award Amount: 5.16M | Year: 2013

The main aim of this project is to support the sustainable delivery of non-food biomass feedstock at local, regional and pan European level through developing strategies, and roadmaps that will be informed by a computerized and easy to use toolset (and respective databases) with update harmonized datasets at local, regional, national and pan European level for EU27, western Balkans, Turkey and Ukraine. It will do so by comparing and making use of the most recent relevant information from recent and ongoing EU projects by a set of carefully selected validation case studies and in concise collaboration with key stakeholders from policy, industry and markets.The project fits under the overall umbrella of the Europe 2020 strategy for the building of a bioeconomy, as well as the targets for deployment of renewable energies and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.The project will build up a concise knowledge base both for the sustainable supply and logistics of nonfood biomass (quantities, costs, technological pathway options for 2020 and beyond), for the development of technology and market strategies to support the development of a resource efficient Bioeconomy for Europe. This includes industrial processes (i.e. bio-based industries) for manufacturing biomass-derived goods/products as well as energy conversion, both for large scale and small scale units.The research work will be organized in three individual but strongly interrelated Themes: Theme 1 will focus on methodological approaches, data collection and estimation of sustainable biomass potentials, resource efficient pathways and optimal logistical supply routes as well as will develop the computerized toolset. Theme 2 will make use of the findings of Theme 1 and develop a Vision, Strategies and an R&D roadmap for the sustainable delivery of non-food biomass feedstock at local, regional and pan European level. Theme 3 will validate the findings from Themes 1 and 2 and ensure the project outreach


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.93M | Year: 2014

TEMPO addresses the needs of European companies and society for embedded control technology, through training on cutting edge research in the rapidly emerging inter-disciplinary field of embedded predictive control and optimization. The key objectives are: - to expand the scientific and technical knowledge platform for Embedded Predictive Control and Optimization in Europe; - to exploit this platform to train a new generation of world class researchers and professionals that are highly attractive for employment by the European industry; - to establish structures for long-term cooperation and strengthen the relations among the leading universities and industry in Europe in this field, to continuously develop the research training platform that European industry relies on. To achieve the objectives listed above, the main tasks of TEMPO are: - to attract and train 14 Early Stage Researchers in embedded MPC and optimization via a joint academic/industrial program of cutting edge training-by-research, high quality supervision, complementary and transferable skills training, inter-network secondments, and workshops; - to create a closely connected group of leading European scientists that are highly sought after by European industry, and ready to push forward embedded MPC and optimization into new innovative products, industries and services; - to build a solid foundation for long-term European excellence in this field by disseminating the research and training outcomes and best practice of TEMPO into the doctoral schools of the partners, and by fostering long-term partnerships and collaboration mechanisms that will outlast the ITN; - to disseminate the know-how of the participants to each other and to external groups via networking activities, inter-sectoral exposure, secondments, workshops, demonstrations, sharing of learning material, public engagement and outreach activities, and open source public domain software outcomes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 4.10M | Year: 2015

Cement production for the construction industry contributes up to 5% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Developing more environmentally friendly concrete requires the assessment of strength for a diverse range of new cement materials. Similar issues arise during the development of biocompatible cements for medical applications. Properties of naturally cemented materials of organic origin are of key importance in the oil industry, with carbonate reservoirs prone to creep, particularly during the injection of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery or permanent storage. However, despite the importance of cement materials to our infrastructure, health and environment, we still lack the fundamental basis for understanding the strength of cemented aggregates. Granular pastes and sediments transform to strong solids through reactions at nano-confined mineral interfaces, where nucleation and growth at the adjacent solid surfaces are affected in a manner not yet understood. There is a need for improved concepts, theories and models. NanoHeal targets this issue by bringing six industrial and six academic groups together in a European Training Network (ETN), in an emerging interdisciplinary field spanning from basic sciences to the corresponding engineering disciplines. NanoHeal will deliver an outstanding environment for training and career development of young researchers. The aims of NanoHeal are to: develop innovative probes and models for nanoscale processes that open novel perspectives in design and control of organo-mineral materials. measure and improve the strength and durability of 1) new man-made cemented materials like green concrete, speciality cements in construction and oil and gas recovery, and biocompatible implants and 2) natural sedimentary rocks inside reservoirs and as construction materials educate young interdisciplinary researchers at the interface between fundamental science and European industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-4-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 14.84M | Year: 2015

The social and economic challenges of ageing populations and chronic disease can only be met by translation of biomedical discoveries to new, innovative and cost effective treatments. The ESFRI Biological and Medical Research Infrastructures (BMS RI) underpin every step in this process; effectively joining scientific capabilities and shared services will transform the understanding of biological mechanisms and accelerate its translation into medical care. Biological and medical research that addresses the grand challenges of health and ageing span a broad range of scientific disciplines and user communities. The BMS RIs play a central, facilitating role in this groundbreaking research: inter-disciplinary biomedical and translational research requires resources from multiple research infrastructures such as biobank samples, and resources from multiple research infrastructures such as biobank samples, imaging facilities, molecular screening centres or animal models. Through a user-led approach CORBEL will develop the tools, services and data management required by cutting-edge European research projects: collectively the BMS RIs will establish a sustained foundation of collaborative scientific services for biomedical research in Europe and embed the combined infrastructure capabilities into the scientific workflow of advanced users. Furthermore CORBEL will enable the BMS RIs to support users throughout the execution of a scientific project: from planning and grant applications through to the long-term sustainable management and exploitation of research data. By harmonising user access, unifying data management, creating common ethical and legal services, and offering joint innovation support CORBEL will establish and support a new model for biological and medical research in Europe. The BMS RI joint platform will visibly reduce redundancy and simplify project management and transform the ability of users to deliver advanced, cross-disciplinary research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-20-2015 | Award Amount: 7.28M | Year: 2016

Although online education is a paramount pillar of formal, non-formal and informal learning, institutions may still be reluctant to wager for a fully online educational model. As such, there is still a reliance on face-to-face assessment, since online alternatives do not have the deserved expected social recognition and reliability. Thus, the creation of an e-assessment system that will be able to provide effective proof of student identity, authorship within the integration of selected technologies in current learning activities in a scalable and cost efficient manner would be very advantageous. The TeSLA project provides to educational institutions, an adaptive trust e-assessment system for assuring e-assessment processes in online and blended environments. It will support both continuous and final assessment to improve the trust level across students, teachers and institutions. The system will be developed taking into account quality assurance agencies in education, privacy and ethical issues and educational and technological requirements throughout Europe. It will follow the interoperability standards for integration into different learning environment systems providing a scalable and adaptive solution. The TeSLA system will be developed to reduce the current restrictions of time and physical space in teaching and learning, which opens up new opportunities for learners with physical or mental disabilities as well as respecting social and cultural differences. Given the innovative action of the project, the current gap in e-assessment and the growing number of institutions interested in offering online education, the project will conduct large scale pilots to evaluate and assure the reliability of the TeSLA system. By the nature of the product, dissemination will be performed across schools, higher education institutions and vocational training centres. A free version will be distributed, although a commercial-premium version will be launched on the market.


Howes O.D.,Imperial College London | Howes O.D.,King's College London | Murray R.M.,King's College London
The Lancet | Year: 2014

Schizophrenia remains a major burden on patients and society. The dopamine hypothesis attempts to explain the pathogenic mechanisms of the disorder, and the neurodevelopmental hypothesis the origins. In the past 10 years an alternative, the cognitive model, has gained popularity. However, the first two theories have not been satisfactorily integrated, and the most influential iteration of the cognitive model makes no mention of dopamine, neurodevelopment, or indeed the brain. In this Review we show that developmental alterations secondary to variant genes, early hazards to the brain, and childhood adversity sensitise the dopamine system, and result in excessive presynaptic dopamine synthesis and release. Social adversity biases the cognitive schema that the individual uses to interpret experiences towards paranoid interpretations. Subsequent stress results in dysregulated dopamine release, causing the misattribution of salience to stimuli, which are then misinterpreted by the biased cognitive processes. The resulting paranoia and hallucinations in turn cause further stress, and eventually repeated dopamine dysregulation hardwires the psychotic beliefs. Finally, we consider the implications of this model for understanding and treatment of schizophrenia.


Leader E.,Imperial College London | Lorce C.,University Paris - Sud | Lorce C.,University of Liège
Physics Reports | Year: 2014

The general question, crucial to an understanding of the internal structure of the nucleon, of how to split the total angular momentum of a photon or gluon into spin and orbital contributions is one of the most important and interesting challenges faced by gauge theories like Quantum Electrodynamics and Quantum Chromodynamics. This is particularly challenging since all QED textbooks state that such a splitting cannot be done for a photon (and a fortiori for a gluon) in a gauge-invariant way, yet experimentalists around the world are engaged in measuring what they believe is the gluon spin! This question has been a subject of intense debate and controversy, ever since, in 2008, it was claimed that such a gauge-invariant split was, in fact, possible. We explain in what sense this claim is true and how it turns out that one of the main problems is that such a decomposition is not unique and therefore raises the question of what is the most natural or physical choice. The essential requirement of measurability does not solve the ambiguities and leads us to the conclusion that the choice of a particular decomposition is essentially a matter of taste and convenience. In this review, we provide a pedagogical introduction to the question of angular momentum decomposition in a gauge theory, present the main relevant decompositions and discuss in detail several aspects of the controversies regarding the question of gauge invariance, frame dependence, uniqueness and measurability. We stress the physical implications of the recent developments and collect into a separate section all the sum rules and relations which we think experimentally relevant. We hope that such a review will make the matter amenable to a broader community and will help to clarify the present situation. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Johnson R.W.,Royal Infirmary | Rice A.S.C.,Imperial College London
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2014

A 73-year-old woman presents with persistent pain and itching in the right T10 dermatome from just above the thoracolumbar junction to the umbilicus since a documented episode of herpes zoster in the same region 1 year earlier. She describes a severe, continuous "burning" pain, unpredictable paroxysms of lancinating pain lasting a few seconds, and intense hypersensitivity to light tactile stimulation, such as clothing brushing against the skin. On physical examination, there are signs of cutaneous scarring throughout the right T10 dermatome, with areas of excoriation caused by scratching. She has patchy loss of tactile perception in this distribution as well as areas of pain provoked by a light brush. Acetaminophen did not help her pain. How would you manage this patient's condition?. © 2014 Massachusetts Medical Society.


Nielsen C.B.,Imperial College London | Turbiez M.,BASF | McCulloch I.,Imperial College London
Advanced Materials | Year: 2013

This progress report summarizes the numerous DPP-containing polymers recently developed for field-effect transistor applications including diphenyl-DPP and dithienyl-DPP-based polymers as the most commonly reported materials, but also difuranyl-DPP, diselenophenyl-DPP and dithienothienyl-DPP- containing polymers. We discuss the hole and electron mobilities that were reported in relation to structural properties such as alkyl substitution patterns, polymer molecular weights and solid state packing, as well as electronic properties including HOMO and LUMO energy levels. We moreover consider important aspects of ambipolar charge transport and highlight fundamental structure-property relations such as the relationships between the thin film morphologies and the charge carrier mobilities observed for DPP-containing polymers. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.78M | Year: 2013

Organic Bioelectonics is a new discipline which holds promise to shape, direct, and change future medical treatments in a revolutionary manner over the next decades. At the moment Europe has a unique leading position in this area, being almost all the world-leading groups in this field located in Europe and constituting the core of this international training network. However, realizing the promise of Organic bioelectronics requires research and training not only crossing disciplines, such as electrical engineering, biology, chemistry, physics, and materials science, but also crossing our European countries. The EU will add value on the global scene only if it acts jointly. OrgBIO is at the core of European technological innovation and will become an indispensable part of the educational canon. It will establish a world-class training platform spreading around the highly interdisciplinary / intersectorial European-led area of organic bioelectronics. Education along with science and entrepreneurial mindsets and attitudes is the core of the OrgBIO training programme, which aims at excellence and innovation, at all level. Excellence in science is guaranteed by the world-leading groups which founded this research area. Innovation in education is guaranteed by the involvement of researchers on education, business experts. Using different sensors, actuators, electronic and interconnect technologies the network will develop multifunctional systems based on organic devices and materials with high sensitivity that are also flexible, conformable and present over large areas for various biomedical / biological applications in the life science. Multi-analyte and disposable analytical systems manufactured by large-area printing methods will provide services to the individuals and healthcare community. Targeted implemented interactions with a wide network of venture capitals and business actors will immediately transfer the research outcome to the European Industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.16M | Year: 2017

In the Roadmap for Mental Health and Wellbeing Research in Europe (ROAMER), top-priority is research into child and adolescent mental health symptoms. CAPICE (Childhood and Adolescence Psychopathology: unravelling the complex etiology by a large Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Europe) will address this priority. This network will elaborate on the EArly Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium, a well-established collaboration of the many European birth and adolescent population based (twin and family) cohorts with unique longitudinal information on lifestyle, family environment, health, and emotional and behavioral problems. Phenotypic and genome-wide genotypic data are available for over 60,000 children, in addition to genome-wide genotypes for over 20,000 mothers and epigenome-wide data for over 6,000 children. Combined with the enormous progress in methodology, the results of the research performed in this network will greatly expand our knowledge regarding the etiology of mental health symptoms in children and adolescents and shed light on possible targets for prevention and intervention, e.g. by drug target validation. Moreover, it will provide Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) with an excellent training in the psychiatric genomics field given by a multidisciplinary team of eminent scientists from the academic and non-academic sector highly experienced in e.g., gene-environment interaction and covariation analyses, (epi)genome-wide association studies, Mendelian Randomization (MR) and polygenic analyses. With a focus on common and debilitating problems in childhood and adolescence, including depression, anxiety and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, CAPICE will contribute to improving later outcomes of young people in European countries with child and adolescent psychopathology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2012.4.1-3 | Award Amount: 5.16M | Year: 2013

We will examine the life cycle of rare earth metals used in magnetic phase change technologies. Our primary focus is on room temperature magnetic cooling, a near-market solid state alternative to gas compression in which a phase change magnetocaloric material is magnetised by a permanent magnet. We will address the fabrication, manufacture and use of the magnetocaloric material, aiming: (1) to reduce consumption and eliminate wastage of rare earths during the scalable manufacture of magnetocaloric parts; and (2) to drastically reduce the volume of rare earth permament magnet through a step-change improvement in the performance of low-rare earth or rare earth-free magnetocaloric materials. Such developments will reduce both raw material use and future technology cost, providing the necessary bridge between state-of-the art prototyping activity and industrially scalable production of magnetic cooling engines. The project consortium includes materials physicists, researchers active in the industrial scale-up of parts manufacture, a magnet and magnetocaloric material supplier and an SME. This combination will provide feedback between fundamental magnetocaloric material properties, material performance under test, and potential impact on product design. A large-scale end-user partner will provide analyses of the life cycle, environmental and cost benefits of our research to the domestic refrigeration sector. The knowledge gained from our activities will be used in parallel for the development of magnetocaloric materials for a longer-term application: thermomagnetic power generation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: BBI-RIA | Phase: BBI.R10-2015 | Award Amount: 3.77M | Year: 2016

The BIOrescue project aims to develop and demonstrate a new innovative biorefinery concept based on the cascading use of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) supplemented by wheat straw (and other seasonal underutilised lignocellulosic feedstocks. i.e pruning residues, residual citrus peels and wastes). This new concept will avoid disposal and allow for the production of some biodegradable bio-based products and bioactive compounds that will help to replace the existing ones based on fossil resources. The research will help to expand the business opportunities of the mushroom cultivation farms, and the know-how and business opportunities of all the partners involved. The main innovations are: - Improved methods for the lab-based rapid (NIR) analysis of biomass - Innovative two step fractionation of SMS - Synergic effects for complete SMS glucan hydrolysis - Innovative enzyme immobilisation strategy - Development of highly efficient glucan-enzymes - Novel lignin based nano- and micro-carriers - Biopesticide production from monomeric sugars SMS derived and their packaging into nanocarriers The consortium involved is a representation of some BIC members including a large company (Monaghan Mushrooms) which is leading the proposal and some SMEs (MetGen Oy and CLEA Technologies) and BIC associate members (University of Naples and CENER). Additionally other relevant partners with well-known expertise in their respective areas contribute to the objectives. Among them some research organisations (Imperial College of London and Max Planck Institute of Polymers) and Innovative SMEs (Celignis Limited, Zabala Innovation Consulting, Greenovate Europe and C-TECH Innovation Ltd). The synergies between large industry and SMEs go beyond the scope of this project. There is a lot of potential for collaboration between agricultural industry (Monaghan) and biotechnology (MetGen and CLEA) to provide novel solutions for continuous circular economy in large agriculture-based value-chains.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: CULT-COOP-08-2016 | Award Amount: 2.37M | Year: 2016

Pluggable Social Platform for Heritage Awareness and Participation (PLUGGY) will support citizens in shaping cultural heritage and being shaped by it. PLUGGY will enable them to share their local knowledge and everyday experience with others. The participation will include the contribution of cultural institutions and digital libraries, building extensive networks around a common interest in connecting past, present and future. PLUGGY frames its objectives around the Faro Convention, in line with new social paradigms which declare heritage as an asset and a responsibility for all, aiming to encompass greater democratic participative actions with concern for the local and the everyday. The PLUGGY Social Platform will facilitate a continuing process for creating, modifying and safeguarding heritage where citizens will be prosumers and maintainers of cultural activities. It will be web based, easily accessed and will allow the development of shared identity and differentiation. PLUGGY Social Platforms users will curate stories using the PLUGGY Curatorial Tool. Content will be both crowdsourced and retrieved from digital collections, allowing users to create links between seemingly unrelated facts, events, people and digitized collections, leading to new approaches of presenting cultural resources, and new ways of experiencing them. PLUGGY will provide the necessary architecture for the creation of pluggable applications, allowing for beyond-the-project, not yet imagined ways to utilize the content on the social platform, while focusing on the design of the social interaction, helping to build new virtual heritage communities. The PLUGGY consortium spans 5 countries and includes 4 academic partners (ICCS, TUK, UMA, ICL), a total of 10 museums (PIOP, ESM) and 3 SMEs (CLIO, VIA, XTS) in the fields of cultural heritage and creative applications. They cover the areas of cultural heritage, social platforms, authoring tools, VR/AR, knowledge management, semantics and 3D audio.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2012.3.2 | Award Amount: 7.36M | Year: 2013

