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Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Antibacterial Drug Resistance: Market Landscape, Challenges and Upcoming Opportunities, 2016-2026 " report to their offering. The "Antibacterial Drug Resistance: Market Landscape, Challenges and Upcoming Opportunities, 2016-2026" report provides an extensive study of the current landscape and the growing pipeline of new generation antibiotics targeting drug-resistant bacteria. As indicated earlier, owing to the over-prescription of antibiotics due to improper diagnosis, lack of adherence to proper dosage regimens, their widespread availability as over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, and overuse in agriculture and poultry farming, most antibiotics have been rendered ineffective. Moreover, there currently exists an expanding lag between the pace at which drug resistant bacteria evolve and the time taken for new drugs to reach the market. As a result, antibiotic drug resistance has escalated into a global threat. There are concerns that the lack of effective drugs in this domain may soon trigger the relapse of the pre-antibiotic era, in which individuals died due to day-to-day bacterial infections. According to certain studies, currently, an estimated 700,000 deaths annually are known to occur due to anti-microbial resistance worldwide. In future, the growing threat of antibiotic resistance is anticipated to prove to be more fatal than cancer. The current scenario depicts an urgent need for new antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action, having the ability to combat antibiotic resistance. The US and EU governments have amended their action plans and conducted many conferences to raise awareness about the situation among both experts in the domain and the general public. Such initiatives are addressed to support R&D strategies of companies engaged in the development of drugs to combat antibiotic resistance. Efforts are underway to assist drug developers in their clinical trial design issues, and even the simplification of regulatory pathways to expedite the time to market for such drugs. In addition, such initiatives endorse public-private partnerships in advancing scientific and clinical efforts in this domain, aid the setting up of surveillance programs to track the widespread use of antibiotics and the development of resistance, and track the growing economic burden due to this phenomenon as well. The new generation antibiotics pipeline comprises of several molecules that target infections caused by deadly pathogens classified under ESKAPE or as urgent threats by the CDC. Several start-ups have entered the market and undertaken various initiatives to develop novel antibiotics with unique mechanisms of action. - An overview of the current state of the market with respect to the key players involved, phase of development of pipeline products (clinical and preclinical/discovery), target classes of pathogens (Gram-negative versus Gram-positive), drug classes and key disease indications. In addition, we have included an insightful representation of the developer landscape, highlighting the geographical presence of key players in the industry. - Detailed profiles of approved drugs, as well as those in phase III of clinical development, highlighting information on clinical trials, their current status of development, recent developments and associated collaborations. - Insights on novel alternative therapies that are being explored/evaluated to target antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria; these include teixobactin, anti-microbial peptides, antisense antibacterials, quorum sensing inhibition, nano-metal based therapies and anti-biofilm agents. - Details on the most popular therapeutic areas, namely acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs), complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs), complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs) and hospital-acquired pneumonia/ventilator-associated pneumonia (HAP/VAP). For each indication, we have provided a brief description of the disease, information on its epidemiology, available treatment plans and active comparator studies of approved drug candidates that are prescribed for the aforementioned indications. - An illustrative grid representation and a bulls-eye analysis of the pipeline molecules, based on their development stage, spectrum of activity and the key indications. - Future commercial potential of the market based on a detailed opportunity analysis, for the period between 2016 and 2026. The research, analysis and insights presented in this report include potential sales of approved antibiotics and those in late stages of development. 