MORRIS PLAINS, NJ, United States
MORRIS PLAINS, NJ, United States

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Patent
Immunomedics, Inc. | Date: 2017-01-04

Disclosed are humanized RFB4 antibodies or antigen-binding fragments thereof. therapy of B-cell associated diseases, such as B-cell malignancies, autoimmune disease and immune dysfunction disease. Preferably, hRFB4 comprises the light and heavy chain RFB4 CDR sequences with human antibody FR and constant region sequences, along with heavy chain framework region (FR) amino acid residues Q1, F27, V48, A49, F68, R98, T117 and light chain residues L4, S22, K39, G100, V104, and K107. More preferably, the heavy and light chain variable region sequences of hRFB4 comprise SEQ ID NO:7 and SEQ ID NO:8, respectively. In certain embodiments, trogocytosis (antigen shaving) induced by hRFB4 plays a significant role in determining antibody efficacy and disease responsiveness for treatment of B-cell diseases, such as hematopoietic cancers, immune system dysfunction and/or autoimmune disease.


Severe glomerulonephritis involves cell necrosis as well as NETosis, programmed neutrophil death leading to expulsion of nuclear chromatin and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Histones released by neutrophils undergoing NETosis killed glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and parietal epithelial cells. This was prevented by histone-neutralizing agents anti-histone IgG, activated protein C and heparin. Histone toxicity on glomeruli was TLR2/4-dependent. Anti-GBM glomerulonephritis involved NET formation and vascular necrosis. Pre-emptive anti-histone IgG administration significantly reduced all aspects of glomerulonephritis, including vascular necrosis, podocyte loss, albuminuria, cytokine induction, recruitment and activation of glomerular leukocytes and glomerular crescent formation. Subjects with established glomerulonephritis treated with anti-histone IgG, recombinant activated protein C, or heparin all abrogated severe glomerulonephritis suggesting that histone-mediated glomerular pathology is a subsequent, not initial event in necrotizing glomerulonephritis. Neutralizing extracellular histones is therapeutic in severe experimental glomerulonephritis.


Patent
Immunomedics, Inc. | Date: 2017-02-01

Described herein are compositions and methods of use of anti-pancreatic cancer antibodies or fragments thereof, such as murine, chimeric, humanized or human PAM4 antibodies. The subject antibodies show a number of novel and useful therapeutic characteristics, such as binding with high specificity to pancreatic and other cancers, but not to normal or benign pancreatic tissues and binding to a high percentage of early stage pancreatic cancers. In preferred embodiments, the antibodies bind to pancreatic cancer mucins. The antibodies and fragments are of use for the detection, diagnosis and/or treatment of cancer, such as pancreatic cancer. The antibodies, such as PAM4 antibodies, bind to a PAM4 antigen that shows unique cell and tissue distributions compared with other known antibodies such as CA19.9, DUPAN2, SPAN1, Nd2, B72.3, and Le^(a )and Le(y) antibodies that bind to the Lewis antigens.


Patent
Immunomedics, Inc. | Date: 2017-02-24

The present invention concerns improved methods and compositions for preparing SN-38 conjugates of proteins or peptides, preferably immunoconjugates of antibodies or antigen-binding antibody fragments. More preferably, the SN-38 is attached to the antibody or antibody fragment using a CL2A linker, with 1-12, more preferably 6 or less, most preferably 1-5 SN-38 moieties per antibody or antibody fragment. Most preferably, the immunoconjugate is prepared in large scale batches, with various modifications to the reaction scheme to optimize yield and recovery in large scale. Other embodiments concern optimized dosages and/or schedules of administration of immunoconjugate to maximize efficacy for disease treatment and minimize side effects of administration.


The present invention concerns methods and compositions for treatment of HIV infection in a subject. The compositions may comprise a targeting molecule against an HIV antigen, such as an anti-HIV antibody or antibody fragment. The anti-HIV antibody or fragment may be conjugated to a variety of cytotoxic agents, such as doxorubicin. In a preferred embodiment, the antibody or fragment is P4/D10. Other embodiments may concern methods of imaging, detection or diagnosis of HIV infection in a subject using an anti-HIV antibody or fragment conjugated to a diagnostic agent. In alternative embodiments, a bispecific antibody with at least one binding site for an HIV antigen and at least one binding site for a carrier molecule may be administered, optionally followed by a clearing agent, followed by administration of a carrier molecule conjugated to a therapeutic agent.