This project aims at improving the robustness, manufacturability, efficiency and cost of Fuel Cells state-of-the-art SOFC stacks so as to reach market entry requirements. We propose a focused project addressing the key issues that have manifested themselves in the course of the ongoing product development efforts at Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S (TOFC). The key issues are the mechanical robustness of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), and the delicate interplay between cell properties, stack design, and operating conditions of the SOFC stack. The novelty of the project lies in combining state of the art methodologies for cost-optimal reliability-based design (COPRD) with actual production optimization. To achieve the COPRD beyond state of the art multi-physical modelling concepts must be developed and validated for significantly improved understanding of the production and operation of SOFC stacks. The key to this understanding is validating experiments and models on multiple levels of the SOFC system and introduction of extensive test programs specified by the COPRD methodology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2012.10.2.1 | Award Amount: 3.55M | Year: 2013

Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is the leading technology of third-generation solution-processed solar cells with reported efficiencies in excess of 10%. However despite the huge efforts in the last two decades saturation effects are observed in their performance. Efforts so far have been concentrated towards engineering and fine-tuning of the dyes, the electrolytes and the interface of the dye to the electron acceptor, employing titania as the electron acceptor. DSSCs rely, then, on dyes for efficient light harvesting which in turn entails high fabrication costs associated to the Ru-based dyes as well as the use of 10 um thick devices. In addition, optimized titania requires high-temperature processing raising concerns for its potential for low-cost, flexible-platform fabrication. In this project we propose a disruptive approach; to replace titania with a novel electron accepting nanoporous semiconductor with a bandgap suitable for optimized solar harnessing and a very high absorption coefficient to allow total light absorption within 2 um across its absorption spectrum. In addition the deposition of the nanostructured platform will employ processing below 200oC, compatible with plastic, flexible substrates and cost-effective roll-to-roll manufacturing. We will focus on non-toxic high-abundance nanomaterials in order to enable successful deployment of DSSCs with targeted efficiencies in excess of 15% and 10% for SS-DSSCs, thanks to efficient solar harnessing offered by the novel nanocrystal electron acceptor. To tackle this multidisciplinary challenge we have assembled a group of experts in the respective fields: development of nanocrystal solar cells, DSSC technology and physics, atomic layer and surface characterisation and a technology leader (industrial partner) in the manufacturing and development of third generation, thin film, photovoltaic cells and modules (DSSCs).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-09-2015 | Award Amount: 28.14M | Year: 2016

Many HIV vaccine concepts and several efficacy trials have been conducted in the prophylactic and therapeutic fields with limited success. There is an urgent need to develop better vaccines and tools predictive of immunogenicity and of correlates of protection at early stage of vaccine development to mitigate the risks of failure. To address these complex and challenging scientific issues, the European HIV Vaccine Alliance (EHVA) program will develop a Multidisciplinary Vaccine Platform (MVP) in the fields of prophylactic and therapeutic HIV vaccines. The Specific Objectives of the MVP are to build up: 1.Discovery Platform with the goal of generating novel vaccine candidates inducing potent neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibody responses and T-cell responses, 2. Immune Profiling Platform with the goal of ranking novel and existing (benchmark) vaccine candidates on the basis of the immune profile, 3. Data Management/Integration/Down-Selection Platform, with the goal of providing statistical tools for the analysis and interpretation of complex data and algorithms for the efficient selection of vaccines, and 4. Clinical Trials Platform with the goal of accelerating the clinical development of novel vaccines and the early prediction of vaccine failure. EHVA project has developed a global and innovative strategy which includes: a) the multidisciplinary expertise involving immunologists, virologists, structural biology experts, statisticians and computational scientists and clinicians; b) the most innovative technologies to profile immune response and virus reservoir; c) the access to large cohort studies bringing together top European clinical scientists/centres in the fields of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, d) the access to a panel of experimental HIV vaccines under clinical development that will be used as benchmark, and e) the liaison to a number of African leading scientists/programs which will foster the testing of future EHVA vaccines through EDCTP


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 2.34M | Year: 2015

Optical laser-based technologies are a key technology of the 21st century. Extension of the range of scientific and commercial laser applications requires a constant expansion of the accessible regimes of laser operation. Concepts from nonlinear optics, driven with ultra-fast lasers provide all means to achieve this goal. However, nonlinear optics typically suffer from low efficiencies, e.g. if high-order processes are involved or if the driving laser pulse intensities must be limited below damage thresholds (e.g. in nonlinear microscopy of living cells, or nonlinear spectroscopy of com-bustion processes). Hence, we require methods to enhance nonlinear optical processes. The field of coherent control provides techniques to manipulate laser-matter interactions. The idea is to use appropriately designed light-matter interactions to steer quantum systems towards a desired out-come, e.g. to support nonlinear optical processes. The goal of HICONO is to combine the concepts of coherent control with high-intensity nonlinear-optical interactions. The particular aim is to enhance the efficiency of nonlinear optical processes and extend the range of high-intensity laser applications. HICONO will develop new coherent con-trol strategies matched to high-intensity nonlinear optics. This will push high-order frequency con-version towards larger output yield, enable novel applications in high-resolution spectroscopy and microscopy, and drive novel technologies for ultra-short pulse generation and characterization. The close cooperation of HICONO with industry partners will lead to commercially relevant devices. In terms of training, HICONO aims at the development of young researchers with appropriate skills to exploit the concepts of high-intensity laser technologies, laser-based control, and applied nonlinear optics. HICONO provides a unique, very broad and technology-oriented early-stage training program with strong exposure of the fellows to industry environment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EID | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-EID | Award Amount: 3.63M | Year: 2016

The typical lifetime of an industrial process plant is between 30 and 50 years. Technologies to enhance the operation and optimization of process plants can both guide the development of new state-of-the-art process plants and, perhaps more pertinently, can ensure that the large installed base of existing plants operates efficiently. The PRONTO Consortium partners are strongly convinced that for Europe to stay competitive, the overriding challenge is the efficient and sustainable operation of assets already installed and running at the present time. Production involves flows of material and energy over an extended area through the distributed and interconnected equipment of the process network. Process plants also generate complex information from disparate sources in the form of measurements from the process, mechanical and electrical sub-systems, and elsewhere. Efficient and sustainable operation of assets over a timescale of 30-50 years therefore requires sophisticated approaches for managing information and managing resources to ensure optimal operation. The research topics of PRONTO are (i) data analytics for assessment of the condition and performance of networks of equipment used for production in the process industries, (ii) optimization of use of resources in process networks taking account of real-time information about the condition and performance of the process equipment, and (iii) new concepts for process operation identified as having high potential for impact by industrial partners. The consortium partners include leading universities and well-known companies with high reputations for innovation. The consortium offers the early stage researchers training under the European Industrial Doctorate scheme by involving the non-academic sector extensively in joint supervision of the doctoral training with a strong emphasis on industrially-relevant PhD projects leading to practical demonstrations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.79M | Year: 2014

Research and training in TheLink spans the material development chain for nanostructured polymers. These materials, including phase separated polymers and composites, are attracting scientific and industrial interest due to the outstanding properties and functionalities that can be achieved. However, to exploit the potential of these materials an in-depth understanding of the relationship between nano/micro structures and macro-level properties is required. TheLink aims to generate this knowledge on an interdisciplinary basis combining simulation, characterisation and processing. The recruited fellows will take nanomaterial development beyond trial and error towards a knowledge-based and industrially feasible approach. Three case studies (phase separated polymers and composites, separation membranes and self-diagnosing polymers) will be used to guide the research and to demonstrate the project developments. Careful attention will also be paid to broader market requirements and standardisation. High-quality individualised training in scientific and transferable skills, and a structured network program of training units, will provide the fellows with unique interdisciplinary competence in simulation, characterisation and processing, and move them from theoretical investigations towards industrial application and entrepreneurship. The active involvement of industrial partners, secondments in applied research and industry and a strong research and training emphasis on market requirements will furthermore provide them with the intersectoral experience needed for a career in the development of nanostructured polymers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.83M | Year: 2016

Metabolic disorders are at pandemic levels. Based on recent estimates, ~50% of Europeans are overweight, 20% are obese and 10% have type II diabetes. Obesity and insulin resistance impact European health to the tune of 110 billion per year. These disorders have genetic, nutritional and lifestyle causes. However, the molecular mechanisms that link nutrients and lifestyle to gene activity and chromatin are poorly understood, and drug targets are only starting to be identified. Pioneering experiments by ChroMe labs now reveal how sugars, exercise, the gut microbiome and novel drugs regulate chromatin. These novel links promise to substantially improve our understanding and treatment of metabolic disorders. National governments and the EU invest major resources to address the burden of the metabolic syndrome. However, there is an urgent need for expert human capital able to dissect metabolic diseases, exploit new targets and establish innovative therapies. No local nor international program currently provides adequate training at this emerging interface of chromatin and metabolism. ChroMe establishes a timely and intersectorial ETN that exploits Europes strengths in epigenetics, physiology and medicine to translate our molecular knowledge of chromatinmetabolism interactions into therapies. Our ESRs receive advanced training in emerging technologies, bioinformatic and translational approaches, and all engage in collaborative PhD projects co-supervised by academia and industry. ChroMes extensive transferable skills, dissemination and public engagement program equips our ESRs with the experience and personal network needed for a career in metabolic health. By systematically involving the non-academic sector at every level in our research, training and management, ChroMe will craft future European leaders with the necessary knowledge and skills to fight the metabolic syndrome pandemic.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.2.1 | Award Amount: 5.91M | Year: 2013

The goal of this project is to realize an exoskeletal robot that improves the balance performance of humans, targeted at users facing balance-challenging conditions or suffering from a lack of ability to walk or maintain balance during walking. The proposed exoskeleton will know the difference between the onset of a fall and an intentional change of walking pattern, such as a turn, or a step/stair and only when necessary will it act to maintain postural balance. Available exoskeletons lack the ability to correct or assist postural balance and due to size, weight and controls; they often impede balance.The proposed exoskeleton is human-cooperative in the sense that the control of the exoskeleton is complementary to the remaining human control. Depending on application it can either assist only in difficult conditions or in case of erroneous behaviour of the user, or can assist the user maximally. Supported tasks are functional standing and walking, in a clinical, real-life or work environment, including specific actions like turning or stepping on or off an elevation.The basic concept is to understand how human postural control is structured, how and why it functions and is robust in healthy humans, and to use this knowledge to mimic and enhance the postural control through the exoskeleton in a minimally obtrusive manner. BALANCE will study and implement both anticipatory and reactive balancing mechanisms, and implement a sense of balance and sense of human motion intentions through sensor fusion techniques and data analysis. The ultimate goal is to have the exoskeleton seamlessly cooperate with the human, both for healthy and neurologically impaired subjects.A consortium of specialists in exoskeleton hardware development, human motor control, exoskeleton control, adaptive robot control, gait mechanics, biomechanical sensing and balance assessment technology has gathered in BALANCE to achieve these objectives. The exploitation of the results will focus on applications in neurorehabilitation and worker support.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETPROACT-01-2016 | Award Amount: 7.98M | Year: 2017

A novel concept for a photo-electro-catalytic (PEC) cell able to directly convert water and CO2 into fuels and chemicals (CO2 reduction) and oxygen (water oxidation) using exclusively solar energy will be designed, built, validated, and optimized. The cell will be constructed from cheap multifunction photo-electrodes able to transform sun irradiation into an electrochemical potential difference (expected efficiency > 12%); ultra-thin layers and nanoparticles of metal or metal oxide catalysts for both half-cell reactions (expected efficiency > 90%); and stateof- the-art membrane technology for gas/liquid/products separation to match a theoretical target solar to fuels efficiency above 10%. All parts will be assembled to maximize performance in pH > 7 solution and moderate temperatures (50-80 C) as to take advantage of the high stability and favorable kinetics of constituent materials in these conditions. Achieving this goal we will improve the state-of-the-art of all components for the sake of cell integration: 1) Surface sciences: metal and metal oxide catalysts (crystals or nanostructures grown on metals or silicon) will be characterized for water oxidation and CO2 reduction through atomically resolved experiments (scanning probe microscopy) and spatially-averaged surface techniques including surface analysis before, after and in operando electrochemical reactions. Activity and performance will be correlated to composition, thickness, structure and support as to determine the optimum parameters for device integration. 2) Photoelectrodes: This unique surface knowledge will be transferred to the processing of catalytic nanostructures deposited on semiconductors through different methods to match the surface chemistry results through viable up-scaling processes. Multiple thermodynamic and kinetic techniques will be used to characterize and optimize the performance of the interfaces with spectroscopy and photo-electrochemistry tools to identify best matching between light absorbers and chemical catalysts along optimum working conditions (pH, temperature, pressure). 3) Modeling: Materials, catalysts and processes will be modeled with computational methods as a pivotal tool to understand and to bring photo-catalytic-electrodes to their theoretical limits in terms of performance. The selected optimum materials and environmental conditions as defined from these parallel studies will be integrated into a PEC cell prototype. This design will include ion exchange membranes and gas diffusion electrodes for product separation. Performance will be validated in real working conditions under sun irradiation to assess the technological and industrial relevance of our A-LEAF cell.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-02-2015 | Award Amount: 6.14M | Year: 2016

Within the project SURE (Novel Productivity Enhancement Concept for a Sustainable Utilization of a Geothermal Resource) the radial water jet drilling (RJD) technology will be investigated and tested as a method to increase inflow into insufficiently producing geothermal wells. Radial water jet drilling uses the power of a focused jet of fluids, applied to a rock through a coil inserted in an existing well. This technology is likely to provide much better control of the enhanced flow paths around a geothermal well and does not involve the amount of fluid as conventional hydraulic fracturing, reducing the risk of induced seismicity considerably. RJD shall be applied to access and connect high permeable zones within geothermal reservoirs to the main well with a higher degree of control compared to conventional stimulation technologies. A characterization of the parameters controlling the jet-ability of different rock formations, however, has not been performed for the equipment applied so far. SURE will investigate the technology for deep geothermal reservoir rocks at different geological settings such as deep sedimentary basins or magmatic regions at the micro-, meso- and macro-scale. Laboratory tests will include the determination of parameters such as elastic constants, permeability and cohesion of the rocks as well as jetting experiments into large samples in. Samples will be investigated in 3D with micro CT scanners and with standard microscopy approaches. In addition, advanced modelling will help understand the actual mechanism leading to the rock destruction at the tip of the water jet. Last but not least, experimental and modelling results will be validated by controlled experiments in a quarry (mesoscale) which allows precise monitoring of the process, and in two different geothermal wells. The consortium includes the only company in Europe offering the radial drilling service.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: SCC-01-2015 | Award Amount: 28.05M | Year: 2016

Sharing Cities has four key objectives. 1) To achieve scale in the European smart cities market by proving that properly designed smart city solutions, based around common needs, can be integrated in complex urban environments. This will be done in a way that exhibits their true potential and allows for the significant scale-up and consequent increase in social, economic and environmental value. 2) Adopt a digital first approach which proves the extent to which ICT integration can improve and connect up existing infrastructure, as well as the design and running of new city infrastructure. This will also allow for the creation of a new set of next stage digital services which will help citizens make better and beneficial choices around energy efficiency and mobility, which when scaled up will enhance the citys ability to hit key targets for mobility, housing, energy efficiency and resilience, and economic development. 3) Accelerate the market to understand, develop and trial business, investment and governance models, essential for the true aggregation and replication (through collaboration) of smart city solutions in cities of different sizes and maturities. In doing this, we intend to accelerate the pace by which we make transformative improvements, and enhance sustainability in communities. 4) Share and collaborate for society: to respond to increasing demand for participation; to enhance mechanisms for citizens engagement; to improve local governments capacity for policy making and service delivery through collaboration and co-design; resulting in outcomes that are better for citizens, businesses and visitors. These will be delivered by a range of expert partners across 8 work packages.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 2.81M | Year: 2013

Modern structural biology builds upon synergies between lab-bench scale science on the one hand and large scale research infrastructure on the other. NanoMem recognises the transformative opportunities that are created by current X-ray source and detector developments to impact strongly on membrane protein structure, a challenging sub-field of structural biology. We will exploit synchrotron based micro-focus X-ray beams to address challenging diffraction studies from small membrane protein crystals; and embrace the revolutionary possibilities created by X-ray Free Electron Lasers to deliver an entirely new regime of high-resolution serial femtosecond crystallography of membrane proteins. These developments will place heavy demands on motivated and highly-trained talent. The time is ripe for bringing young scientists into the loop. Nanomem will train the nucleus of a new community spread across Europe that widens the access and use of non-conventional methods to capture membrane protein structures at high resolution. Our interdisciplinary and intersectorial research training work programme incorporates membrane protein production, purification and crystallisation, micro and nano-crystal manipulation, micro-focus diffraction at synchrotron sources, nano-focus diffraction at X-ray free electron lasers, serial femtosecond crystallography, software development, drug design, and commercialisation of the most helpful innovations. On-site scientific training of nine ESRs and one ER with seamless industrial participation will be complemented with training in areas such as intellectual property, communication skills and scientific mentoring. The current major European effort in the construction of new brilliant X-ray sources has to be matched by an investment in nurturing the birth of a scientific community for its exploitation, pushing the limits of our understanding of membrane protein structural biology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.4-3 | Award Amount: 6.53M | Year: 2014

