Immunology Research Area

Rome, Italy

Immunology Research Area

Rome, Italy
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Locatelli F.,Instituto Of Ricovero E Cura A Carattere Scientifico | Locatelli F.,University of Pavia | Merli P.,Instituto Of Ricovero E Cura A Carattere Scientifico | Pagliara D.,Instituto Of Ricovero E Cura A Carattere Scientifico | And 18 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2017

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an HLA-haploidentical relative (haplo-HSCT) is a suitable option for children with acute leukemia (AL) either relapsed or at high-risk of treatment failure. We developed a novel method of graft manipulation based on negative depletion of ab T and B cells and conducted a prospective trial evaluating the outcome of children with AL transplanted with this approach. Eighty AL children, transplanted between September 2011 and September 2014, were enrolled in the trial. All children were given a fully myeloablative preparative regimen. Anti–T-lymphocyte globulin from day 25 to 23 was used for preventing graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD); no patient received any posttransplantation GVHD prophylaxis. Two children experienced primary graft failure. The cumulative incidence of skin-only, grade 1-2 acute GVHD was 30%; no patient developed extensive chronic GVHD. Four patients died, the cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality being 5%, whereas 19 relapsed, resulting in a 24% cumulative incidence of relapse. With a median follow-up of 46 months for surviving patients, the 5-year probability of chronic GVHD-free, relapse-free survival (GRFS) is 71%. Total body irradiation–containing preparative regimen was the only variable favorably influencing relapse incidence and GRFS. The outcomes of these 80 patients are comparable to those of 41 and 51 children given transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling or a 10/10 allelic-matched unrelated donor in the same period. These data indicate that haplo-HSCT after ab T- and B-cell depletion represents a competitive alternative for children with AL in need of urgent allograft. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01810120. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.


Rosado M.M.,Immunology Research Area | Bernardo M.E.,Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu | Scarsella M.,Immunology Research Area | Conforti A.,Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu | And 12 more authors.
Stem Cells and Development | Year: 2015

Bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), endowed with immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties, represent a promising tool in immunoregulatory and regenerative cell therapy. Clarifying the interactions between MSCs and B-lymphocytes may be crucial for designing innovative MSC-based strategies in conditions in which B cells play a role, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rejection of kidney transplantation. In this study, we show that, both in healthy subjects and in patients, in vitro B-cell proliferation, plasma-cell differentiation, and antibody production are inhibited by BM-derived MSCs when peripheral blood lymphocytes are stimulated with CpG, but not when sorted B cells are cultured with MSCs+CpG. Inhibition is restored in CpG+MSC cocultures when sorted T cells are added to sorted B cells, suggesting that this effect is mediated by T cells, with both CD4+ and CD8+ cells playing a role. Moreover, cell-cell contact between MSCs and T cells, but not between MSCs and B cells, is necessary to inhibit B-cell proliferation. Thus, the presence of functional T cells, as well as cell-cell contact between MSCs and T cells, are crucial for B-cell inhibition. This information can be relevant for implementing MSC-based therapeutic immune modulation in patients in whom T-cell function is impaired. © 2015 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

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