1. Preface 2. Executive Summary 3. Introduction 4. Antibiotic Drug Resistance: Development Pipeline and Market Landscape 5. Clinical Development Analysis and Key Comparator Studies 6. New Generation Antibiotics: Marketed Drugs 7. New Generation Antibiotics: Phase III Drugs 8. Emerging Therapies to Combat Antibiotic Resistance 9. Key Therapeutic Areas 10. Market Forecast and Opportunity Analysis 11. Conclusion 12. Interview Transcripts 13. Appendix 1: Tabulated Data 14. Appendix 2: List of Companies and Organization - AAIPharma Services - ABAC Therapeutics - ANTABIO - Abbott Laboratories - Abgentis - Absynth Biologics - Achaogen - Acino Holdings - Actavis - Actelion Pharmaceuticals - Adenium Biotech - Adimab - Aequor - AiCuris - Alaxia Pharma - Albany Molecular Research (AMRI) - Allecra Therapeutics - Allergan - Angelini - Antibio Tx - Antibiotic Adjuvant - Aphios - Appili Therapeutics - Arietis Pharma - Arpida - Arsanis - Assembly Biosciences - AstraZeneca - Austell Laboratories - Aventis Pharma - BKG Pharma - BUGWORKS - Basilea Pharmaceutica - Bayer Pharma - BioVersys - Biocidium Biopharmaceuticals - Biocon - Biosearch Italia - Biovertis - Blueberry Therapeutics - C3 Jian - Calixa Therapeutics - Cantab Anti-infectives - Cardiome Pharma - Cellceutix Corporation - Cempra - Cerexa - Clinigen Group - ContraFect - Crestone - Crystal Genomics - Cubist Pharmaceuticals - CyDex Pharmaceuticals - DSM Sinochem Pharmaceuticals - Da Volterra - Daiichi Sankyo - Debiopharm International - Deinove - Demuris - Discuva - Dong Wha Pharmaceuticals - Dong-A Pharmaceutical - Durata Therapeutics - Eli Lilly - Eligo Bioscience - EnBiotix - Entasis Therapeutics - Eurofarma Laboratórios - Evolva Holding - Evotec - Eydo Pharma - FOB Synthesis - Fedora Pharmaceuticals - Forest Laboratories - Fujisawa Pharmaceuticals - GSK - Galapagos - GangaGen - GeneWEAVE - Hikma Pharmaceuticals - IASO Pharma - iNtRON Biotechnology - Immuron - Indel Therapeutics - Institute of Metagenomics and Microbial Technologies (IMMT) - InterMune - Ionis Pharmaceuticals - Isis Pharmaceuticals - Janssen-Ortho - Japan Radio Company - Johnson & Johnson - Kyorin Pharmaceutical - LegoChem Biosciences - Ligand Pharmaceuticals - Lyndra - MGB Biopharma - Macrolide Pharmaceuticals - MarBiLeads - Matinas BioPharma - MedImmune - Meiji Seika Pharma - Melinta Therapeutics - MerLion Pharmaceuticals - Merck - MethylGene - Microbecide - MicuRx Pharmaceuticals - Mirati Therapeutics - Monash University - MorphoSys - Morphochem - Motif Bio - Mutabilis - Nabriva Therapeutics - Naicon - NanoSafe Coatings - Nanotherapeutics - Navigen Pharmaceuticals - Nemesis Bioscience - Nexgen Biosciences - Nobelex Biotech - Northeastern University - Northern Antibiotics - Nosopharm - NovaBiotics - NovaDigm Therapeutics - Novexel - NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals - Nuprim - OJ-Bio - Optimer Biotechnology - Optimer Pharmaceuticals - Osel - PENDOPHARM - Pacific Beach BioSciences - Par Pharmaceutical - Paratek Pharmaceuticals - Patheon - Peninsula Pharmaceuticals - Peptilogics - Pfizer - Pherecydes Pharma - Phico Therapeutics - Polyphor - Procarta Biosystems - Pure Actives - R-Pharm - RQx Pharmaceuticals - RaQualia Pharma - Rebiotix - Redx Pharma - Rempex Pharmaceuticals - RexC Pharmaceuticals - Rib-X Pharmaceuticals - Roche - Rx3 Pharmaceuticals - Sanofi-Aventis - SciClone Pharmaceuticals - Sequella - Seres Therapeutics - SetLance - Shionogi - Shire - SinSa Labs - Specialised Therapeutics Australia - Spero Therapeutics - Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma (DSP) - Summit Therapeutics - Synamp Pharmaceuticals - Synthetic Biologics - TAXIS Pharmaceuticals - TaiGen Biotechnology - Takeda Pharmaceutical - Talon Pharmaceuticals - Targanta Therapeutics - TechnoPhage - Techulon - Tetraphase Pharmaceuticals - The Medicines Company - TheraBor Pharmaceuticals - Theravance Biopharma - Treat Systems - Trius Therapeutics - University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute - University of Pittsburgh - Vaxdyn - VenatoRx Pharmaceuticals - Versicor Pharmaceuticals - VibioSphen - Vicuron Pharmaceuticals - ViroPharma - Vitas Pharma - Vyome Biosciences - Wakunaga Pharmaceutical - Warner Chillcott - Wockhardt - Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical - Zavante Therapeutics For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/gqv9bz/antibacterial


