Immunotherapy Unit

Meldola, Italy

Immunotherapy Unit

Meldola, Italy

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Vallacchi V.,Immunotherapy Unit | Vergani E.,Immunotherapy Unit | Camisaschi C.,Immunotherapy Unit | Deho P.,Immunotherapy Unit | And 19 more authors.
Cancer Research | Year: 2014

Sentinel lymph nodes set the stance of the immune system to a localized tumor and are often the first site to be colonized by neoplastic cells that metastasize. To investigate how the presence of neoplastic cells in sentinel lymph nodes may trigger pathways associated with metastatic progression, we analyzed the transcriptional profiles of archival sentinel node biopsy specimens obtained from melanoma patients. Biopsies from positive nodes were selected for comparable tumor infiltration, presence or absence of further regional node metastases, and relapse at 5-year follow-up. Unsupervised analysis of gene expression profiles revealed immune response to be a major gene ontogeny represented. Among genes upregulated in patients with progressing disease, the TNF receptor family member CD30/TNFRSF8 was confirmed in biopsy specimens from an independent group of patients. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed higher numbers of CD30+ lymphocytes in nodes from progressing patients compared with nonprogressing patients. Phenotypic profiling demonstrated that CD30+ lymphocytes comprised a broad population of suppressive or exhausted immune cells, such as CD4+Foxp3+ or PD1 + subpopulations and CD4-CD8- T cells. CD30+ T lymphocytes were increased in peripheral blood lymphocytes of melanoma patients at advanced disease stages. Our findings reinforce the concept that sentinel nodes act as pivotal sites for determining progression patterns, revealing that the presence of CD30+ lymphocytes at those sites associate positively with melanoma progression. © 2014 American Association for Cancer Research.


Ridolfi L.,Immunotherapy Unit | Bertetto O.,Le Molinette Hospital | Santo A.,Borgo Trento Hospital | Naglieri E.,Italian National Cancer Institute | And 10 more authors.
International Journal of Oncology | Year: 2011

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with IL-2-dependent cell-mediated immunodeficiency. As IL-2 is the main lymphocyte growth factor, a phase III randomized multicenter trial was conducted to evaluate the impact of subcutaneous low-dose IL-2 added to standard chemotherapy (CT) on overall survival (OS) in advanced NSCLC patients. Patients (n=241) with histologically confirmed stage IIIb or IV non-operable NSCLC underwent stratified randomization on the basis of center, ECOG PS, stage of disease and percentage of weight loss. Patients received gemcitabine (1000 mg/m 2) on days 1 and 8 + cisplatin (100 mg/m 2) on day 2 every 21 days for a maximum of 6 cycles [chemotherapy (CT) arm]. In the CT+IL-2 arm, patients also received low-dose subcutaneous IL-2 3,000,000 IU/die on days 3-5, 9-11, 15-17. The study had 90% power to detect a 20% absolute increase in 1-year OS with 118 patients/arm. An overall response (OR) rate of 12.8% (14% in the CT+IL-2 arm and 11.4% in CT arm) was observed. Stable disease was 70 and 66.7%, and progressive disease 16 and 21.8% in the CT+IL-2 and CT arms, respectively. No differences in response were found in any subgroup analysis. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 1-year OS was 45% for the CT+IL-2 arm vs. 51% for the CT arm (p=0.456 log-rank). Median progression-free survival was 6.6 months in the CT+IL-2 arm vs. 6.9 months in the CT arm (p=0.573, log-rank). A higher number of grade 4 toxicities were reported with CT+IL-2. The most common grade ≥3 adverse events were gastrointestinal toxicity (mainly nausea and diarrhea) and myelosuppression. No relevant differences in clinical outcome were observed from the addition of IL-2 to CT. Future studies investigating the role of T-regulators in chemoimmunotherapeutic regimens could be performed.


PubMed | Immunotherapy Unit
Type: Clinical Trial, Phase III | Journal: International journal of oncology | Year: 2011

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with IL-2-dependent cell-mediated immunodeficiency. As IL-2 is the main lymphocyte growth factor, a phase III randomized multicenter trial was conducted to evaluate the impact of subcutaneous low-dose IL-2 added to standard chemotherapy (CT) on overall survival (OS) in advanced NSCLC patients. Patients (n=241) with histologically confirmed stage IIIb or IV non-operable NSCLC underwent stratified randomization on the basis of center, ECOG PS, stage of disease and percentage of weight loss. Patients received gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on days 1 and 8 + cisplatin (100 mg/m2) on day 2 every 21 days for a maximum of 6 cycles [chemotherapy (CT) arm]. In the CT+IL-2 arm, patients also received low-dose subcutaneous IL-2 3,000,000 IU/die on days 3-5, 9-11, 15-17. The study had 90% power to detect a 20% absolute increase in 1-year OS with 118 patients/arm. An overall response (OR) rate of 12.8% (14% in the CT+IL-2 arm and 11.4% in CT arm) was observed. Stable disease was 70 and 66.7%, and progressive disease 16 and 21.8% in the CT+IL-2 and CT arms, respectively. No differences in response were found in any subgroup analysis. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 1-year OS was 45% for the CT+IL-2 arm vs. 51% for the CT arm (p=0.456 log-rank). Median progression-free survival was 6.6 months in the CT+IL-2 arm vs. 6.9 months in the CT arm (p=0.573, log-rank). A higher number of grade 4 toxicities were reported with CT+IL-2. The most common grade 3 adverse events were gastrointestinal toxicity (mainly nausea and diarrhea) and myelosuppression. No relevant differences in clinical outcome were observed from the addition of IL-2 to CT. Future studies investigating the role of T-regulators in chemoimmunotherapeutic regimens could be performed.


PubMed | Immunotherapy Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology | Year: 2016

e18052 Background: Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) accounts for almost 80% of all lung malignancies, and 40% of these patients go on to develop brain metastases (BM). Furthermore, there are no grade 1 recommendations for the management of multiple BM. The most widely used treatment is whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Current data on pemetrexed suggest that it is active against BM. This drug was recently made available in Italy for front-line treatment of non-squamous NSCLC.In 2010 we observed 8 patients with central nervous system metastases from non-squamous NSCLC at diagnosis. Patients were treated with first-line cisplatin 75 mg/mWith regard to brain lesions, 5 patients had partial response (62.5%), 1 had complete response (12.5%), 1 showed stable disease (12.5%) and 1 had PD (12.5%). Only two patients were treated with concomitant WBRT, showing a partial response that continued during treatment and up to the final evaluation.Our data, although based on a relatively small case series, seem to confirm the activity of pemetrexed-based therapy against BM. If confirmed in a larger sample of patients, these results could modify the management of multiple BM by delaying radiotherapy in asymptomatic patients until PD occurs.

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