Immunity and Infection Research Center

Vancouver, Canada

Immunity and Infection Research Center

Vancouver, Canada

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Freue G.C.,University of British Columbia | Balshaw R.F.,University of British Columbia | Balshaw R.F.,Simon Fraser University | Tebbutt S.J.,University of British Columbia | And 9 more authors.
BMC Bioinformatics | Year: 2012

Background: Biomarker panels derived separately from genomic and proteomic data and with a variety of computational methods have demonstrated promising classification performance in various diseases. An open question is how to create effective proteo-genomic panels. The framework of ensemble classifiers has been applied successfully in various analytical domains to combine classifiers so that the performance of the ensemble exceeds the performance of individual classifiers. Using blood-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection as a case study, we address the following question in this paper: Can acute rejection classification performance be improved by combining individual genomic and proteomic classifiers in an ensemble?Results: The first part of the paper presents a computational biomarker development pipeline for genomic and proteomic data. The pipeline begins with data acquisition (e.g., from bio-samples to microarray data), quality control, statistical analysis and mining of the data, and finally various forms of validation. The pipeline ensures that the various classifiers to be combined later in an ensemble are diverse and adequate for clinical use. Five mRNA genomic and five proteomic classifiers were developed independently using single time-point blood samples from 11 acute-rejection and 22 non-rejection renal transplant patients. The second part of the paper examines five ensembles ranging in size from two to 10 individual classifiers. Performance of ensembles is characterized by area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity, as derived from the probability of acute rejection for individual classifiers in the ensemble in combination with one of two aggregation methods: (1) Average Probability or (2) Vote Threshold. One ensemble demonstrated superior performance and was able to improve sensitivity and AUC beyond the best values observed for any of the individual classifiers in the ensemble, while staying within the range of observed specificity. The Vote Threshold aggregation method achieved improved sensitivity for all 5 ensembles, but typically at the cost of decreased specificity.Conclusion: Proteo-genomic biomarker ensemble classifiers show promise in the diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection and can improve classification performance beyond that of individual genomic or proteomic classifiers alone. Validation of our results in an international multicenter study is currently underway. © 2012 Günther et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Cohen Freue G.V.,University of British Columbia | Sasaki M.,Immunity and Infection Research Center | Meredith A.,James Hogg Imaging | Meredith A.,University of British Columbia | And 13 more authors.
Molecular and Cellular Proteomics | Year: 2010

Acute graft rejection is an important clinical problem in renal transplantation and an adverse predictor for long term graft survival. Plasma biomarkers may offer an important option for post-transplant monitoring and permit timely and effective therapeutic intervention to minimize graft damage. This case-control discovery study (n = 32) used isobaric tagging for relative and absolute protein quantification (iTRAQ) technology to quantitate plasma protein relative concentrations in precise cohorts of patients with and without biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (BCAR). Plasma samples were depleted of the 14 most abundant plasma proteins to enhance detection sensitivity. A total of 18 plasma proteins that encompassed processes related to inflammation, complement activation, blood coagulation, and wound repair exhibited significantly different relative concentrations between patient cohorts with and without BCAR (p value <0.05). Twelve proteins with a fold-change ≥1.15 were selected for diagnostic purposes: seven were increased (titin, lipopolysaccharidebinding protein, peptidase inhibitor 16, complement factor D, mannose-binding lectin, protein Z-dependent protease and β2-microglobulin) and five were decreased (kininogen-1, afamin, serine protease inhibitor, phosphatidylcholine- sterol acyltransferase, and sex hormone-binding globulin) in patients with BCAR. The first three principal components of these proteins showed clear separation of cohorts with and without BCAR. Performance improved with the inclusion of sequential proteins, reaching a primary asymptote after the first three (titin, kininogen-1, and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein). Longitudinal monitoring over the first 3 months post-transplant based on ratios of these three proteins showed clear discrimination between the two patient cohorts at time of rejection. The score then declined to baseline following treatment and resolution of the rejection episode and remained comparable between cases and controls throughout the period of quiescent follow-up. Results were validated using ELISA where possible, and initial cross-validation estimated a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 90% for classification of BCAR based on a four-protein ELISA classifier. This study provides evidence that protein concentrations in plasma may provide a relevant measure for the occurrence of BCAR and offers a potential tool for immunologic monitoring. © 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.


Cohen Freue G.V.,University of British Columbia | Meredith A.,University of British Columbia | Smith D.,University of Victoria | Bergman A.,Immunity and Infection Research Center | And 14 more authors.
PLoS Computational Biology | Year: 2013

Recent technical advances in the field of quantitative proteomics have stimulated a large number of biomarker discovery studies of various diseases, providing avenues for new treatments and diagnostics. However, inherent challenges have limited the successful translation of candidate biomarkers into clinical use, thus highlighting the need for a robust analytical methodology to transition from biomarker discovery to clinical implementation. We have developed an end-to-end computational proteomic pipeline for biomarkers studies. At the discovery stage, the pipeline emphasizes different aspects of experimental design, appropriate statistical methodologies, and quality assessment of results. At the validation stage, the pipeline focuses on the migration of the results to a platform appropriate for external validation, and the development of a classifier score based on corroborated protein biomarkers. At the last stage towards clinical implementation, the main aims are to develop and validate an assay suitable for clinical deployment, and to calibrate the biomarker classifier using the developed assay. The proposed pipeline was applied to a biomarker study in cardiac transplantation aimed at developing a minimally invasive clinical test to monitor acute rejection. Starting with an untargeted screening of the human plasma proteome, five candidate biomarker proteins were identified. Rejection-regulated proteins reflect cellular and humoral immune responses, acute phase inflammatory pathways, and lipid metabolism biological processes. A multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass-spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay was developed for the five candidate biomarkers and validated by enzyme-linked immune-sorbent (ELISA) and immunonephelometric assays (INA). A classifier score based on corroborated proteins demonstrated that the developed MRM-MS assay provides an appropriate methodology for an external validation, which is still in progress. Plasma proteomic biomarkers of acute cardiac rejection may offer a relevant post-transplant monitoring tool to effectively guide clinical care. The proposed computational pipeline is highly applicable to a wide range of biomarker proteomic studies. © 2013 Cohen Freue et al.


Shin H.,St Pauls Hospital | McMaster W.R.,Immunity and Infection Research Center | McManus B.M.,St Pauls Hospital | Keown P.A.,Vancouver General Hospital | And 4 more authors.
OMICS A Journal of Integrative Biology | Year: 2014

Multi-omics research is a key ingredient of data-intensive life sciences research, permitting measurement of biological molecules at different functional levels in the same individual. For a complete picture at the biological systems level, appropriate statistical techniques must however be developed to integrate different 'omics' data sets (e.g., genomics and proteomics). We report here multivariate projection-based analyses approaches to genomics and proteomics data sets, using the case study of and applications to observations in kidney transplant patients who experienced an acute rejection event (n=20) versus non-rejecting controls (n=20). In this data sets, we show how these novel methodologies might serve as promising tools for dimension reduction and selection of relevant features for different analytical frameworks. Unsupervised analyses highlighted the importance of post transplant time-of-rejection, while supervised analyses identified gene and protein signatures that together predicted rejection status with little time effect. The selected genes are part of biological pathways that are representative of immune responses. Gene enrichment profiles revealed increases in innate immune responses and neutrophil activities and a depletion of T lymphocyte related processes in rejection samples as compared to controls. In all, this article offers candidate biomarkers for future detection and monitoring of acute kidney transplant rejection, as well as ways forward for methodological advances to better harness multi-omics data sets. Copyright © 2014 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

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