Dublin, Dec. 15, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Antibacterial Drug Resistance: Market Landscape, Challenges and Upcoming Opportunities, 2016-2026 " report to their offering. The "Antibacterial Drug Resistance: Market Landscape, Challenges and Upcoming Opportunities, 2016-2026" report provides an extensive study of the current landscape and the growing pipeline of new generation antibiotics targeting drug-resistant bacteria. As indicated earlier, owing to the over-prescription of antibiotics due to improper diagnosis, lack of adherence to proper dosage regimens, their widespread availability as over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, and overuse in agriculture and poultry farming, most antibiotics have been rendered ineffective. Moreover, there currently exists an expanding lag between the pace at which drug resistant bacteria evolve and the time taken for new drugs to reach the market. As a result, antibiotic drug resistance has escalated into a global threat. There are concerns that the lack of effective drugs in this domain may soon trigger the relapse of the pre-antibiotic era, in which individuals died due to day-to-day bacterial infections. According to certain studies, currently, an estimated 700,000 deaths annually are known to occur due to anti-microbial resistance worldwide. In future, the growing threat of antibiotic resistance is anticipated to prove to be more fatal than cancer. The current scenario depicts an urgent need for new antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action, having the ability to combat antibiotic resistance. The US and EU governments have amended their action plans and conducted many conferences to raise awareness about the situation among both experts in the domain and the general public. Such initiatives are addressed to support R&D strategies of companies engaged in the development of drugs to combat antibiotic resistance. Efforts are underway to assist drug developers in their clinical trial design issues, and even the simplification of regulatory pathways to expedite the time to market for such drugs. In addition, such initiatives endorse public-private partnerships in advancing scientific and clinical efforts in this domain, aid the setting up of surveillance programs to track the widespread use of antibiotics and the development of resistance, and track the growing economic burden due to this phenomenon as well. The new generation antibiotics pipeline comprises of several molecules that target infections caused by deadly pathogens classified under ESKAPE or as urgent threats by the CDC. Several start-ups have entered the market and undertaken various initiatives to develop novel antibiotics with unique mechanisms of action. The report features: - An overview of the current state of the market with respect to the key players involved, phase of development of pipeline products (clinical and preclinical/discovery), target classes of pathogens (Gram-negative versus Gram-positive), drug classes and key disease indications. In addition, we have included an insightful representation of the developer landscape, highlighting the geographical presence of key players in the industry. - Detailed profiles of approved drugs, as well as those in phase III of clinical development, highlighting information on clinical trials, their current status of development, recent developments and associated collaborations. - Insights on novel alternative therapies that are being explored/evaluated to target antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria; these include teixobactin, anti-microbial peptides, antisense antibacterials, quorum sensing inhibition, nano-metal based therapies and anti-biofilm agents. - Details on the most popular therapeutic areas, namely acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs), complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs), complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs) and hospital-acquired pneumonia/ventilator-associated pneumonia (HAP/VAP). For each indication, we have provided a brief description of the disease, information on its epidemiology, available treatment plans and active comparator studies of approved drug candidates that are prescribed for the aforementioned indications. - An