Immunology and Infectious Diseases Research Unit

Mexico City, Mexico

Immunology and Infectious Diseases Research Unit

Mexico City, Mexico
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Mata-Marin L.A.,Herzzentrum Am Klinikum Links der Weser | Mata-Marin J.A.,Hospital Of Infectologia | Vasquez-Mota V.C.,Hospital General | Arroyo-Anduiza C.I.,La Raza National Medical Center | And 4 more authors.
BMC Research Notes | Year: 2015

Background: Influenza virus pandemics vary dramatically in their severity and mortality. Thus, it is very important to identify populations with high risks of developing severe illness to reduce mortality in future pandemics. The purpose was to determine the mortality-associated risk factors in hospitalized Mexican patients infected with influenza A/H1N1. Results: The risk factors associated with mortality were: male sex [odds ratio (OR) = 5.25, confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-28.95], medical attention delayed >3 days (OR = 9.9, CI = 1.51-64.52), anti-flu therapy delayed >3 days (OR = 10.0, CI = 1.07-93.43), admission to intensive care unit (ICU) (OR = 9.9, CI = 1.51-64.52) and creatinine levels >1.0 mg/dL when admitted to hospital (OR = 11.2, CI = 1.05-120.32). After adjusting for the effects of potentially confounding variables in a logistic regression model, delayed medical attention (OR = 13.91, CI = 1.09-41.42, p = 0.044) and ICU hospitalization (OR = 11.02, CI = 1.59-76.25, p = 0.015) were the only predictors of mortality. Conclusion: Early medical attention is essential for reducing the mortality risk in patients with influenza A/H1N1, while a requirement for ICU management increases the risk. © 2015 Mata-Marín et al.


PubMed | La Raza National Medical Center, Immunology and Infectious Diseases Research Unit, Hospital Of Infectologia, Hospital General and Herzzentrum am Klinikum Links der Weser
Type: | Journal: BMC research notes | Year: 2015

Influenza virus pandemics vary dramatically in their severity and mortality. Thus, it is very important to identify populations with high risks of developing severe illness to reduce mortality in future pandemics. The purpose was to determine the mortality-associated risk factors in hospitalized Mexican patients infected with influenza A/H1N1.The risk factors associated with mortality were: male sex [odds ratio (OR) = 5.25, confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-28.95], medical attention delayed >3 days (OR = 9.9, CI = 1.51-64.52), anti-flu therapy delayed >3 days (OR = 10.0, CI = 1.07-93.43), admission to intensive care unit (ICU) (OR = 9.9, CI = 1.51-64.52) and creatinine levels >1.0 mg/dL when admitted to hospital (OR = 11.2, CI = 1.05-120.32). After adjusting for the effects of potentially confounding variables in a logistic regression model, delayed medical attention (OR = 13.91, CI = 1.09-41.42, p = 0.044) and ICU hospitalization (OR = 11.02, CI = 1.59-76.25, p = 0.015) were the only predictors of mortality.Early medical attention is essential for reducing the mortality risk in patients with influenza A/H1N1, while a requirement for ICU management increases the risk.

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