Coastal floods are one of the most dangerous and harmful natural hazards affecting urban areas adjacent to shorelines. Rapid urbanisation combined with climate change and poor governance means a significant increase in the risk of local surface flooding coinciding with high water levels in rivers and high tide or storm surges from the sea, posing a greater risk of devastation to coastal communities. The threats posed need to be addressed not just in terms of flood prediction and control, but taking into account governance and socio-economic issues. PEARL brings together world leading expertise in both the domain of hydro-engineering and risk reduction and management services to pool knowledge and practical experience in order to develop more sustainable risk management solutions for coastal communities focusing on present and projected extreme hydro-meteorological events. The project will examine 7 case studies from across the EU to develop a holistic risk reduction framework that can identify multi-stressor risk assessment, risk cascading processes and strengthen risk governance by enabling an active role for key actors. The research programme links risk and root cause assessment through enhanced FORIN methodology, event prediction, forecast and warning, development of adaptive structural and non-structural strategies and active stakeholder participation. The project aims to develop novel technologies and methods that can improve the early warning process and its components; it builds a pan-European knowledge base gathering real case studies and demonstrations of best practice across the EU to support capacity development for the delivery of cost-effective risk-reduction plans. Additionally, the project provides an interface to relevant ongoing tsunami work: it plugs into global databases, early warning systems and processes at WMO, and contributes to community building, development of guidelines and communication avenues at the global level through IWA.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.65M | Year: 2014

SNAL is a multidisciplinary programme specially designed to provide scientific and transferable skill training and career development for early stage researchers and experienced researchers in membrane research. Working in a multidisciplinary network will give the researchers a broad perspective on their research field as well as the basic ability of pursuing a research project from basic sciences to industrial applications. The broad aim is to train a new cohort of researchers with systemic thinking equipped with generic skills in combining experimental studies and computer simulations to prepare them for fruitful careers in academia and industry. One challenge for the project is the design and synthesis of novel biomaterials able to modify membrane properties. This requires deep understanding of the interactions of lipid membranes with nano-objects including functional biomimetic polymers, polymeric micelles, carbon nanotubes and polymer therapeutic complexes/conjugates to enable the intelligent design of novel materials with improved bilayer modifying properties. To achieve this goal we have assembled a highly interdisciplinary team of leading groups all having synergies in their established research interests in the field of lipid bilayer nano-objects interactions. The project combines computer simulations, chemical synthesis, clinical and industrial expertise, physical and biological experiments. The industry involvement in the project is very high with full participation of Unilever and Biopharma, the companies from different sectors. Complementarity of partner skills provides a logical basis for a collective training programme. The full cycle of the design process, from theoretical models to synthesis and experimental and clinical validation, is of particular importance for training of ESRs and their future career development.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.2.1-5 | Award Amount: 8.54M | Year: 2014

Neuropathic pain has a high incidence in Europe and often affects the patients emotional balance and quality of life. Recent meta-analyses have shown that conventional analgesic drugs are not sufficiently effective in these patients and are limited by serious side effects. The search for new analgesics is extremely difficult despite identification of several new potential targets and enormous investment by the pharmaceutical industry. Important reasons for this failure are the poor predictive validity of currently available animal models of chronic pain, that do not simulate multidimensional clinical pain, and the high inter-individual variability of neuropathic pain manifestations and treatment responses. We will overcome these obstacles by an interdisciplinary collaboration between basic science groups, clinicians and leading private companies. This consortium will validate new animal models to evaluate the electrophysiological, behavioural, emotional and cognitive manifestations of neuropathic pain and the effectiveness of novel compounds. The use of these models in combination with other behavioural paradigms and new conditional knockout mouse lines for specific components of the endogenous opioid and cannabinoid system will permit the identification of novel druggable targets and biomarkers for neuropathic pain. Novel analgesic compounds acting on these endogenous systems developed by the private companies of the consortium will be tested in these new paradigms. Clinical studies will identify novel biomarkers for neuropathic pain using powerful genetics approaches and investigate treatment effectiveness with a translational focus based on cross validation of the findings in animals and humans.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.9.6 | Award Amount: 3.84M | Year: 2013

Despite recent advances in in vivo directed evolution techniques and the interest they have attracted so far, their impact in applied biotechnology is limited because of their limitations in programmability, selective drivers, cost and scalability. Here, we propose to construct a general-purpose programmable evolution machine able to quickly evolve new biomolecules or phenotypes in bacterial cells. The proposed device will use existing phage technology and synthetic regulation to engineer a programmable directed evolution machine able to produce biomolecules or biocomputational functionality two orders of magnitude faster than conventional techniques, while consuming fewer consumables. In its core, living matter will be subject to combinatorial search algorithms that will exploit large numbers of small, separate, bacterial populations. Each one will contain phage that evolve under different custom fitness selections. The different phage will then be recombined according to combinatorial optimization strategies. The software and hardware design of our device is inspired by microprocessor manufacturing practice. Hence, in addition to the genetic devices for phage engineering, mutation, recombination and selection, we will develop: i) fluidic modules for cell and phage growth, ii) their hardware primitives, iii) a custom instruction set architecture, and iv) a high-level language with its compiler. We will demonstrate the operation of our device by engineering site-specific ribonucleases and nucleases with real-world applications, such as anti-HIV activity. We will also develop applications for new type of distributed bacterial computing using phage communication. We will thus put in place the foundations and approaches for this radical living technology that will impact ICT as well as many areas beyond, such as biology, chemistry and manufacturing.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 4.09M | Year: 2015

The ModLife project is a European Training Network initiative that brings together 5 leading European universities, 4 global industrial players and 2 SMEs to undertake research and training in the area of product-process innovation, optimization monitoring and control for life sciences and biotechnology industries. Modlife aims to develop Advanced Model-Based Optimization, Monitoring and Control as Enabling Technologies for bioprocess-product development and innovation tailored for the needs in life science industries. ModLife ETN will address excellence in research and training of next generation biochemical and process engineers in life sciences industries through: (1) Offering comprehensive training and knowledge transfer opportunities in multidisciplinary and multi-sectoral fields for training early stage researchers with multidisciplinary knowledge and competences bridging engineering and life sciences (2) Integrating and creating synergies among individually excellent but otherwise fragmented bioprocess engineering research centers across the European union in life sciences and biotechnology industries, (3) Building on advances in modeling and simulation, to develop cutting edge model-based enabling technologies and applications for optimization, monitoring and control for bioprocess and product development and innovation. The ModLife ETN aims at next generation of high performance computing tools and in-situ measurements for increasing efficiency, innovation and competitiveness of Europes life sciences and processing industries. Ultimately Modlife aims to help Europe realize the promising potential of life sciences and biotechnology- considered the next frontier technologies with profound impacts to knowledge based economy, by building the capacity to translate lab-scale life science discoveries to large scale new products and processes to match the human needs for health, nutrition and wellbeing.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.37M | Year: 2013

In spite of its challenging properties, the utilization of graphene for technical applications still demands considerable efforts in developing dedicated processing methods, which have a potential to be adapted and finally utilized for industrial scale device manufacturing. Among the processes which have been investigated so far, chemical vapour deposition of graphene on copper, where copper acts as a catalyst to facilitate the growth of single layered graphene - appears to be one the most promising approaches. Although extensively studied, there are issues with this process related to quality, reproducibility and yield, which are connected to the lack of control of the interface between copper and graphene. Within the process, which we will be able to tackle these issues in a more controllable way by a combined in-situ deposition system, where copper and other possible metals are deposited within one vacuum system together with the graphene CVD, i.e without exposing the sample to an ambient environment. Like for 2D Ga-Al-As semiconductor heterostructures, the control of the interfaces on an atomic length scale by means of an in-situ multilayer deposition process is expected to be the pathway which will enable the ultilization of graphenes unqiue properties within manufacturable device structures. In spite of this potential, we feel the full integration of graphene into CMOS technology, although being extremely challenging on the long term - still has a very long way to go and may even be impossible without fundamentally different processing approaches. However, sensor technologies as a whole are mostly based on hybrid solutions, where the sensor itself - even chip based in some cases - is still separated from the CMOS digital electronic by flip chip, wire bonding or simple by conventional wiring. A widely used example of high indutrial impact are piezoelectric sensors, where the high processing temperature of the lead-zirconium-titanate ceramics are incompatible with CMOS processing conditions. Based on this philosophy, we believe that the in-situ growing approach for metal-graphene multilayers, as envisaged to be developed within this project, will enable a significant improvement of existing sensor concepts and the realization and manufacturing of new sensor concepts. Based on the expertise of our scientific partners within Imperial College and NPL and our associated partners from industry, we will focus on biosensor applications, where graphene - as carbon based material - is particularly challenging as bio-interface. As - from the point of view of process technology -the most simple approach, graphene coated copper electrodes will have a potential for radiofrequency - microwave - terahertz biosensor, where copper will outperform gold due to lower conduction losses and graphene provides the interface to the biomolecules and cells. As a second step on a scale of increasing complexity of process technology, we believe that a sacrificial layer process for arbitrary shaped free standing graphene membranes and (sub)micro scale flexural beam is a realistic development goal. This technology will enable the development of arrays of nanomechanical sensors, based on the exceptional mechanical properties of graphene. Apart from sensor applications, graphene- based NEMS structures are challenging objects for the refinement and exploration of metrology for nanotechnology and biology, as being pursued by our collaborators from NPL. The recently discovered confined plasmon-polariton excitations - originating from the unique electronic properties of graphene - are currently one of the hottest topic within the graphene research community. We believe, that the tailored free standing structures we will be able to manufacture with this deposition kit, will pave the way to explore and finally utilize this unique optical - infrared properties of graphene for novel sensor applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: GC.SST.2012.1-7. | Award Amount: 14.25M | Year: 2013

Eight of Europes largest cities, will demonstrate that electric vehicles operating last mile freight movements in urban centres can offer significant and achievable decarbonisation of the European transport system. Demonstrators will be deployed in Amsterdam, Lisbon, London, Madrid, Milan, Oslo, Rotterdam and Stockholm. The demonstrators have been designed to ensure FREVUE covers the breadth of urban freight applications which occur across Europe. By exposing 127 electric vehicles to the day to day rigours of the urban logistics environment, the project will prove that the current generation of large electric vans and trucks can offer a viable alternative to diesel vehicles - particularly when combined with state of the art urban logistics applications, innovative logistics management software, and with well designed local policy. The project will demonstrate solutions to the barriers currently inhibiting uptake of EVs in the sector and includes leading European researchers who will design and then implement a common pan-European assessment framework to understand the impacts of these solutions. This will ensure that the project creates a valuable European evidence base on the role of EVs in urban logistics. Partners will produce a detailed White Paper on the feasibility of EV rollout in logistics across Europe, with chapters containing best practice advice on EV in logistics for: policy makers, logistics operators, their customers and companies developing technology to support the sector. The final overarching objective is to encourage the exploitation of these best practice results through a targeted dissemination campaign aimed at decision makers in the logistics industry. To complement this, FREVUE will also create a network of Phase 2 cities to directly share the lessons learned from the demonstrators. These cities are expected to be the first cities to expand the successful concepts developed by FR-EVUE.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-SyG | Phase: ERC-2013-SyG | Award Amount: 9.65M | Year: 2014

Organic semiconductors are enabling flexible, large-area optoelectronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes, transistors, and solar cells. Due to their exceptionally long spin lifetimes, these carbon-based materials could also have an important impact on spintronics, where carrier spins, rather than charges, play a key role in transmitting, processing and storing information. However, to exploit this potential, a method for direct conversion of spin information into an electric signal is indispensable. Spin-charge conversion in inorganic semiconductors and metals has mainly relied on the spin-orbit interaction, a fundamental relativistic effect which couples the motion of electrons to their spins. The spin-orbit interaction causes a flow of spins, a spin current, to induce an electric field perpendicular to both the spin polarization and the flow direction of the spin current. This is called the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). We have very recently been able to observe for the first time the inverse spin-Hall effect in an organic conductor. This breakthrough raises important questions for our understanding of spin-charge conversion in materials with intrinsically weak spin-orbit coupling. It also expands dramatically the range of materials and structures available to address some currently not well understood scientific questions in spintronics and opens opportunities for realising novel spintronic devices for spin-based information processing and spin caloritronic energy harvesting that make use of unique properties of hybrid, organic-inorganic structures. The main objective of the proposed research is to take spintronics to a level that inorganic spintronics cannot reach on its own. The project is based on new theoretical and experimental methodologies arising at the interface between two currently disjoint scientific communities, organic semiconductors and inorganic spintronics, and aims to exploit synergies between chemistry, physics and theory.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: SPIRE-03-2014 | Award Amount: 13.65M | Year: 2015

The use of renewable resources in the process industries is socially desirable and a market pull for products has started to develop in recent years, but renewable products have to compete with identical or similar-in-application products based on fossil raw materials in terms of quality and production cost. One of the main reasons for currently higher production costs of products based on renewable resources is that the production routes involve processing complex dilute aqueous solutions from which the desired products have to be separated during downstream processing. Consequently, a major challenge the process industry is facing, is the development of cost- and energy-efficient water removal and product-recovery techniques. Today downstream processes for products based on renewable resources are often developed using methods from the petrochemical area being insufficiently adapted to the new applications. A re-thinking of downstream process development and the development of suitable methodologies for a fast-track development of tailored downstream processes as well as the optimisation of separation technologies are urgently needed in order to unlock the potential of the renewable-based product market for the European process industry. PRODIAS addresses this challenge by developing and implementing: - a toolbox of highly innovative, cost-effective and renewable-tailored separation technologies; single technologies and/or hybrid systems - novel, optimized apparatus and machinery to enable for and host the developed technologies - in combination with an integrated design approach for the fast-track selection of appropriate technologies. The main advantages of the PRODIAS toolbox and integrated design approach for processes based on renewable resources are - significantly decreased production cost - increased productivity and efficiency - faster process development and commercialization - significantly lower energy consumption leading to less CO2 emmissions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-01-2014 | Award Amount: 7.26M | Year: 2015

The dramatic differentials in healthy ageing, quality of life and life expectancy between individuals of different socioeconomic groups, is a major societal challenge facing Europe. The overarching aim of the LIFEPATH project is to understand the determinants of diverging ageing pathways among individuals belonging to different socio-economic groups. This will be achieved via an original study design that integrates social science approaches with biology (including molecular epidemiology), using existing population cohorts and omics measurements (particularly epigenomics). The specific objectives of the project are: (a) To show that healthy ageing is an achievable goal for society, as it is already experienced by individuals of high socio-economic status (SES); (b) To improve the understanding of the mechanisms through which healthy ageing pathways diverge by SES, by investigating lifecourse biological pathways using omic technologies; (c) To examine the consequences of the current economic recession on health and the biology of ageing (and the consequent increase in social inequalities); (d) To provide updated, relevant and innovative evidence for healthy ageing policies (particularly health in all policies) that address social disparities in ageing and the social determinants of health, using both observational studies as well as an experimental approach based on the existing conditional cash transfer experiment in New York. To achieve these objectives we will use data from three categories of studies: 1. Europe-wide or national surveys combined with population registry data; 2. Cohorts with intense phenotyping and repeat biological samples (total population >33,000); 3. Large cohorts with biological samples (total population >202,000). The cohorts will provide information on healthy ageing at different stages of life, based on the concepts of life-course epidemiology (build-up and decline) and multimorbidity.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 1.26M | Year: 2013

The Revolutionary Electric Vehicle Battery (REVB) project aims to develop a revolutionary Lithium Sulfur (Li-S) vehicle battery and Battery Energy Management (BEM) system which will provide breakthrough improvements in energy density, cost, range and safety of electric vehicle batteries and put the UK in a world leading position to exploit this. The project intends to double the rate of improvement of the OXIS Li-S battery, by developing and embedding a model led R&D culture within OXIS, using a deep understanding of the underlying science which will be developed with Imperial College to inform product development. It is a proven approach within other sectors (such as crash testing) within the automotive industry, but rarely adopted by battery developers. The project will also develop a battery energy manager, working with Lotus and Cranfield, in order to be able to push the chemistry to its limits and achieve 400Wh/kg cell energy density with practical cycle life and performance metrics. The output of the project will offer a battery system for automotive applications that can not only store more energy than today’s technology but can also harness significantly more of that energy, resulting in a compound improvement for next generation Electric Vehicles.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2013.2.2-4 | Award Amount: 5.13M | Year: 2013

MATFLEXEND investigates new materials which enable capacitive-mechanical energy harvesters with significantly improved power density and efficiency. Such materials will be durable, solution-processible, flexible, and therefore enable mass-production techniques including printing. The REWOD principle (Reverse-Electrowetting-On-Dielectric) will be developed for small-scale energy scavenging, and a completely new variant of variable capacitor electrodes based on electrically conducting elastomers will be investigated which will lead to lightweight, low-maintenance, low cost electrical generators. High-k nano-doped polymer dielectrics will be developed with high breakdown voltage and low leakage. A new secondary battery architecture will be used, involving a novel polyHIPE / electrolyte element including RTILs, and novel nano-fibre composite electrodes, resulting in reconfigurable secondary lithium ion battery storage elements with higher temperature stability. High surface area 3D electrodes will be developed by EPD (electrophoretical deposition) to achieve the rate capability required in sensor nodes. Synergistically battery and harvester can use the same substrate, current collectors and hermetic encapsulation technology. At the same time these harvester/storage arrays can be structured into parallel and serial networks, to meet a variety of power and storage needs. Low cost harvesters are the key to consumer applications such as wearable electronics and smartcards as well as wireless sensors in a variety of application areas like medical/healthcare, sports and automotive. Demonstrations developed in the project include wearable applications and chip cards.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ISIB-05-2014 | Award Amount: 10.81M | Year: 2015