Patent
Immunomedics, Inc. | Date: 2017-02-14

The present invention provides humanized, chimeric and human anti-CD19 antibodies, anti-CD19 antibody fusion proteins, and fragments thereof that bind to a human B cell marker. Such antibodies, fusion proteins and fragments thereof are useful for the treatment and diagnosis of various B-cell disorders, including B-cell malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In more particular embodiments, the humanized anti-CD19 antibodies may comprise one or more framework region amino acid substitutions designed to improve protein stability, antibody binding and/or expression levels. In a particularly preferred embodiment, the substitutions comprise a Ser9lPhe substitution in the hA19 VH sequence.


Disclosed herein are compositions and methods of use comprising combinations of anti-CD22 antibodies with a therapeutic agent. The therapeutic agent may be attached to the anti-CD22 antibody or may be separately administered, either before, simultaneously with or after the anti-CD22 antibody. In preferred embodiments, the therapeutic agent is an antibody or fragment thereof that binds to an antigen different from CD22, such as CD19, CD20, CD21, CD22, CD23, CD37, CD40, CD40L, CD52, CD80 and HLA-DR. However, the therapeutic agent may an immunomodulator, a cytokine, a toxin or other therapeutic agent known in the art. More preferably, the anti-CD22 antibody is part of a DNL complex, such as a hexavalent DNL complex. Most preferably, combination therapy with the anti-CD22 antibody or fragment and the therapeutic agent is more effective than the antibody alone, the therapeutic agent alone, or the combination of anti-CD22 antibody and therapeutic agent that are not conjugated to each other. Administration of the anti-CD22 antibody and therapeutic agent induces apoptosis and cell death of target cells in diseases such as B-cell lymphomas or leukemias, autoimmune disease or immune dysfunction disease.


Severe glomerulonephritis involves cell necrosis as well as NETosis, programmed neutrophil death leading to expulsion of nuclear chromatin and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Histones released by neutrophils undergoing NETosis killed glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and parietal epithelial cells. This was prevented by histone-neutralizing agents anti-histone IgG, activated protein C and heparin. Histone toxicity on glomeruli was TLR2/4-dependent. Anti-GBM glomerulonephritis involved NET formation and vascular necrosis. Pre-emptive anti-histone IgG administration significantly reduced all aspects of glomerulonephritis, including vascular necrosis, podocyte loss, albuminuria, cytokine induction, recruitment and activation of glomerular leukocytes and glomerular crescent formation. Subjects with established glomerulonephritis treated with anti-histone IgG, recombinant activated protein C, or heparin all abrogated severe glomerulonephritis suggesting that histone-mediated glomerular pathology is a subsequent, not initial event in necrotizing glomerulonephritis. Neutralizing extracellular histones is therapeutic in severe experimental glomerulonephritis.


The present invention concerns compositions and methods for detecting and identifying novel cancer genes. The technique involves in vivo fusion of human cancer cells and animal cells, preferably hamster stromal cells, to form hybrid human cancer-animal cells, followed by identification of genes that are overexpressed in the hybrid cells compared to normal or transformed animal cells. The novel oncogenes or their protein products may be utilized for detection and/or diagnosis of human cancer or for development of new cancer therapies targeted against the novel oncogenes or their expressed proteins.


Epratuzumab, a humanized anti-CD22 antibody, is currently in clinical trials of B-cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases, demonstrating therapeutic activity in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Thus, epratuzumab offers a promising option for CD22-targeted immunotherapy, yet its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. Here we report for the first time that epratuzumab promptly induces a marked decrease of CD22 (>80%), CD19 (>50%), CD21 (>50%), and CD79b (>30%) on the surface of B cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from normal donors or SLE patients, and of NHL cells (Daudi and Raji) spiked into normal PBMCs. Although some Fc-independent loss of CD22 is expected from internalization by epratuzumab, the concurrent and prominent reduction of CD19, CD21, and CD79b is Fc dependent and results from their transfer from epratuzumab-opsonized B cells to FcγR-expressing monocytes, natural killer cells, and granulocytes via trogocytosis. The findings of reduced levels of CD19 are implicative for the efficacy of epratuzumab in autoimmune diseases because elevated CD19 has been correlated with susceptibility to SLE in animal models as well as in patients. This was confirmed herein by the finding that SLE patients receiving epratuzumab immunotherapy had significantly reduced CD19 compared with treatment-naïve patients.

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