The COSMOS proposal aims to reduce Europes dependence on imported coconut and palm kernel oils and fatty acids and castor oil as sources for medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA, C10C14) and medium-chain polymer building blocks. These are needed by the oleochemical industry for the production of plastics, surfactants, detergents, lubricants, plasticisers and other products. In COSMOS, camelina and crambe will be turned into profitable, sustainable, multipurpose, non-GMO European oil crops for the production of oleochemicals. Seed properties will be screened and optimised through genetic techniques aiming at high yield, low resource inputs, optimization of the value generated from vegetative tissues and fatty acid profiles adapted to industrial needs. Large-scale field trials will be performed at different locations in Europe to assess the potential of the crops in terms of cultivation practices, seed yield, oil content, ease of harvesting, and resource inputs. Extracted oils will be fractionated into various fatty acid types (monounsaturated versus polyunsaturated) by selective enzyme technologies and extraction processes. The monounsaturated long-chain fatty acids so obtained will be converted to MCFA and high-value building blocks for bio-plastics and flavour and fragrance ingredients through chemical and enzymatic chain cleavage processes. The 3-rich PUFA fraction will be purified for use in food and feed ingredients. Vegetative tissues such as straw, leaves and press cake will be fed to insects producing high-value proteins, chitin and fats. Insect fats and proteins will be isolated and prepared for use in food and feed products. The overall economic, social and environmental sustainability as well as life cycle of the whole value chain will be assessed. The impact of the project for Europe will be assessed in terms of value chain potentials for value creation and number of jobs that can be created.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.16M | Year: 2014

How can we make a movie of atoms - or even electrons - moving inside molecules? This is a fundamental problem in many fields of physics, chemistry and biology. For this, we need pulses of light with a duration which is much shorter than the characteristic times of the movements of the atoms or electrons. For the case of atoms this is typically a few femtoseconds (1fs is one billionth of a nanosecond); electrons move even faster, on the attosecond scale, where (1 attosecond is one thousandth of a femtosecond!). We also need very short wavelengths, such as those of X-rays, so to achieve the necessary resolution at the nanometre scale. Meeting these requirements is a formidable challenge, but the pay-off in terms of applications, ranging to medical science to material engineering, is enormous. Cutting-edge imaging experiments of this type have already been achieved by using X-ray sources in huge facilities. However, their large scale and operating cost prevents them from becoming a widespread tool. There is a more convenient and compact way of producing very short X-ray pulses. If we shine short pulses of visible light on a jet of gas, such as argon, the atoms of the gas respond to the presence of this light by emitting bursts of extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray radiation by a process called high harmonic generation (HHG). The applicability of these pulses for probing electronic dynamics in atoms and molecules has been tested in a series of pioneering experiments. However, the brightness of HHG sources is far from being comparable with that of large-scale facilities. We will investigate the prospects for making HHG a fully viable technique for taking molecular movies with a system small enough for an ordinary R&D laboratory. We have identified solutions for overcoming current limitations: in particular, we will work on choosing the best possible visible light for producing HHG radiation, as well as on employing techniques of phase-matching, i.e. controlling how the light propagates through the jet, to increase the efficiency of generation. HHG beams are akin to an X-ray laser, with which they share properties of coherence. This implies that, if we collect the full information on the amplitude and the phase of the light far from our target, we can use sophisticated computer codes to reconstruct the shape of this object. This avoids using lenses for X-rays, which are difficult to manufacture. Further, by tuning the wavelength of the X-ray beam it is possible to select and image only a specified atomic element in the object. We will demonstrate the utility of the bright HHG beams we plan to develop in proof-of-principle experiments on aluminium alloys. These alloys - which are of crucial importance to the aerospace, automotive, and electronic industries - derive their strength from the formation of inhomogeneities during heat treatment. However, the relation between their microscopic structure and mechanical properties is not well understood; our demonstration experiments may open a new route for exploring these important issues. From a fundamental viewpoint, the electromagnetic field contains the maximum possible information about an object that can be obtained in an optical experiment. Hence we will also investigate methods able fully to characterize the X-ray field scattered from an object, allowing the spatial and structural dynamics of the object to be tracked. In summary, we plan to take major steps towards laboratory-scale imaging at atomic spatial and temporal scales by developing bright, compact pulsed soft-X-ray sources and measurement methods that return the full details of the radiation field incident on, and scattered from, the object under study. This research programme therefore has the potential to deliver a step change in what is possible in spatio-temporal imaging at the nanoscale


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.6.3 | Award Amount: 4.42M | Year: 2014

Growing water demand caused by climate change, urbanization and population growth requires new business and technology platforms to manage the increased level of diversity and complexity of urban water resources management. The increasing variability of both supply and consumption will also require more sophisticated and optimized decision making.\n\nTo achieve a step change in water and energy savings we propose to apply and test an intelligent ICT system for real time abstraction & discharge monitoring. This will create an open, scalable, marketable and user-friendly system to optimise water resource management and replace the current licensing system. An innovative just-in time ability will be applied to create substantial water savings, whilst also enhancing delivery on EU Water Framework Directive obligations. The WISDOM approach will combine different innovative technologies (including smart ICT components and decision support system) to integrate water distribution, real time sensor monitoring and high power computing networks to (a) improve household, business and societal awareness, (b) induce changes in consumer behaviour, (c) enable the introduction of innovative resource and demand management schemes, (d) pave the way to adaptive pricing incentives, and (e) develop and demonstrate widely applicable concepts for energy recovery from water use, enhancing the water-energy nexus.\n\nThe WISDOM project strategy fundamentally relies on a comprehensive R&D and demonstration approach. The proposed integrated concept will be first modelled and simulated for different typologies of buildings and water distribution network, then tested at an intermediate level in a full-scale experimental facility in France (AQUASIM) before being finally installed, monitored and evaluated in two pilot projects (including residential and non residential buildings) in the UK (Cardiff - Wales) and Italy (La Spezia).\n\nThese demonstrators will be used to assess the societal, environmental and economic benefits of the new integrated concept and also to validate models and technologies in order for the concept to be easily replicable throughout all countries and differing European areas. The major resultant impact from WISDOM will be (a) increased user awareness and modified behaviours concerning the use of water, (b) quantifiable and significant reduction of water consumption, (c) peak-period reduction of water and energy distribution loads, (d) improved resource efficiency and business operations of water utilities due to ICT, and (e) contribute to the improvement of the environmental performance of buildings. In addition, WISDOM will promote the development of a complete value chain covering all stakeholders in the water usage cycle including the establishment of strategic partnerships between ICT equipment providers, software companies and water authorities to pave the way to a Europe wide, and beyond, exploitation of the WISDOM technology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.1.2 | Award Amount: 3.17M | Year: 2013

The main objective of the project PANACEA is to provide Proactive Autonomic Management of Cloud Resources as a remedy to the exponentially growing complexity.\nIf you look at the system resources (Internet) at the bottom of the stack, that system resource can be servers, storage, data centres, and network resources, the concept is then to build a level of virtualization of those resources so that any given event is not tied to one box necessarily or to one storage disk. Once you get that kind of leverage, you can build the set of functions that relate to autonomic self-* properties: configuring, healing, optimizing and protecting. The design that you have to have holistically has to deal with the fact that components are going to fail. The aim of a Cloud Computing platform is to support redundant, self-recovering, highly scalable programming models that allow workloads to recover from many inevitable hardware/software failures and monitoring resource use in real time for providing physical and virtual servers, on which the applications can run.\nIt will propose innovative solutions for autonomic management of cloud resources, which will be based on a set of advanced Machine Learning Techniques and virtualization. A Machine Learning (ML) framework will be created for a proactive autonomic management of cloud resources. It will allow predicting the failure time of software, or user applications running on Virtual Machines (VM) and the violation of expected response time of services.\nTo deal with the vast number of possible resources to monitor, our main approach will consider the use of mobile agents, which will move on the cloud, interacting with other agents, reading computing and network sensors, and making autonomous decisions on what to measure, when to report and to whom. Distributed Machine Learning, based on Reinforcement Learning and Neural Networks, will be used to enforce self-organizing paths.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: NMP.2013.4.0-3 | Award Amount: 5.97M | Year: 2013

Environmental wellbeing backed by increasingly severe legislation dictates that pollution and energy consumption by automobiles must be reduced significantly. The outcomes of this project will enable both these imperatives to be achieved simultaneously. The project aim is to establish production lines in Europe that manufacture components for lightweight complex-shaped automobile body structures that are significantly lighter and of comparable strength and stiffness to those currently available. This will be achieved by exploiting a new patented thermo-mechanical processing technology (HFQ) for sheet aluminium alloy that enables, for the first time, parts in heat treatable alloys to be produced to net-shape with maximum attainable mechanical properties. The life-cycle energy consumption of automobiles will be reduced; in the production stage, by the low energy requirements of HFQ, which is enhanced by the potential use of low cost recycled raw material and in the driving stage, by the reduced fuel consumption associated with lightweight vehicles. Reduced pollution is a natural corollary of low energy consumption. Exploitation of this groundbreaking technology will be achieved through refinement of its laboratory scale development by university, research institution and manufacturing SME collaboration, leading to production lines being established in Tier 1 companies. Two such lines are anticipated as an outcome of the project. In 8 year period, over 30 production lines will be established in Europe and over 1000 jobs could be created. It is expected that new Al-alloy body and chassis structures will be produced in a mass-production scale, with weight saving of over 40% for the Classes C&D and above segment vehicles (which are currently made of steel). Thus, 60% of cars could be made with Al-body and chassis structures, and the resultant fuel saving in car usage would be up to 23% on average.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.5.1.2 | Award Amount: 8.19M | Year: 2013

Major sources for human made CO2 emissions comprise the energy and the industrial sector including cement production. One of the most appropriate concepts to capture CO2 from such point sources is the oxyfuel combustion. The main energy demand for this method results from the O2 generation, which is usually done by air liquefaction. This energy demand can substantially be lowered using thermally integrated separation modules based on ceramic oxygen transport membranes (OTM). It is least if the OTM is integrated in a 4-end mode, which entails that the permeating oxygen is swept and directly diluted using recirculated flue gas. Up to 60% reduction in capture energy demand compared to cryogenic air separation and up to 40% reduction compared to post-combustion capture approaches can be achieved. GREEN-CC will provide a new generation high-efficiency capture process based on oxyfuel combustion. The focus lies on the development of clear integration approaches for OTM-modules in power plants and cement industry considering minimum energy penalty related to common CO2 capture and integration in existing plants with minimum capital investment. This will be attained by using advanced process simulations and cost calculations. GREEN-CC will also explore the use of OTM-based oxyfuel combustion in different highly energy-demanding industrial processes, e.g. oil refining and petrochemical industry. However, highly permeable membrane materials show a chemical instability against CO2 and other flue gas components. One major challenge faced by GREEN-CC is therefore to identify and develop membrane materials, components, and a PoC-module for the 4-end mode OTM integration. The desired membrane assembly will consist of a thin membrane layer supported on substrates with engineered porosity and oxygen reduction catalysts with high and stable activity in flue gas. As proof of concept, a planar membrane module will be developed which involves technical hurdles like joining technology


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 390.06K | Year: 2015

Ionotronic devices rely on charge effects based on ions instead of/or in addition to electrons. The field has begun to gain very wide attention recently. It has been applied mainly to oxide thin film memristors (resistance depends on voltage and can be switched between an on and an off state of high and low resistance). These devices are interesting for creating electrically switchable memory, but there are challenges with these structures including the requirement of a setting process and variable properties from one film to another. In this proposal, we have the new idea to utilise ionotronic effects to create a new kind of electrically switchable memory. Here ionic defects at vertical interfaces in vertical nanocomposite thin films charge couple to magnetism in a magnetic transition metal oxide. Since the cation valences in the metal oxide depend on oxygen concentration or charge state, and since the magnetic properties depend on cation valences, it should be possible to switch magnetism on and off by applying an electric field. This device is an ionotronic magnetoelectric, and it represents a completely new form of magnetoelectric RAM. Magnetoelectric RAM is where electric field controls magnetism instead of electric current doing so as in other forms of RAM, and it is a long sought-after goal. It offers the possibility of low power, very high density, high-speed reading and writing times, and non-volatility. Low energy, high performance computing is promised with this technology. However, while a range of structures and materials have been studied to date, none has proved practical in terms of ease of structure formation, stability, temperature of operation, or size of magnetoelectric effect. Making the ionotronic magnetoelectric a practical reality is not trivial, and relies on advanced materials science - the growth of very thin films, the creation of highly ordered materials combinations on a very small scale (1/0000 the thickness of a human hair), the movement of charges along interface nanochannels near to room temperature, the knowledge of which materials combine together in a compatible way, the imaging of materials at the atomic scale, etc. To attain the practical magnetoelectric dream we propose to create and measure new structures, we will use unique experimental capabilities and will also collaborate with world-leading researchers. Our starting point for the research is our ability to create, at the nanometre scale, ionic interface channels in perfect vertical nanocomposite films. We have also observed the first signs that ions can indeed charge couple to magnetic properties.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-09-2015 | Award Amount: 24.09M | Year: 2015

HIV-1 is responsible for a global pandemic of 35 million people, and continues to spread at a rate of >2 million new infections/year. It is widely acknowledged that a protective vaccine would be the most effective means to reduce HIV-1 spread and ultimately eliminate the pandemic, while a therapeutic vaccine may help mitigate the clinical course of disease and lead to strategies of viral eradication. However despite 30 years of research, we do not have a vaccine capable of protecting from HIV-1 infection or impacting on disease progression. This in part represents the challenge of identifying immunogens and vaccine modalities with reduced risk of failure in late stage development. To overcome this bottleneck some of the most competitive research groups in vaccine discovery from European public institutions and biotechs from 9 EU countries together with top Australian and Canadian groups and US collaborators, have agreed to join forces in EAVI, providing a pool of international expertise at the highest level. EAVI2020 will provide a platform for the discovery and selection of several new, diverse and novel preventive and/or therapeutic vaccine candidates for HIV/AIDS. Emphasis will be placed on early rapid, iterative, small Experimental medicine (EM) human vaccine studies to select and refine the best immunogens, adjuvants, vectors, homologous and heterologous primeboost schedules, and determine the impact of host factors such as gender and genetics. Animal models will be used to complement human studies, and to select novel immunization technologies to be advanced to the clinic. To shift the risk curve in product development we will develop innovative risk prediction methods, specifically designed to reduce the risk associated with late stage preventive or therapeutic vaccine failure, increasing the chance of discovery of an effective vaccine.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-SG | Phase: ERC-SG-LS8 | Award Amount: 1.40M | Year: 2013

Jawed vertebrates account for more than 99% of modern vertebrate diversity. Collectively, they comprise chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, and chimaeras) and osteichthyans (bony fishes and terrestrial vertebrates, including humans). The anatomy of jawed vertebrates includes a series of complex traits such as jaws, teeth, paired appendages, and novel skeletal tissues such as bone. In spite of the intensive investigation of jawed vertebrate evolution in comparative morphology and molecular developmental evolution, the origin and early diversification of this important group remains mysterious. This project seeks to inject a large body of fresh data into the problem of early jawed vertebrate origins and evolution and develop modernized tools for morphological phylogenetics. We will use an integration of expeditionary fieldwork, modern digital imaging technology, and newly developed numerical methods in phylogenetics to address the problems of early jawed vertebrate origins. The work will focus on the morphology and relationships of fossil jawed vertebrates from the Palaeozoic Era (approx. 540-250 million years ago) which exhibit the earliest evidence of jaws, teeth, and paired appendages. Fieldwork in Mongolia will deliver new taxonomic and morphological data from poorly explored regions and attack a major geographic bias in existing fossil archives. The project will exploit computed tomography scanning to analyze existing fossil archives of extract species. This work will provide a detailed scheme of phylogenetic relationships inferring the relationships of early fossil forms to modern jawed vertebrate lineages and document the evolutionary assembly of complex morphological traits of jawed vertebrates. These results will yield refined timelines for jawed vertebrate evolution that can help calibrate molecular clock studies and deliver a rich comparative framework for evolutionary morphological and developmental studies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.2.1 | Award Amount: 4.31M | Year: 2013

Recent efforts in robotics and automation research have fostered the development of a wide variety of bio-inspired snake-like continuum robots. These robots require radically different controllers and control schemes compared to conventional rigid robots, but continuum control has not received significant attention in the scientific community. Robotic catheters are a particularly challenging specialization of continuum robots because the vascular tree surrounding the catheter is complex, delicate, deformable and highly dynamic. This challenge is further complicated by the limited visibility during the procedure. CASCADE will develop a unified control framework for continuum robots that can operate in complex and deformable environments and specifically in the cardiovascular system. The project will construct general mathematical descriptions of the continuum robot and its surroundings while model parameters will be identified during clinical operation. In cases where fusing pre-operative data with intra-operative sensors does not provide sufficient information to allow reliable decision-making, active sensing techniques will be adopted. An interface to the supervising surgeon will enable cognitive links between the operator and the continuum robot, facilitating complementary assistance during autonomous execution of surgical tasks. The interface will also be used for learning and robotic training and further for validation of techniques using identified clinical benchmarks. The resulting development will allow the control of local (interaction force / stiffness) and global (shape) robot states at an unprecedented level of detail. The developed skill analysis tools will be used to verify the achievable control performance of continuum robots in catheter procedures. In particular, CASCADE will advance the treatment of cardiovascular diseases by providing a new dexterous and intelligent instrument that is initially focused on endovascular aortic valve replacement.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.65M | Year: 2015

Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is emerging as a common feature in the pathology of numerous diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, metabolic syndromes and inflammatory diseases. Thus ER stress represents a potential therapeutic intervention point to be exploited to develop novel therapies, diagnostic tools and markers for these diseases. However, exploitation is hampered by the shortage of scientists with interdisciplinary training that can navigate with ease between the academic, industrial and clinical sectors, and that have the scientific and complementary skills, together with an innovative outlook, to convert research findings into commercial and clinical applications. This proposal will bring young researchers together with world-leading academics, clinicians and industry personnel, who are united in (1) their goal of forming a network of excellence aimed at understanding the ER stress response mechanistically and quantitatively and (2) applying this understanding to identify and validate the most suitable intervention points in order to provide innovative knowledge-driven strategies for the treatment of ER stress-associated diseases. The TRAIN-ERS network will provide early stage researchers (ESRs) with high quality scientific and complementary skills training combined with international, intersectoral work experience. This will produce highly trained, innovative, creative and entrepreneurial ESRs with greatly enhanced career prospects, who will continue to advance the state of the art in the Biomedical field in their further careers, and will confidently navigate at the interface of academic, clinical and private sector research. The TRAIN-ERS research programme will provide the ESRs with the knowledge and the cutting edge scientific and technical skills that will drive our understanding and exploitation of the ER stress response for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-21-2014 | Award Amount: 3.36M | Year: 2015

3D-Tune-In brings together relevant stakeholders: the SME digital games industry (Reactify, Vianet, XTeam and Nerlaska); academic institutes (De Montfort University, University of Nottingham, University of Malaga); a large European hearing aid manufacturer (GN); and hearing communities (Associations - Extra Care, Hearing Link, Action Deafness, Accesibilidad y Personas Sordas and Ente Nazionale Sordi); to produce digital games applied to hearing aids, addressing social inclusion, generating new markets and creating job opportunities. With Europes ageing population the demand for assistive hearing devices is likely to rapidly increase. While the technology has dramatically advanced in the last 25 years since the commercialization of the first digital hearing aid, the new functions are often unexploited or inaccessible, particularly for children and older adults. Producers of hearing aid devices find that individuals prefer to use simpler less flexible devices even though functionality offered by miniaturised digital devices can considerably improve hearing in different acoustic environments (e.g. classroom, office, restaurant, street) leading to greater confidence, improved social interaction and more significantly inclusion back into society. 3D-Tune-In aims to exploit existing, overlooked or neglected hearing aid functionalities to greatly improve peoples quality of life and their interactions with other people and their surrounding environment. This will be achieved through creating the novel 3D-Tune-In toolkit based on participatory design methods and advances in 3D visual, audio and haptic technologies; to enable SMEs in digital games to generate a set of non-leisure game applications employing gamification techniques for supporting hearing impairment. The technology transfer between these scientific, technological and industrial communities will enable the game industry to expand into assistive technologies and support active ageing and healthy living.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-31-2014 | Award Amount: 2.65M | Year: 2015

FRESHER brings together ten research groups, including leaders in the management of large European Foresight projects and highly experienced health policy modelers, in an interdisciplinary team engaged in FoResight and Modelling for European Health policy and Regulation. The overall project objective is the representation of alternative futures where the detection of emerging health scenarios will be used to test future policies to effectively tackle the burden of non communicable diseases (NCDs). The project will produce quantitative estimates of the future global burden of NCDs in the EU and its impact on health care expenditures and delivery, population well-being, health and socio-economic inequalities, and potential changes in these impacts according to alternative health and non-health policy options. The added value of FRESHER lies in the fact that these estimates: - will not only be based on extrapolation of past health trends but also on foresight techniques (mapping of risk factors, horizon scanning and identification of key drivers for change, scenarios building) giving credit to the interdependencies of structural long-term trends in demography, gender relations, technological, economic, environmental, and societal factors at 2050. - will be produced through the development of an empirically-based micro-simulation model (starting from the Chronic Disease Policy Model of OECD), allowing to quantify the current and future health and economic impacts of NCDs and testing what if policy options according to alternative foresight scenarios, as well as potential new policies and policy combinations. FRESHER heavily relies on an interactive process with key stakeholders, at all stages of the project, in elaborating the framework, and giving inputs for the qualitative foresight scenarios and the quantitative micro-simulation model, and in deriving recommendations for future policies affecting population health and well-being.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.95M | Year: 2015

The recent explosion of next generation sequencing (NGS) data has caught Europe unprepared and led to a critical shortage of computational biology expertise. As NGS methods are expected to become pervasive from basic science to personalised medicine there is an urgent need for highly skilled young scientists trained in both computational biology and experimental wet lab biology. Our network addresses this important problem of the postgenomic era. We aim to provide multi-disciplinary skills for a solid foundation in computational biology and developmental genomics. Developmental genomics is central to understanding of ontogeny and many genetic and congenital anomalies, but was outside the scope of the landmark ENCODE and FANTOM projects. ENCODE highlighted the need for an in vivo vertebrate model that enables high throughput in vivo functional testing of hypotheses generated from genome scale annotation. Zebrafish is an ideal model for extending the scope of genomics to vertebrate development. We aim to comprehensively annotate functional elements, decipher genomic codes of transcription, as well as coding and non-coding gene function during development and enhance zebrafish as an attractive developmental, comparative and disease model. The participants include 7 non-academic members (2 of which are beneficiaries), major zebrafish genomics laboratories, eminent computational biologists and world class genomics technology experts active in FANTOM and ENCODE. The training program involves 15 ESRs, more than 40 intersectoral and interdisciplinary secondments totalling 19 months, 7 training courses and 2 workshops/conferences. The main outcome of this programme is a cohort of researchers with computational, experimental laboratory and transferable skills ready to further their career in academia, public health and the private sector.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETOPEN-1-2014 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2015

Diagnostic tests are essential to provide a targeted treatment of infectious diseases and to contain the further spread of multidrug resistant pathogens. Current methods are based either on cultivation or on PCR and have significant limitations concerning the clinical requirements to characterise pathogens including their resistance mechanisms within 3 hours. In MARA, we will develop and combine three radically novel technologies that will lead to substantial breakthroughs in science, medicine and industry and, as proof-of principle, use them to create a DNA-based molecular toolkit characterising pathogens. First, the detection of pathogen-associated antigens will be performed by Autonomous Detection Nucleic Acids (AUDENA) that are independent of any laboratory instruments and sophisticated processing. The realisation of the AUDENA concept will lead to an autonomous, stable, simple and very economic novel sensor class applicable for any water-soluble substances. The second revolutionary technology in MARA employs a novel approach in protein mimicry and creation of artificial enzymes, which represents a breakthrough in several disciplines, such as biotechnology, biomedical manufacturing and the energy sector. The third breakthrough in this project represents the development of a Molecular Robot (MORO) that can specifically identify target cells and destroy them. In MARA, the MORO will be used for the lysis of bacterial cells to release intracellular antibiotic resistance associated antigens, but the long-term vision anticipates an application as antibiotic replacement for infectious diseases and a therapeutic agent for cancer treatment, which would represent one of the most important breakthroughs in medicine in the recent years. To meet the highly ambitious objectives pointed out in this proposal, MARA is driven by a complementary, multidisciplinary team of leading experts, with a young, high-profile scientist in the lead.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: COMPET-03-2015 | Award Amount: 999.95K | Year: 2015

For space missions, the energy density of batteries is a key factor of systems mass. A recent battery technology, based on this Lithium-Sulfur chemistry and developed by OXIS Energy, has shown promising results, particularly in terms of specific energy and cycling performances. Lithium-Sulfur batteries could become the next breakthrough technology for space batteries, with a factor of two on the specific energy compared to the current Lithium-Ion products. ECLIPSE ambition is to channel the research activities in Europe and, as a spinning-in effort, ensure that the harsh space constraints are taken into account for the further improvements of the Li-S technology. This research action aimed at developing Li-S technology for space applications focusing on three levels: - Cell level studies, including research to optimise the four main cells components: anode, cathode, separator and electrolyte to achieve 400Wh/kg cells compatible with space cycling profiles. - Battery and encapsulation level, including prototyping and theoretical studies. - System level studies for integration in satellite and launcher architectures, taking into account the economic constraints and the future technical challenges. The expected outcomes of ECLIPSE are: - Mass reduction of batteries by a factor two. - Costs reduction at all levels: subsystem, system and launching costs. - Maturation of the technology (TRL 5 expected at the end of the project). The main impacts of this research are related to competitiveness (lighter is cheaper), non-dependency and innovation: beyond current markets, this breakthrough can enable new challenging missions. The impact of the project is secured by the composition of the consortium led by Airbus Defence and Space with the main European actors of the Lithium-Sulfur electrochemistry and space batteries: ECLIPSE will contribute to the consolidation of an independent European industrial supply chain for Lithium-Sulfur batteries. Project duration is 24 months.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMBP-08-2016 | Award Amount: 8.00M | Year: 2016

The overall aim of LoCoMaTech is, in the first place, to enable the novel HFQ process, (patented by ICL) in its latest most advanced form, which includes 10 recently patented refining technologies (TRL4), to be used for the manufacture of lightweight, high strength body and chassis structures and components for low-cost vehicles, by establishing a prototype, full scale pilot production line (TRL6), supported by a supply chain ranging from raw material to end of life. This will be the first low-cost technology in the world enabling manufacture of high-strength lightweight complex-shaped aluminium parts and low environmental impact. The 1st generation of HFQ technology has already been commercially used in manufacturing 4 types of niche vehicles. This project aims at bringing the materials and manufacturing cost significantly down, through introducing newly patented technological measures, by which the technology could be used for producing low-cost vehicles. The low-cost HFQ technology will be used first for mass production of aluminium car body and chassis structures (eventually for all vehicles), which will lead to substantial improvement in energy efficiency, performance and travel range of low-end vehicles. LoCoMaTech will construct a world first low-cost HFQ aluminium production line (prototype), targeting reduction of energy consumption per vehicle by 15.3-22%, and cost-effective weight savings from 8.55 to 2.16 /kg-saved and improvement of LCA environmental impact by 15.39-26.8%. LoCoMaTech plans to assist in creating 53 commercial production lines and 1700 jobs, in year 6 from the completion of the project. The potential market for low-cost HFQ technology for passenger cars alone is over 160 billion pa, and double this, if buses, trucks, trains and aircraft are considered. This will create huge wealth for Europe and place European automotive industry in a world leading position for lightweight manufacturing technologies for low-end vehicle production.


The objective of eStorage is to develop cost-effective solutions for the widespread deployment of flexible, reliable, GWh-scale storage across EU, and to enhance grid management systems to allow the integration of large share of renewable. The key issue we plan to address is the need for power regulation during low demand periods, when only inflexible baseload generation and intermittent renewable generation are operating. In contrast to conventional generation, a storage plant able to regulate its consumption could help to avoid curtailing wind. Conventional Pumped Storage Hydro Plants (PSP) can only regulate their power in generation mode; variable speed technology for PSP can bring the additional flexibility in pumping mode as well. Developing technically and economically feasible solutions in eStorage will allow upgrading a significant part of European PSP capacity to variable speed, providing up to 10 GW of additional regulation capability with no environmental impact and little administrative burden, all at a much lower cost than developing new plants. We will also develop and demonstrate solutions for coupling the dispatch of storage plants with renewable generation using advances Energy Management Systems. This will enable storage plants to maximise their value in the balancing markets.. From simulation studies, demonstration results and storage potential analysis we will evaluate the system-level benefits of storage and identify development barriers in order to draw recommendations for efficient market and regulatory framework to maximise the impact of project outcomes. eStorage gathers major stakeholders from the entire value chain across EU (Elia TSO, EDF Generation Company, Imperial College Academic Institution, Kema Engineering Consultancy and Alstom Equipment Manufacturer).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NFRP-01-2014 | Award Amount: 8.21M | Year: 2015

The stabilization of molten corium is recognised as essential if a safe and stable state is to be reached following a severe accident. Among the possible options, In-Vessel Melt Retention (IVMR) appears as an attractive solution that would minimize the risks of containment failure (less Hydrogen produced, no corium-concrete interaction), if it can be proved to be feasible. The strategy is already adopted for the VVER 440 type 213 based on thorough research work for the Finnish Loviisa NPP and Hungarian Paks NPP. It is also included in the design of some new Gen.III reactors like AP-1000, APR 1400 and Chinese CPR-1000. It has also been studied in the past for other reactor concepts like KERENA (BWR) or VVER-640. Current approaches for reactors with relatively small power, such as VVER 440 or AP600, use conservative assumptions. However, for higher power reactors (around 1000 MWe), it is necessary to evaluate the IVMR strategy with best-estimate methods in order to address the uncertainties associated with the involved phenomena. Additional R&D is needed to ensure and demonstrate adequate safety margins, including identification of efficient technical solutions for the external cooling of the vessel and performing best-estimate evaluation of relevant scenarios. Among other provisions, the possibility of cooling the corium inside the vessel by direct injection of water into the degraded core, may be considered because it is likely to remove a significant part of the residual power. The goal of the project is an analysis of the applicability and technical feasibility of the IVMR strategy to high power reactors, both for existing ones (e.g. VVER 1000 type 320 units) as well as for future reactors of different types (PWR or BWR). The main outcomes of the project will be elevant assumptions and scenarios to estimate the maximum heat load on the vessel wall, improved numerical tools for the analysis of IVMR issues and a harmonized methodology on the IVMR.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 2.10M | Year: 2013

Most of the 700,000 people in the UK with dementia have not received a formal diagnosis, so are denied access to benefitial treatments. The current NHS approach is slow (often more than 12 months) and often of low quality. This project will develop a novel digital healthcare system that will allow dementia diagnoses to be made quickly, cost effectively, and earlier in the diease course. It makes a novel combination of computer-based tests of memory and thinking and computerized analysis of MRI brain scans, which have been used in research for several years. It will provide support in diagnosis, making available the quality of information currently only available in highly specialist centres to doctors treating all patients, with the aim of reducing time to diagnosis to 3 months. We will build and test a prototype and demonstrate its value before developing a refined prototype that can be rolled-out nationally.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRASUPP-3-2014 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2015

There has never been a greater need for skilled managers and operators of research infrastructure (RI). Europe must develop the workforce that will turn ~50 nascent RIs with sites in different countries into powerhouses of support for major projects comparable to understanding the blueprint of life or discovering new subatomic particles. RItrain will develop a flagship training programme enabling RIs across all domains to gain expertise on governance, organisation, financial and staff management, funding, IP, service provision and outreach in an international context. It will be designed and delivered by experts who have set up and managed RIs from concept to maturity. We will define competencies required by RIs through consultation with their senior managers. The resulting competency framework will underpin a Bologna-compliant degree, the Master in Research Infrastructure Management, with three delivery routes. (1) Professionals working in RIs (or organisations representing them) can dip into the content, focusing on areas where there is most need. (2) Management teams can take the course as an organisation, dividing modules between them to gain a certificate for the RI. This will flag the RI as an organisation that values staff development, improving its attractiveness as an employer. (3) Recent graduates and others wishing to enhance their employability can take a full masters degree. Course content will include webinars led by senior managers of RIs. A staff-exchange programme will catalyse exchange of best practice and foster cooperation to develop a mobile work force effective across many RIs. By the end of the project we will be delivering a masters curriculum funded through course fees. Others with an interest in adopting it will be encouraged to do so, providing a means of expanding the programme. Europes research community and global collaborators will gain from world-class facilities to support excellent, high-impact research to benefit humankind.


Forbes S.J.,University of Edinburgh | Rosenthal N.,Imperial College London | Rosenthal N.,Monash University
Nature Medicine | Year: 2014

Chronic diseases confer tissue and organ damage that reduce quality of life and are largely refractory to therapy. Although stem cells hold promise for treating degenerative diseases by 'seeding' injured tissues, the regenerative capacity of stem cells is influenced by regulatory networks orchestrated by local immune responses to tissue damage, with macrophages being a central component of the injury response and coordinator of tissue repair. Recent research has turned to how cellular and signaling components of the local stromal microenvironment (the 'soil' to the stem cells' seed), such as local inflammatory reactions, contribute to successful tissue regeneration. This Review discusses the basic principles of tissue regeneration and the central role locally acting components may play in the process. Application of seed-and-soil concepts to regenerative medicine strengthens prospects for developing cell-based therapies or for promotion of endogenous repair. © 2014 Nature America, Inc.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-1.10-2015 | Award Amount: 1.83M | Year: 2016

The proposed project Drag Reduction via Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow Control (DRAGY) will approach the problem of turbulent drag reduction through the investigation of active/passive flow-control techniques to manipulate the drag produced by the flow structures in turbulent boundary layers. In addition, the project aims to improve the understanding of the underlying physics behind the control techniques and its interaction with the boundary layer to maximize their efficiency. Turbulent Boundary Layer Control (TBLC) for skin-friction drag reduction is a relatively new technology made possible through the advances in computational-simulation capabilities, which have improved our understanding of the flow structures of turbulence. Advances in micro-electronic technology have enabled the fabrication of actuation systems capable of manipulating these structures. The combination of simulation, understanding and micro-actuation technologies offer new opportunities to significantly decrease drag, and by doing so, increase fuel efficiency of future aircraft. The literature review that follows will show that the application of active control turbulent skin-friction drag reduction is considered of prime importance by industry, even though it is still at a very low Technology Readiness Level (TRL =1). Given the scale of the Flightpath 2050 challenge, now is the appropriate time to investigate the potential of this technology and attempt to raise the TRL to 2 or possibly 3 in some particular branches of the subject. DRAGY proposes a European R&T collaborative effort specifically focused on active and passive control for turbulent skin-friction drag reduction. The project will result in mutual benefits for industry and scientific European as well as Chinese communities, in a topic of growing concern, namely drag-reduction technologies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-08-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 5.92M | Year: 2016

The EU targets at replacing 10% of all transport fossil fuels with biofuels by 2020 to reduce the dependence on petroleum through the use of nationally, regionally or locally produced biofuels, while simultaneously reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, the EU is concerned with the questionable sustainability of the conventional biofuels and the unattractive production costs of second and third generation biofuels. The BioMates project aspires to contribute to the drastic increase of non-food/feed biomass utilisation for the production of greener transportation fuels via an effective and sustainable new production pathway. The project will validate the proposed innovative technology which has the potential of over 49 million tons CO2-eq savings, at least 7% crude oil imports reduction which corresponds to over 7 billion savings for EU, while indicating its socio-economic, environmental and health expected benefits. The main premise of the BioMates project is the cost-effective and decentralized valorization of residual (straw) and nonfood (Miscanthus) biomass for the production of bio-based products of over 99% bioenergy content. The bio-based products targeted market is the EU refining sector, utilizing them as a bio-based co-feed of reliable, standardizable properties for underlying conversion units, yielding high bio-content hybrid fuels which are compatible with conventional combustion systems. The BioMates approach is based on innovative non-food/feed biomass conversion technologies, including ablative fast pyrolysis and mild catalytic hydrotreating, while incorporating state-of-the-art renewable H2-production technology as well as optimal energy integration. The proposed pathway for decarbonizing the transportation fuels will be demonstrated via TRL5 units, allowing the development of an integrated, sustainability-driven business case encompassing commercial and social exploitation strategy.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-24-2015 | Award Amount: 8.36M | Year: 2016

Due to an aging population and the spiralling cost of brain disease in Europe and beyond, EDEN2020 aims to develop the gold standard for one-stop diagnosis and minimally invasive treatment in neurosurgery. Supported by a clear business case, it will exploit the unique track record of leading research institutions and key industrial players in the field of surgical robotics to overcome the current technological barriers that stand in the way of real clinical impact. EDEN2020 will provide a step change in the modelling, planning and delivery of diagnostic sensors and therapies to the brain via flexible surgical access, with an initial focus on cancer therapy. It will engineer a family of steerable catheters for chronic disease management that can be robotically deployed and kept in situ for extended periods. The system will feature enhanced autonomy, surgeon cooperation, targeting proficiency and fault tolerance with a suite of technologies that are commensurate to the unique challenges of neurosurgery. Amongst these, the system will be able to sense and perceive intraoperative, continuously deforming, brain anatomy at unmatched accuracy, precision and update rates, and deploy a range of diagnostic optical sensors with the potential to revolutionise todays approach to brain disease management. By modelling and predicting drug diffusion within the brain with unprecedented fidelity, EDEN2020 will contribute to the wider clinical challenge of extending and enhancing the quality of life of cancer patients with the ability to plan therapies around delicate tissue structures and with unparalleled delivery accuracy. EDEN2020 is strengthened by a significant industrial presence, which is embedded within the entire R&D process to enforce best practices and maximise translation and the exploitation of project outputs. As it aspires to impact the state of the art and consolidate the position of European industrial robotics, it will directly support the Europe 2020 Strategy.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 971.99K | Year: 2015

Gas Turbines (GTs) will figure prominently in complimenting the intermittent power generated by renewables, while varied fuel sources by 2050 are likely to include biofuels (the former a mixture of methane, carbon mono- and di-oxide and nitrogen - essentially low calorific value fuel) and perhaps shale gas and hydrogen. In meeting CO2 emissions targets, there will be a premium on designs that (i) have the highest fuel conversion efficiency and (ii) integrate with carbon capture and storage. Such designs include either humid air turbines (HAT) or schemes with extensive exhaust, or flue, gas recirculation together with the use of oxygen-enriched air. There is extensive techno-economic evaluation of these designs with no preferred winner and it is likely that each will find extensive application. Thus, there will be a need to design combustion chambers to burn low calorific gases, with oxidant streams including up to 30% (w/w) of steam, pure oxygen or oxygen heavily diluted with Carbon dioxide. Such changes present formidable difficulties to flame stability and extinction. The design of low NOx combustion chambers has shown the value of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in developing commercially viable designs and this trend will strengthen. Finally, the value of suitable sensors during development has proved its worth. This research identifies the gaps in existing physical understanding, CFD and optical sensors, to be addressed by fundamental research, that need to be filled so that step change GT technologies can be developed by industry. This proposal will develop tools and understanding as follows: (i) On-line, near real time optical sensor to measure the Wobbe index of fuel entering the gas turbine, since fast knowledge of the calorific value of highly variable bio- fuels is important for control of future GTs. (ii) Flame stability and extinction is associated with the existence of a critical rate of stretch and the largest laminar flame speed that the flame can experience due to the aerodynamic flow field of the combustors. Designers, using CFD for flow prediction in combustion chambers, need to know these critical values for the range of fuels and oxidants, which will be in use up to 2050. Thus, this proposal will obtain measurements of these values in premixed and non-premixed flames as a function of preheat and pressure and analyse the process of flame extinction in laboratory and pilot scale model combustors using, amongst other instruments, detection of CO and formaldehyde by planar laser induced fluorescence. (iii) Low NOx emissions require the fuel to be well premixed and it is useful for development engineers to have access to an instrument, which can measure local fuel/air ratio on test stands. Building on previous successful development of an instrument based on natural chemiluminescent emissions from a flame, there will be an evaluation of its calibration as a function of pressure and humidity, the latter in the context of a HAT gas turbine design. (iv) Thermoacoustic instability is a destructive high intensity limit cycle, which is either avoided operationally or designs are improved largely by cut and try methods. Until recently, the transition to this limit cycle and the limit cycle itself were characterised by frequency and phase spectral analysis. Our recent work has shown that non-linear time series analysis reveals that transition to high amplitude oscillations retains a structure as determined by chaos theory. We will use this form of analysis to identify the fluid mechanical structures responsible for this behaviour, with the aim of devising methods to at least warn gas turbine operators of impending thermoacoustic instability. (v) The best available LES CFD methods will be evaluated using the measurements in the counterflow and model combustor geometries. There will also be direct assessment, through the measurements, of the sub-grid contribution of LES methodology to calculations


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-09-2014 | Award Amount: 3.95M | Year: 2015

The rapid increase in demand for data-intensive applications capable of exploiting Big Data technologies such as Hadoop/MapReduce, NoSQL, cloud-based storage, and stream processing is creating massive growth opportunities for European independent software vendors (ISVs). However, developing software that meets the high-quality standards expected for business-critical cloud applications remains a barrier to this market for many small and medium ISVs, which often lack resources and expertise for advanced quality engineering. DICE will tackle this challenge by defining a quality-driven development methodology and related tools that will markedly accelerate the development of business-critical data-intensive applications running on public or private clouds. Building on the principles of model-driven development (MDD) and on popular standards such as UML, MARTE and TOSCA, the project will first define a novel MDD methodology that can describe data and data-intensive technologies in cloud applications. A quality engineering toolchain offering simulation, verification, and numerical optimisation will leverage these extensions to drive the early design stages of the application development and guide software quality evolution. DevOps-inspired methods for deployment, testing, continuous integration and monitoring feedback analysis will be used to accelerate the incorporation of quality in data-intensive cloud application both in public and private deployments, enhancing the capability of small and medium European ISVs to enter the Big Data market.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2012.2.2-1 | Award Amount: 18.29M | Year: 2013

Articulating joint replacements represent a medical market exceeding 14 billion p.a. that is expected to rise as demographics reflect an ageing population. However, faster growth has been seen in the revision market, where prosthetic joints are replaced, than in primary interventions. The major cause of these revisions is that all joint replacements are prone to wear leading to loss of implant function. Further, it has been demonstrated that adverse or extreme loading has a detrimental effect on implant performance. Thus, device failure still occurs too frequently leading to the conclusion that their longevity and reliability must be improved. The premise of this proposal is to realise that wear and corrosion are an inevitable consequence of all implant interfaces within contemporary total joint replacements. To overcome this problem our novel approach is to use silicon nitride coatings in which the combined high wear resistance of this material and solubility of any silicon nitride wear particles released, reduce the overall potential for adverse tissue reactions. In this work a variety of silicon nitride based coatings will be applied to different tribological scenarios related to total hip arthroplasty. The coatings suitability in each scenario will be assessed against target profiles. In particular, it is important to consider coating performance within each of these applications under adverse conditions as well as those outlined in internationally utilised standards. To accomplish this, cutting-edge adverse simulation techniques, in vitro assays and animal models will be developed together with a suite of computational assessments to significantly enhance device testing in terms of predicting clinical performance. Data will inform new standards development and enhance current testing scenarios, and will provide 5 European enterprises with a significant market advantage, whilst providing data for a regulatory submission which is aligned with Dir 93/42/EEC.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.9.2 | Award Amount: 1.38M | Year: 2014

Starting with some specific types of cancers, this project will try to generalize the methodology to discriminate between healthy and malignant tissues in real-time during surgical procedures. Using the hyperspectral signatures of the healthy tissues and the same tissues affected by cancer, a mathematical model of how cancer affects to the hyperspectral signature will be derived. The research will start with the challenging task of brain cancer detection. A precise resection of the gliomas will minimize the negative effect of removing brain cells while assuring an effective tumour resection. The second type of tumours to be analysed will be the lung and breast cancers as they represent the two most common cancers in the world. Based on the experience gained during the evolution of the project and guided by the oncologist expertise, many other types of cancer out from the more than 200 that affect human beings will be studied. As cancer supposes a change in the cellular physiology, it should be detected as a change in the hyper-spectral signature. This project will try to determine if there is a certain pattern that could be identified as a cancer hyperspectral signature. Although previous works demonstrates that hyperspectral imaging can be used for certain cancer detection in animals, no application to human beings in real-time surgery has been found. This project will develop an experimental intraoperative setup based on non-invasive hyperspectral cameras connected to a platform running a set of algorithms capable of discriminate between healthy or pathological tissues. This information will be provided, through different display devices to the surgeon, overlapping normal viewing images with simulated colours that will indicate the cancer probability of the tissue presently exposed during every instant of the surgical procedure. A high-efficiency hardware/software prototype will be developed with the aim of recognising cancer tissues on real time.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 1.23M | Year: 2016

The goal of this project is to develop a lasting collaboration between top class research teams in Europe and China that fosters progress in the broad area of perovskite optoelectronics through progress in materials science, chemistry, device physics, photophysics, and device engineering. This will be realized via a cross-European, trans-continental network. Such a network is required as perovskite opotoelectronics is a research area that requires strong collaborations between researchers with different background. More specifically, the PEOPLE network is intended as a key driver for the development of perovskite optoelectronics. Multiple disciplines need to be involved so that PEOPLE can cover the entire knowledge chain: the design/synthesis of perovskite materials, processing/characterization of perovskite films, photovoltaic applications of perovskites, other emerging optoelectronic devices based on perovskites, device physics and photophysics. The combined expertise in PEOPLE is essential to achieve a transformative impact. This project regroups leading research teams in the domain of perovskite optoelectronics, with complementary expertise, in an attempt to synergise the research effort in this area. The most important results from this project will be the human resources generated. This project will allow the exchange of ideas between top class researchers in Europe and China, both at a senior scientist level and most importantly at a junior level. Maintaining this ambition to educate researchers in a highly multidisciplinary fashion, in cutting edge techniques, is a central goal of this project. It is expected that the recognition and training of young talent in the development of perovskite optoelectronics will have long lasting benefits both for fundamental research and industry in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-11-2014 | Award Amount: 6.00M | Year: 2015

Photofuel studies and advances the biocatalytic production of alternative liquid transportation fuels, which require only sunlight, CO2 and water. Microbial cells directly excrete hydrocarbon and long chain alcohol fuel compounds to the medium from which they are separated, without the need to harvest biomass. This significantly improves the costs and energy balances as only a minimum of nutrients is required for self-replication of the biocatalyst, whilst cell harvesting, drying and lipid extraction is omitted. Such minimum-input systems are compatible with operation on degraded or desert land which avoids the pitfalls of most of the currently available biofuel technologies. The products are drop-in fuels that fully or partially replace their fossil counterparts without the need for new infrastructure. To set a benchmark for alternative solar fuels, three research groups will collaborate in the advancement of the biocatalysts from TRL 3. The best biocatalytic system(s) will be up-scaled and operated outdoors in photobioreactors modified for direct fuel separation at a scale of several cubic meters (TRL 4-5). The identification of optimal future fuel blends with a fossil fuel base and Photofuel biofuels as additives, as well as the analysis of performance and emissions in car or truck engines, will be evaluated by the oil- and automotive-industry partners. The entire pathway will be assessed for environmental and economic performance as well as social acceptance of large scale production in rural communities and by the consumer. All results will be combined to a business development plan, which clearly identifies the opportunities but also the challenges prior to an economic fuel production in compliance to the EC Fuel Quality Directive.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.97M | Year: 2015

Mobility, important for well-being, is seriously impaired by chronic low back pain and osteoarthritis in many people due to degeneration of cartilaginous tissue of the intervertebral disc and joint. To develop a treatment for these diseases this ETN aims to combine expertise in novel highly advanced drug delivery carriers with dedicated targeting tools, state of the art imaging techniques and expertise in stem cell and joint biology by training 15 young scientists in 12 partner institutes located in 5 different countries. We aim to achieve regeneration of damaged and degenerated tissues by employing targeting strategies tailored both to the pathology and the tissues involved. Regeneration of diseased tissues will be achieved by loading biologically active agents in state-of-the-art nanocarriers. The biologically active agents will stimulate the bodys own capacity to regenerate by attracting local stem cells or inhibit degeneration. Targeting will be achieved by A] injection with synthetic or natural hydrogels loaded with the nanocarriers or B] coupling diseased tissue-specific antibodies and specific hyaluronic acid moieties to the nanocarriers. Delivery and retention will be monitored by advanced in vivo and molecular imaging techniques to monitor distribution of the delivered compounds at the tissue level, as well as detect biological markers of regeneration. Major objectives: 1] To establish a network of scientists skilled in the use of smart nanocarriers, unique approach of targeting by disease-specific molecules and application of innovative imaging tools. Supported by generic scientific and training in economical and clinical valorisation, these researchers can further implement these technologies in the musculoskeletal or other areas, both in academia and industry. 2] To develop strategies exclusively targeting diseased tissues with controlled doses of bio-actives, circumventing the disadvantages of the current shotgun approaches in regenerative medicine.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: COMPET-06-2015 | Award Amount: 996.11K | Year: 2016

While significant effort has been and is being provided to address planetary protection in the context of inner Solar System exploration, and in particular Mars, PPOSS will allow tackling the scientific, technological and policy-making specifics of Planetary Protection (biological and organic contamination) of outer solar system bodies, including small solar system bodies. Through an intensive three year programme, the project will nurture and catalyse discussions, analysis, exchange of knowledge and definition of strategic science and policy recommendations, therefore allowing a leap in the understanding of biological and organic contamination in the frame of outer solar system bodies exploration. PPOSS intends to consider and delineate the state of the art, identify lessons to be learnt and good practices in planetary protection. Looking forward, PPOSS will identify scientific challenges and knowledge gaps as well as define scientific requirement for outer Solar system bodies planetary protection. PPOSS will also involve interactions with the European industry and will develop as set of European industry roadmaps. Eventually PPOSS will use and integrate the information and knowledge produced through the project to provide science and policy recommendations for the definition, improvement, and implementation of an adequate planetary protection policy for outer Solar system bodies. PPOSS will also be very active on dissemination and exchange of Planetary Protection-related knowledge and know-how. PPOSS will bring in four international partners from three non-European countries (Japan, China and Russia) as well as one observer from US. Participating in the project implementation (they will be part of the Steering Committee) and involving their experts, these organisations will enrich and extend the scope of the project, making it a true international initiative. PPOSS will last 3 years but COSPAR will be maintain and update its main outputs beyond its lifetime.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.84M | Year: 2015

MUltiSectoral Integrative approaches to CArdiac care MUSICA - is proposed by a team of universities, companies and hospitals from 4 EU countries (Italy, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Belgium). The main scope of MUSICA is to structure a new trans-sectoral and multidisciplinary network capable of developing research and technology with no barriers between academia, industries and clinicians in the cardiac arena, and of shaping young researchers with a novel and truly multidisciplinary mindset, capable of developing clinical- and business-oriented technology including tools for the advancement of base knowledge. MUSICA activity will impact on the field of cardiac surgery in three ways: i) from a scientific standpoint, new knowledge will be gained regarding the response of tissues to their surgical reshaping, to the implantation of devices and to drugs; ii) from a technological standpoint, new technologies will be developed to improve the design and generation of new clinical solutions, the clinical training, and image-based diagnosis and prognosis; iii) from an educational standpoint, a new paradigm of PhD track will be implemented, which will combine academic research in the field of biomedical engineering with industrial research activities and with on-the-field activity within clinical infrastructures. This novel PhD track will be accessed by 15 Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) recruited in the project by universities (7) and companies (8).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-20-2015 | Award Amount: 3.90M | Year: 2016

Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC, frequently defined as ASD - Autism Spectrum Disorders) are neurodevelopmental conditions, characterized by social communication difficulties and restricted and repetitive behaviour patterns. There are over 5 million people with autism in Europe around 1 in every 100 people, affecting lives of over 20 million people each day. Alongside their difficulties, individuals with ASC tend to have intact and sometimes superior abilities to comprehend and manipulate closed, rule-based, predictable systems, such as robot-based technology. Over the last couple of years, this has led to several attempts to teach emotion recognition and expression to individuals with ASC, using humanoid robots. This has been shown to be very effective as an integral part of the psychoeducational therapy for children with ASC. The main reason for this is that humanoid robots are perceived by children with autism as being more predictable, less complicated, less threatening, and more comfortable to communicate with than humans, with all their complex and frightening subtleties and nuances. The proposed project aims to create and evaluate the effectiveness of such a robot-based technology, directed for children with ASC. This technology will enable to realise robust, context-sensitive (such as user- and culture-specific), multimodal (including facial, bodily, vocal and verbal cues) and naturalistic human-robot interaction (HRI) aimed at enhancing the social imagination skills of children with autism. The proposed will include the design of effective and user-adaptable robot behaviours for the target user group, leading to more personalised and effective therapies than previously realised. Carers will be offered their own supportive environment, including professional information, reports of childs progress and use of the system and forums for parents and therapists.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.6.4 | Award Amount: 4.07M | Year: 2013

Smart grids make current energy networks more intelligent and accessible; new ways of producing energy will soon make citizens not only energy users but also energy producers. The CIVIS project explores the potential of social networks and communities to significantly reduce energy use and carbon emissions. Well enable this by developing business models for the resulting energy value system and support it with the necessary ICT.\n\nMore specifically CIVIS will implement a distributed ICT system to 1) manage communities energy needs, 2) negotiate individual and collective energy service agreements and contracts, 3) raise awareness about the environmental impacts of collective energy use, and 4) allocate energy production resources more efficiently.\n\nThe project will focus on two pilot neighborhoods located in Trento and Stockholm in close collaboration with energy companies, citizen groups and local administrations. Project partners will test and evaluate the technology, clarify business potential and estimate the impact of envisioned deployment on a European scale.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IAPP | Award Amount: 2.65M | Year: 2014

ATLAS-MHC is proposed as a follow-up action of the successfully running ATLAS-H2 IAPP project which has already provided remarkable achievements on solving challenging issues in compressing and storing hydrogen. The major aims are to up-scale the laboratory prototype metal-hydride compressor (MHC) developed under ATLAS-H2 and to evaluate the pilot scale, precompetitive MHC implemented in a complete renewable energy storage system. A significant objective of the project will also be the assessment of the current market for metal-hydride compressors especially in storing energy from Renewable Sources (RES) in the form of hydrogen. Market penetration activities & a concrete business plan will be developed in that respect. This proposal builds upon the promising results of the running ATLAS-H2 IAPP project on solving challenging issues in high pressure hydrogen storage without mechanical compression and with reduced energy losses. Indeed, in the frame of ATLAS-H2 a laboratory prototype Metal Hydride Compressor (MHC) for hydrogen has been designed and developed at the premises of the participating SME Hystore Technologies. ATLAS-H2 has successfully undergone a thorough mid-term review eight months ago (May 2012) by external expert reviewer appointed by the EC. The mid-term review report includes very positive comments about the remarkable achievements and the work done so far, the prospects for the remaining project duration, the qualifications and scientific level of the participating staff and the very efficient coordination. The present extension of the original ATLAS project aspires to upscale and bring close to commercialization the main outcome of ATLAS-H2 (the Metal Hydride Compressor) while paying considerable attention to the demonstration of its potential applications (RES storage, hydrogen filling stations for vehicles, etc) and the development of a complete business plan for market deployment and penetration.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-11-2014 | Award Amount: 7.27M | Year: 2015

OrganiCity offers a new paradigm to European digital city making. Built on and extending the FIRE legacy, this project seeks to build a strong foundation for future sustainable cities through co-creation by a wide range of stakeholders. Globally, Europe is a champion of sustainable, inclusive and open societies. The digital age enables us to push this position further and to rethink the way we create cities and facilitate living by integrating many complex systems. OrganiCity combines top-down planning and operations with flexible bottom-up initiatives where citizen involvement is key. So far, this has been difficult to achieve. Previous attempts to scale informal one-off projects or broaden single community projects have failed. By focusing on the city as a sociotechnical whole, OrganiCity brings software, hardware and associated human processes flexibly together into a new living city that is replicable, scalable, as well as socially, environmentally and economically sustainable. Three clusters Aarhus (DK), London (UK) and Santander (ES) recognised for their digital urban initiatives, bring their various stakeholders together into a coherent effort to develop an integrated Experimentation-as-a-Service facility respecting ethical and privacy sensitivities and potentially improving the lives of millions of people. The OrganiCity consortium will create a novel set of tools for civic co-creation, well beyond the state of the art in trans-disciplinary participatory urban interaction design. The tools will be validated in each cluster and integrated across the three cities. In addition to citizen-centric join of testbeds, partner technologies and enhancements, two open calls with a budget of 1.8M will permit 25-35 experiments to use the new facility and co-creation tools. The aim is to grow sustainable digital solutions for future cities that are adjusted to the culture and capacities of each city unlocking amended services and novel markets.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-1.2-2015 | Award Amount: 6.83M | Year: 2016

For decades, most of the aviation research activities have been focused on the reduction of noise and NOx and CO2 emissions. However, emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines of non-volatile PM, consisting primarily of soot particles, are of international concern today. Despite the lack of knowledge toward soot formation processes and characterization in terms of mass and size, engine manufacturers have now to deal with both gas and particles emissions. Furthermore, heat transfer understanding, that is also influenced by soot radiation, is an important matter for the improvement of the combustors durability, as the key point when dealing with low-emissions combustor architectures is to adjust the air flow split between the injection system and the combustors walls. The SOPRANO initiative consequently aims at providing new elements of knowledge, analysis and improved design tools, opening the way to: Alternative designs of combustion systems for future aircrafts that will enter into service after 2025 capable of simultaneously reducing gaseous pollutants and particles, Improved liner lifetime assessment methods. Therefore, the SOPRANO project will deliver more accurate experimental and numerical methodologies for predicting the soot emissions in academic or semi-technical combustion systems. This will contribute to enhance the comprehension of soot particles formation and their impact on heat transfer through radiation. In parallel, the durability of cooling liner materials, related to the walls air flow rate, will be addressed by heat transfer measurements and predictions. Finally, the expected contribution of SOPRANO is to apply these developments in order to determine the main promising concepts, in the framework of current low-NOx technologies, able to control the emitted soot particles in terms of mass and size over a large range of operating conditions without compromising combustors liner durability and performance toward NOx emissions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-22-2014 | Award Amount: 3.92M | Year: 2015

The eNHANCE project key objective is to symbiotically mechanically support and motivate people with motor impairments resulting from muscular or neural degeneration (e.g. stroke) to perform complex daily life tasks. Our system aims to assist the user in performing their daily-life interaction with the environment through an intelligent multi-modal adaptive interface controlled by a high performance intention detection input interface and a personalised behavioural model. The eNHANCE active support orthotics enables the users to achieve their desired movement actions, while motivating the users to maximize their own force contribution. This will maximize user performance relative to their personal capacity, and so maximize therapeutic effects. This requires a personalized mechanical support system taking into account personal behaviour in response to arm and hand support characteristics, supplementary motivational inputs provided by the system and context. Our personalized behaviour model will be constantly predicting user performance. This model is adaptively identified based on the discrepancy between observed and predicted user performance. The eNHANCE consortium provides a unique combination of European companies, knowledge and clinical institutes required to tackle this challenge. The expertise covers such diverse fields as body-mounted sensing, high-performance intention detection, machine intelligence, behavioral monitoring and modeling, dexterous mechatronic arm and handfunction support, intelligent and user-enabling daily-life care, and economical and clinical exploitation of such new approaches. The research and innovation will be driven by clinical user and industrial requirements identification and is finalized by clinical validation and industrial prototype realization and demonstration.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETOPEN-1-2014 | Award Amount: 3.35M | Year: 2015

Biosensors possess recognition elements that bind to target molecules which lead to detectable signals; they are made of two basic components: (i) a bioreceptor or biorecognition element; and (ii) a transducer element. The bioreceptor system interacts with the target analyte and this interaction is monitored by the transducer, which converts the information into a measurable effect such as an electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signal. This project proposes the development of an autonomous electrochemical biosensor that is lightweight, disposable and low cost by using an outstanding innovative approach: hosting synergistically the bioreceptor element inside a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Such approach will provide an electrically independent, very simple, miniaturized, autonomous electrical biosensor. The electrical dependency is eliminated by coupling the biosensor to an electrochemical transducer that is capable of autonomous energy production, the fuel cell. This work proposes a merge between electrical biosensors and fuel cells, combining the advantages of both areas of research in a single synergetic device. In this envisaged innovative device, the electrical signal obtained from the DMFC is directly related to the concentration of the cancer biomarker in the sample analyzed. The proposed electrochemical biosensor will be completely autonomous operating at room temperature and using the oxygen present in the air, thereby allowing diagnosis everywhere.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.65M | Year: 2016

Energy sustainability is key to future mobile networks due to their foreseen capacity upsurge. The objective of the ETN SCAVENGE (Sustainable CellulAr networks harVEstiNG ambient Energy) is to create a training network for early-stage researchers (ESRs) who will contribute to the design and implementation of eco-friendly and sustainable next-generation (5G) networks and become leaders in the related scientific, technological, and industrial initiatives. Sustainable networks are based on the premise that environmental energy can be scavenged through dedicated harvesting hardware so as to power 5G base stations (BSs) and the end devices (mobile terminals, sensors and machines). To realise this vision, the project will take a complete approach, encompassing the characterisation of intermittent and/or erratic energy sources, the development of theoretical models, and the design, optimisation and proof-of-concept implementation of core network, BS and mobile elements as well as their integration with the smart electrical grid. The consortium is composed of world-class research centres and companies that are in the forefront of mobile communication and renewable energy research and technology development. The attitude of the industrial partners towards the strong investment in R&D and their strategic vision are fully aligned with the mission of this project, making them perfectly fit for this consortium. This grants a well-balanced project with genuine and strong technical interactions. The ESRs will have a unique opportunity towards professional growth in light of dedicated cross-partner training activities and through the interaction with the Partner Organisations, which also include relevant stakeholders in the envisioned market. All of this will ensure that the trained researchers will be successfully employed at the end of the research program.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-28-2015 | Award Amount: 3.89M | Year: 2016

This proposal is for a personalised decision support system for chronic disease management that will make predictions based on real-time data in order to empower individuals to participate in the self-management of their disease. The design will involve users at every stage to ensure that the system meets patient needs and raises clinical outcomes by preventing adverse episodes and improving lifestyle, monitoring and quality of life. Research will be conducted into the development of an innovative adaptive decision support system based on case-based reasoning combined with predictive computer modelling. The tool will offer bespoke advice for self-management by integrating personal health systems with broad and various sources of physiological, lifestyle, environmental and social data. The research will also examine the extent to which human behavioural factors and usability issues have previously hindered the wider adoption of personal guidance systems for chronic disease self-management. It will be developed and validated initially for people with diabetes on basal-bolus insulin therapy, but the underlying approach can be adapted to other chronic diseases. There will be a strong emphasis on safety, with glucose predictions, dose advice, alarms, limits and uncertainties communicated clearly to raise individual awareness of the risk of adverse events such as hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia. The outputs of this research will be validated in an ambulatory setting and a key aspect will be innovation management. All components will adhere to medical device standards in order to meet regulatory requirements and ensure interoperability, both with existing personal health systems and commercial products. The resulting architecture will improve interactions with healthcare professionals and provide a generic framework for providing adaptive mobile decision support, with innovation capacity to be applied to other applications, thereby increasing the impact of the project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: WASTE-1-2014 | Award Amount: 9.67M | Year: 2015

The RESLAG project proposal is aligned with the challenges outlined in the call WASTE-1-2014: Moving towards a circular economy through industrial symbiosis. In 2010, the European steel industry generated, as waste, about 21.8 Mt of steel slag. The 76 % of the slag was recycled in applications such as aggregates for construction or road materials, but these sectors were unable to absorb the total amount of produced slag. The remaining 24 % was landfilled (2.9 Mt) or self-stored (2.3 Mt). The landfilled slag represents a severe environmental problem. The main aim of RESLAG is to prove that there are industrial sectors able to make an effective use of the 2.9 Mt/y of landfilled slag, if properly supported by the right technologies. In making this prof, the RESLAG project will also prove that there are other very important environmental benefits coming from an active use of the slag in industrial processes, as CO2 saving (up to 970 kt/y from CSP applications, at least 71 kg/ton of produced steel from heat recovery applications), and elimination of negative impacts associated with mining (from the recovery of valuable metals and from the production of ceramic materials). To achieve this ambitious goal four large-scale demonstrations to recycle steel slag are considered: Extraction of non-ferrous high added metals; TES for heat recovery applications; TES to increase dispatchability of the CSP plant electricity; Production of innovative refractory ceramic compounds. Overall, the RESLAG project aims at an innovative organizational steel by-products management model able to reach high levels of resource and energy efficiency, which considers a cascade of upgrading processes and a life cycle perspective. All these demonstrations will be lead by the industries involved in the RESLAG consortium. The RESLAG project is supported by the main organizations representing energy-intensive industries, CSP sector, energy platforms, governments, etc.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 551.39K | Year: 2015

Invasive species are currently considered second only to habitat loss as a cause of rapid and undesirable changes in the functioning of ecosystems worldwide. In the United Kingdom alone, the annual cost of invasive species is estimated to be ~£1.7 billion. In this context, major cause for concern is that human-mediated species translocations and global warming are both causing rapid shifts in species ranges and phonologies at an escalating rate. For example, a Pacific diatom Neodenticula seminae was documented into the North Atlantic for the first time in 800,000 years due to climate-driven melting of the Arctic ice cap and changes in ocean circulation. Such abrupt introductions can result in novel interactions (e.g., predator-prey or resource competition), which then have the potential to result in disruptive invasions of non-native species into local communities. In this project, we will meet the challenge of developing a general framework for predicting invasion success by building the first-ever global database on the temperature dependence of metabolic (physiological) traits relevant to species invasions through interactions, use these data to develop and parameterize a novel theoretical framework, and test some key predictions of this theory using laboratory experiments with a globally important functional group, the Phytoplankton (photosynthetic unicellular marine and freshwater algae and bacteria). Phytoplankton form the base of form the base of most aquatic food webs and contribute over half of global primary production. We will address three core questions: (1) How will mismatches in how metabolic traits (e.g., respiration and photosynthesis rate) of natives and non-native species respond to temperature change affect invasions? This question is important because new species often arrive with the physiological baggage of the environment they originated in, and therefore may be poorly adapted to their new environment (at least initially). (2) Doe the rate and magnitude of thermal acclimation (defined as phenotypic changes in thermal-response with change in environmental temperature) in a non-native species to its new environment influence its invasion success? This question is important because many species can overcome the initial disadvantage of a novel environment by rapidly adjusting the way their metabolism responds to temperature. (3) Are natural temperature cycles important determinants of invasion success? This question is important because species invasions, especially in temperate regions, take place in climates that change cyclically at daily (say-night cycles) and seasonal (e.g., winter-summer) scales. Therefore, a non-native species that arrives, say, in winter, may have a lesser chance of invading successfully than if it arrived in summer. Overall, this study will fill a major gap in our understanding of the importance of metabolic constraints on species interactions for species invasions. We expect our results to form a new and robust foundation for predicting species invasions in natural as well as human-dominated environments. Our global database on metabolic traits will be a valuable, long-term resource for mapping metabolic traits onto potentially invasive species, and also for parameterizing ongoing efforts to model the effects of climate change on ecosystem services, including the carbon cycle.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETHPC-1-2014 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2015

To handle the stringent performance requirements of future exascale High Performance Computing (HPC) applications, HPC systems need ultra-efficient heterogeneous compute nodes. To reduce power and increase performance, such compute nodes will require reconfiguration as an intrinsic feature, so that specific HPC application features can be optimally accelerated at all times, even if they regularly change over time. In the EXTRA project, we create a new and flexible exploration platform for developing reconfigurable architectures, design tools and HPC applications with run-time reconfiguration built-in from the start. The idea is to enable the efficient co-design and joint optimization of architecture, tools, applications, and reconfiguration technology in order to prepare for the necessary HPC hardware nodes of the future. The project EXTRA covers the complete chain from architecture up to the application: More coarse-grain reconfigurable architectures that allow reconfiguration on higher functionality levels and therefore provide much faster reconfiguration than at the bit level. The development of just-in time synthesis tools that are optimized for fast (but still efficient) re-synthesis of application phases to new, specialized implementations through reconfiguration. The optimization of applications that maximally exploit reconfiguration. Suggestions for improvements to reconfigurable technologies to enable the proposed reconfiguration of the architectures. In conclusion, EXTRA focuses on the fundamental building blocks for run-time reconfigurable exascale HPC systems: new reconfigurable architectures with very low reconfiguration overhead, new tools that truly take reconfiguration as a design concept, and applications that are tuned to maximally exploit run-time reconfiguration techniques. Our goal is to provide the European platform for run-time reconfiguration to maintain Europes competitive edge and leadership in run-time reconfigurable computing.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.90M | Year: 2016

The increasing environmental awareness of the European society has been always present in the aeronautical community, industry and research centres, having a definite influence on the way the aircraft of the future should be. In this line, the ACARE Vision for 2020, a Group of Renowned Personalities in the aeronautical field, has formulated a clear set of requirements for civil transport aircraft operations in order to reach the following specific environmental goals: halving perceived aircraft noise, 50% cut in CO2 emissions per passenger-km and 80% cut in NOx emissions. Many of these goals have a direct connection with the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft; mainly with aerodynamic technologies. Most of the elements of the aerodynamics of conventional aircraft are modelled and understood to some degree but reliable solutions are not available due to new challenges appearing as the technology matures. One of the most common problems is related to stability analysis for configurations in the limits of the flight envelope or when unsteady effects are dominant. This challenge is the object of the research of SSeMID, and is the focus of the international training plan for young engineers employed within the network. The project will provide valuable information for such aerodynamic structures paving the way to its complete industrialization while increasing the academic knowledge regarding instability mechanisms and covering the necessary skills and knowledge to train experts in this area


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-1.1.9. | Award Amount: 10.48M | Year: 2013

In recent years, biomedical research has crossed international borders in large, collaborative studies showing the value of multidisciplinarity and scale advantage. This has yielded valuable insights and some led to new and better medicines and treatments for diseases. However, disease-focused studies provide less insight in the real disease onset, the relative disease burden in the population, and the actual comparability of selected patients. Large prospective cohort (LPC) studies following up initially healthy participants for years or decades are considered more reliable and different diseases can be studied. LPC studies require large numbers of subjects which are costly but particularly benefited from the advent of high throughput techniques providing opportunities for powerful study designs. This project unites the large study sets of the European Biobanking and Biomolecular Research Infrastructure (BBMRI) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), thus achieving a worldwide unique scale of integration. Specifically, we aim to:1)Evaluate/improve the harmonization of individual data on health, lifestyle and other exposures;2)Develop/implement harmonized definitions of diseases;3)Improve biobanking and research technologies and develop innovative solutions facilitating high-quality, fair access to samples and data;4)Provide free transnational access by users, through study proposals selected by an open, pan-European call;5)In the framework of these studies, generate and provide access to whole genome sequences, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and methylome data;6)Build new public-private partnerships involving large-scale prospective cohorts, and strengthening existing ones, allowing transparent industrial access to academic expertise;7) Build a network transferring the expertise of established European large-scale biobanks to new biobank initiatives under development in other countries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.92M | Year: 2013

IN-SENS is an interdisciplinary, cutting-edge European industry-academia collaborative effort for a novel training of scientists in molecular psychiatry with the prospect of discovering the biology of schizophrenia and actively promote drug discovery. Mental illnesses are a major burden to patients, relatives, and public health worldwide. IN-SENS therefore aims to profoundly change the academic-industry research landscape in European psychiatry by an unprecedented, innovative strategy. The extended intra- and intercellular signalling pathway of disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), the best characterized gene known to cause schizophrenia and other chronic mental illnesses (CMI), will be used as a molecular Rosetta stone for this purpose. Expected results of IN-SENS include profound training, including clinical psychiatry, industrial, and translational medicine exposure, of a new generation of European ESRs capable of understanding the molecular underpinnings of CMI in academia, industry and other non-academic sectors. ESRs will explore how molecules related to the extended DISC1 pathway translate to the different biochemical, genetic, and neurodevelopmental hypotheses and data proposed so far as being important players in the molecular pathology of CMI. Further, they will play an active role in the generation of new analytical tools and therapeutic agents for the diagnosis and treatment of CMI in close collaboration with the industrial sector. IN-SENS will have immediate and longterm benefits for the European academic-industry research landscape in psychiatry by fostering scientific creativity and entrepreneurial skills of ESRs, generating novel research networks in Europe, enhancing mutual recognition and introducing novel models and of public-private cooperations. At the end of IN-SENS, exceptionally trained ESRs will be ready to extend these studies in academia and/or the private sector, and be able to move confidently to a fruitful professional career.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-1.1-2014 | Award Amount: 3.05M | Year: 2015

The ability to simulate aerodynamic flows using CFD methods has progressed rapidly over the last decades and has given rise to a change in design processes in aeronautics already. But more improvement is necessary to overcome the (still) existing lack in confidence in CFD usage, based on turbulence modelling. The TILDA project will offer methods and approaches combining advanced and efficient high-order numerical schemes (HOMs) with innovative approaches for LES and DNS in order to resolve all relevant flow features on tens of thousands of processors in order to get close to a full LES/DNS solution for 1billion degrees-of-freedom (DOF) not exceeding turn-around times of a few days. The TILDA project will provide both an improved physical knowledge and more accurate predictions of non-linear, unsteady flows near borders of the flight envelope - which will directly contribute to an enhanced reliability. The main highly innovative objectives, targeting at industrial needs read: Advance methods to accelerate HOM for unsteady turbulence simulations on unstructured grids. Advance methods to accelerate LES and future DNS methodology by multilevel, adaptive, fractal and similar approaches on unstructured grids. Use existent large scale HPC networks to enable industrial applications of LES/DNS close(r) to daily practice. Compact high-order methods offer a very high ratio between computational work per DOF combined to a low data dependency stencil, making these methods extremely well adapted for shared-memory parallel processors, and allow for efficient redistribution over an increased number of processors. Provide grid generation methods for HOM on unstructured grids with emphasis on valid curvilinear meshes for complex geometries, and accounting for mesh and solution quality. Provide suitable I/O and interactive co- and post-processing tools for large datasets. Demonstration of multi-disciplinary capabilities of HOM for LES in the area of aero-acoustics.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.7.3.3 | Award Amount: 3.50M | Year: 2013

The project proposal InFluENCE aims at improving the fundamental understanding and control of interfaces of a battery type based on Li-ion and Na-ion active materials: semi solid flow batteries (SSFB). The fact that the case study will be a SSFB set-up instead of classic lithium ion batteries is an asset, given that the methods and techniques developed are generic and could as well be implemented for conventional Li- and Na-ion systems for the techniques that are not concentrated on flow aspects. A main objective is the investigation and optimization of the interfaces developing between the electrolyte and the electrochemically active material particles in fluid electrodes. The acquired knowledge would allow the chemical and morphological optimization of active materials as well as the design of optimized interfacial layers (also called artificial Solid Electrolyte Interfaces, art-SEI) capable of warrant stable interfaces. A second main objective is the understanding and control the mechanical and conductive behaviours of the slurries. For this, it is necessary to determine the role of shape anisotropy and the overall nature (attractive or repulsive) of the short ranged interactions of the active materials besides the strength of the attractive forces for conductive nano-particles. The cross interaction should allow intimate contact between active material and the conductive particles. The experimental work is accompanied by thorough modelling to understand the physical phenomena occurring at the microscopic scale, to derive scaling rules towards macro-scale and to enable design recommendations leading to optimal interface behaviour (size of anodic and cathodic compartments, geometry of collectors, etc.).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-01-2014 | Award Amount: 5.92M | Year: 2015

The Gluco-Psychosocial Axis (GPA) concerns the interplay of factors determining glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity and the neuroendocrine response resulting from exposure to psychosocial stress. A sub-optimal GPA influences the development of type 2 diabetes and related impairments with varying degrees of interplay between genetics and early growth (particularly adiposity and cognitive function), and social, occupational, and other modifiable lifestyle factors. Many exposures apply from throughout life, and potential exposure to a sub-optimal GPA lead to a cumulative risk of ill health and decreased economic prospects for the ageing. Understanding these factors, interactions and extent they contribute to the preservation of glucose homeostasis and psychosocial functioning is important for the development of preventive and therapeutic measures promoting healthy and active ageing. DynaHEALTH will contribute to implementing a dynamic model for early GPA risk identification and validation, allowing development of risk-based prevention tools and policies that will help to inform policy makers on the best periods to invest in cost-effective and sustainable healthcare strategies. DynaHEALTH comprises 13 partners from academic/private sectors and will leverage data from 21 birth cohorts and intervention studies, involving 1.5 million Europeans. By identifying biological and psychosocial determinants of the GPA and characterising metabolic and epigenetic factors, whilst quantifying the impact of exposure to an optimal lifelong GPA, DynaHEALTH will influence weight gain, glucose homeostasis, employability, health deterioration and disease accumulation as individuals age. DynaHEALTH includes the potential to exploit the results for new technologies and strategies, adding to our understanding of pathways related to healthy and active ageing, underpinning options for targeted, personalised healthcare and mitigating the effects of sub-optimal GPA on ageing.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SPA.2012.2.1-01 | Award Amount: 2.50M | Year: 2013

The international community of planetary science and exploration has launched, landed and operated dozens of human and robotic missions to the planets and the Moon. They have collected various surface imagery that has only been partially utilized for further scientific application purposes. Few attempts have been made so far to bring these data into a unified spatial context, or to exploit spatial relationships implicit in these images, including orbiter data. PRoViDE will assemble a major portion of the imaging data gathered so far from vehicles and probes on planetary surfaces into a unique database, bringing them into a spatial context and providing access to a complete set of 3D vision products. Processing is complemented by a multi-resolution visualization engine that combines various levels of detail for a seamless and immersive real-time access to dynamically rendered 3D scene representations. PRoViDE aims to (1) complete relevant 3D vision processing of planetary surface missions, such as Surveyor, Viking, Pathfinder, MER, MSL, Phoenix, Huygens, and Lunar ground-level panoramas & stereoscopic & multiscopic images from Apollo and Russian Lunokhod and selected Luna missions (2) provide highest resolution & accuracy remote sensing (orbital) vision data processing results for these sites to embed the robotic imagery and its products into spatial planetary context, (3) collect 3D Vision processing and remote sensing products within a single coherent spatial data base, (4) realize seamless fusion between orbital and ground vision data, (5) demonstrate the potential of planetary surface vision data by maximising image quality visualisation in 3D publishing platform , (6) collect and formulate use cases for novel scientific application scenarios exploiting the newly introduced spatial relationships and presentation, (7) demonstrate the concepts for MSL, (9) realize on-line dissemination of key data & its presentation by means of a web-based GIS and rendering tool


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.6.1.1 | Award Amount: 4.10M | Year: 2013

The main objective of the proposed project is to develop a generic UCG-CCS site characterisation workflow, and the accompanying technologies, which would address the dilemma faced by the proponents of reactor zone CO2 storage, and offer technological solutions to source sink mismatch issues that are likely to be faced in many coalfields. This objective will be achieved through integrated research into the field based technology knowledge gaps, such as cavity progression and geomechanics, potential groundwater contamination and subsidence impacts, together with research into process engineering solutions in order to assess the role/impact of site specific factors (coal type, depth/pressure, thickness, roof and floor rock strata, hydrology) and selected reagents on the operability of a given CO2 emission mitigation option in a coalfield. CO2 storage capacity on site for European and international UCG resources will be assessed and CO2 mitigation technologies based on end use of produced synthetic gas will be evaluated. The technology options identified will be evaluated with respect to local and full chain Life Cycle environmental impacts and costs. The project takes a radical and holistic approach to coupled UCG-CCS, and thus the site selection criteria for the coupled process, considering different end-uses of the produced synthetic gas, covering other options beyond power generation, and will evaluate novel approaches to UCG reagent use in order to optimise the whole process. This approach aims at minimising the need for on-site CO2 storage capacity as well as maximising the economic yield of UCG through value added end products, as well as power generation, depending on the local coalfield and geological conditions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CS | Phase: JTI-CS-2013-1-SAGE-06-004 | Award Amount: 1.29M | Year: 2013

The SAGE6 demonstration project aims to develop and mature a lean burn combustion system. An essential enabler to development of such technology is an accurate and reliable computational tool for prediction of emissions. Lean burn provides significant benefits in terms of NOx emissions. However, the emissions of CO, UHC and soot limit the operation of the combustor at different conditions. Reliable predictions of emission trends will lead to optimised combustor designs in a cost effective way. Todays capabilities, however, are still inadequate to produce accurate and reliable predictions in direct support of lean burn system design. The DREAMCODE project aims to develop and improve computational methods that can be used in the design process of low emission combustors. Improved models and methods will be developed to predict emissions accurately and reliably. To that end, the following essential elements of a CFD combustion emission tool will be considered: 1. Detailed chemistry models for jet fuel surrogates are necessary to describe the complicated chemical processes of fuel oxidation and emission formation in the gas phase. 2. Soot models are indispensable to describe the complex physical and chemical phenomena of soot particle formation. 3. Chemistry reduction methods are inevitable to reduce the computational cost of the complex chemistry model for application in CFD codes. 4. Spray break-up models are necessary to model the liquid fuel break-up, which has a dramatic effect on emissions. 5. Turbulence-chemistry interaction models have to account for the effects that occur on length scales which cannot be resolved by the computational mesh. These 5 models will be improved and integrated in a CFD code for the validation on real aero engine gas turbine combustors.


TRUST aims at conducting CO2 injection experiments at scales large enough so that the output can be extrapolated at industrial scales. It relies on four sites: the heavily instrumented sites of Heletz (Israel, main site) and Hontomin (Spain), access Miranga (Brazil) and the emerging site in the Baltic Sea region. The objectives are to: carry out CO2 injection with different strategies, displaying characteristics representative of the large scale storage and with injection volumes that will produce extrapolable reservoir responses; Develop, use and implement characterization and MMV technologies for maximized safety and minimized risks, including real time visualization of the CO2 containment and detection of possible failures; Develop optimal injection strategies that maintain realistic figures of injectivity, and capacity while simultaneously optimizing the use of energy; Detect and mitigate CO2 leakage at an abandoned well; Produce comprehensive datasets for model verification and validation; Improve the predictive capacity and performance of computational models, as well as their capability to handle uncertainty and thermo-hydro-mechanical and chemical phenomena at different scales (at the scale of the experiments) and upscaling (extrapolation to industrial scale) simulations; Address critical non-scientific issues of public acceptance, community participation, communication, dissemination, liabilities and prepare templates for the preparation and application of injection licenses and communication with regulators; Establish on-site facilities for analysis of monitoring and measurement, providing training and capacity building; Address the risk assessment in a meaningful way; Prepare a platform for the exploitation of project findings and for knowledge and information sharing with planned, large scale, CCS projects. Allow open access to sites, and seek cooperation with large scale CO2 injection projects both at the European and International levels.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IAPP | Award Amount: 2.17M | Year: 2013

The iBETTER project aims to join industrial and academic forces to develop a new prognostic methodology that predicts the useful life after a fault has occured in these bearings. Thirty researchers from the fields of tribology, condition monitoring and rolling bearing technology from two industrial and two academic partners will be seconded from one sector to the other, to implement a common research programme covering all relevant aspects of integrated diagnostic and prognostic models for rolling element bearings. The project has a balanced mixture of secondments (108 months, 29 people) and new recruitments (92 months, 6 people), and of experience level of the personnel involved. The collaborative programme is designed to allow researchers to exchange skills, knowledge and experiences and mutually benefit from each others expertise. In addition, the project partners will recruit 6 experienced reserachers specialised in numerical modelling, mechatronics,ferrography, statistics, and artifical intelligence to gain additional knowledge necessary for the research programme, and not currently present at the partners. The schedule of secondee visits and a special training and transfer of knowledge scheme were designed to match the work plan and to optimise synergies. Collectively, the consortium has the appropriate combination of analysis and process equipment to perform the work plan. Synergistic collaboration between sectors is crucial to achieve the objectives of iBETTER, which cannot be achieved on the basis of the knowledge present in each of the two sectors or at any one partner alone. Academic knowledge and fundamental understanding of the tribological principles and condition monitoring have to be combined with industrial know-how on bearing technology and requirements deriving from real-life applications in order to make iBETTER a success.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.5.2.1 | Award Amount: 5.20M | Year: 2014

Safety, reliability and controllability are essential elements influencing the public perception and licensing of CO2 storage. Therefore a thorough analysis of leakage mechanisms and threats to the safety and security of storage will be the first activity in the MiReCOL project. This will form the basis for an analysis of mitigation and remediation options. Both existing (state-of-the-art) and new remediation and mitigation techniques will be investigated, including laboratory tests of sealant materials and field demonstrations at the sites of Ketzin (Germany) and Beej (Serbia). Additional field experiments that cannot be afforded by MiReCOL only will be shared with top-ranked US and Australian partners. The approach in MiReCOL is strictly risk based, which ensures that the results of the project can feed into the regulatory process (protocols, safety regulations, guidelines). This means that the impact of each remediation and mitigation measure is assessed on all relevant risk levels. The results will be published both as handbook and as an interactive web-based tool, to inform both storage project operators and competent authorities on the options available for remediation and mitigation. The inclusion of industrial partners active in CO2 storage ensures the operational experience to assess the efficiency and impact of each measure.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-32-2014 | Award Amount: 3.00M | Year: 2015

Metabolomics is recognized as a crucial scientific domain, promising to advance our understanding of biology, physiology, and medicine. The emergence of high-resolution imaging mass spectrometry (HR imaging MS) opened doors to spatial profiling of hundreds of metabolites directly from tissue sections. However, clinical use of HR imaging MS is hampered by a lack of clinically-oriented bioinformatics tools for molecular interpretation of the complex and information-rich data produced. Our goal is to address this bottleneck. We will develop algorithms for high-throughput putative annotation of hundreds of metabolites, knowledge-based downstream analysis, and validation of biologically-relevant leads. We will create the METASPACE engine, an open online platform providing these tools integrated into validated workflows for clinical use. This engine will be evaluated in clinical case studies on metabolic phenotyping of tumor response to chemotherapy and polymicrobial infections in cystic fibrosis. This demonstration will raise awareness and build trust among potential end-users. METASPACE will create a research ecosystem for exploitation of spatial metabolomic data that benefits both academics and industry. An open-source approach will stimulate developments in this field and provide a sustainable platform capable of incorporating future bioinformatics. Our user-centred tools, linked to existing molecular databases, will enable researchers without mass spectrometry or bioinformatics experience to turn big and complex HR imaging MS data into molecular knowledge. A considerable outreach effort, alongside constant interaction with the clinical metabolomics community, will maximize impact and dissemination. By engaging and educating envisaged end-users, METASPACE will facilitate future clinical discoveries in studies that require untargeted metabolic profiling and imaging. Our project will drive innovation and create a novel bioinformatics research field centred in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-01-2014 | Award Amount: 5.98M | Year: 2015

Neuropathic pain (NP) is common (population prevalence of 7-8%) and will present a rising health burden in the future. NP results in significant morbidity, reduces quality of life and has a major deleterious impact on health in aging. The reason why some subjects develop neuropathic pain and others do not following the same injury is not known. The exact nature of risk factors for NP and their interaction are currently poorly understood and will be the focus of this project. We will establish an international consortium of leading researchers in the field of NP (DOLORisk consortium) involving members of established academic European consortia studying pain/genomics and neuropathy as well as the SMEs Neuroscience Technologies and Mentis Cura. The project will be highly translational and the starting point will be the study of patients with NP or at risk of developing NP. Specific objectives will be to: 1) Identify the influence of demographic factors, environmental/societal and clinical factors on the risk of developing and maintenance of NP 2) To apply modern genomics to validate (using a targeted approach) and find novel (using genome wide association) genetic risk factors for NP. 3) Use tissue samples and patient derived cells from Biobanks to validate of molecular pathways contributing to chronic pain in patients. 4) To determine if patient stratification using physiological (sensory profile, endogenous analgesic mechanisms and nerve excitability) and psychological factors can predict NP risk and progression. 5) Development of a risk model/algorithm for (severe) NP, combining measurable genetic and environmental factors. Our aim is to understand pain pathophysiology in terms of risk factors and protective mechanisms ranging from molecular pathways to societal impacts. The desired impact is to provide a firm platform to improve diagnosis and stratify patients according to risk profile, employ preventive strategies and ultimately develop novel therapeutics.

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