illustrative grid representation and a bulls-eye analysis of the pipeline molecules, based on their development stage, spectrum of activity and the key indications. - Future commercial potential of the market based on a detailed opportunity analysis, for the period between 2016 and 2026. The research, analysis and insights presented in this report include potential sales of approved antibiotics and those in late stages of development. Key Topics Covered: 1. Preface 2. Executive Summary 3. Introduction 4. Antibiotic Drug Resistance: Development Pipeline and Market Landscape 5. Clinical Development Analysis and Key Comparator Studies 6. New Generation Antibiotics: Marketed Drugs 7. New Generation Antibiotics: Phase III Drugs 8. Emerging Therapies to Combat Antibiotic Resistance 9. Key Therapeutic Areas 10. Market Forecast and Opportunity Analysis 11. Conclusion 12. Interview Transcripts 13. Appendix 1: Tabulated Data 14. Appendix 2: List of Companies and Organization - AAIPharma Services - ABAC Therapeutics - ANTABIO - Abbott Laboratories - Abgentis - Absynth Biologics - Achaogen - Acino Holdings - Actavis - Actelion Pharmaceuticals - Adenium Biotech - Adimab - Aequor - AiCuris - Alaxia Pharma - Albany Molecular Research (AMRI) - Allecra Therapeutics - Allergan - Angelini - Antibio Tx - Antibiotic Adjuvant - Aphios - Appili Therapeutics - Arietis Pharma - Arpida - Arsanis - Assembly Biosciences - AstraZeneca - Austell Laboratories - Aventis Pharma - BKG Pharma - BUGWORKS - Basilea Pharmaceutica - Bayer Pharma - BioVersys - Biocidium Biopharmaceuticals - Biocon - Biosearch Italia - Biovertis - Blueberry Therapeutics - C3 Jian - Calixa Therapeutics - Cantab Anti-infectives - Cardiome Pharma - Cellceutix Corporation - Cempra - Cerexa - Clinigen Group - ContraFect - Crestone - Crystal Genomics - Cubist Pharmaceuticals - CyDex Pharmaceuticals - DSM Sinochem Pharmaceuticals - Da Volterra - Daiichi Sankyo - Debiopharm International - Deinove - Demuris - Discuva - Dong Wha Pharmaceuticals - Dong-A Pharmaceutical - Durata Therapeutics - Eli Lilly - Eligo Bioscience - EnBiotix - Entasis Therapeutics - Eurofarma Laboratórios - Evolva Holding - Evotec - Eydo Pharma - FOB Synthesis - Fedora Pharmaceuticals - Forest Laboratories - Fujisawa Pharmaceuticals - GSK - Galapagos - GangaGen - GeneWEAVE - Hikma Pharmaceuticals - IASO Pharma - iNtRON Biotechnology - Immuron - Indel Therapeutics - Institute of Metagenomics and Microbial Technologies (IMMT) - InterMune - Ionis Pharmaceuticals - Isis Pharmaceuticals - Janssen-Ortho - Japan Radio Company - Johnson & Johnson - Kyorin Pharmaceutical - LegoChem Biosciences - Ligand Pharmaceuticals - Lyndra - MGB Biopharma - Macrolide Pharmaceuticals - MarBiLeads - Matinas BioPharma - MedImmune - Meiji Seika Pharma - Melinta Therapeutics - MerLion Pharmaceuticals - Merck - MethylGene - Microbecide - MicuRx Pharmaceuticals - Mirati Therapeutics - Monash University - MorphoSys - Morphochem - Motif Bio - Mutabilis - Nabriva Therapeutics - Naicon - NanoSafe Coatings - Nanotherapeutics - Navigen Pharmaceuticals - Nemesis Bioscience - Nexgen Biosciences - Nobelex Biotech - Northeastern University - Northern Antibiotics - Nosopharm - NovaBiotics - NovaDigm Therapeutics - Novexel - NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals - Nuprim - OJ-Bio - Optimer Biotechnology - Optimer Pharmaceuticals - Osel - PENDOPHARM - Pacific Beach BioSciences - Par Pharmaceutical - Paratek Pharmaceuticals - Patheon - Peninsula Pharmaceuticals - Peptilogics - Pfizer - Pherecydes Pharma - Phico Therapeutics - Polyphor - Procarta Biosystems - Pure Actives - R-Pharm - RQx Pharmaceuticals - RaQualia Pharma - Rebiotix - Redx Pharma - Rempex Pharmaceuticals - RexC Pharmaceuticals - Rib-X Pharmaceuticals - Roche - Rx3 Pharmaceuticals - Sanofi-Aventis - SciClone Pharmaceuticals - Sequella - Seres Therapeutics - SetLance - Shionogi - Shire - SinSa Labs - Specialised Therapeutics Australia - Spero Therapeutics - Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma (DSP) - Summit Therapeutics - Synamp Pharmaceuticals - Synthetic Biologics - TAXIS Pharmaceuticals - TaiGen Biotechnology - Takeda Pharmaceutical - Talon Pharmaceuticals - Targanta Therapeutics - TechnoPhage - Techulon - Tetraphase Pharmaceuticals - The Medicines Company - TheraBor Pharmaceuticals - Theravance Biopharma - Treat Systems - Trius Therapeutics - University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute - University of Pittsburgh - Vaxdyn - VenatoRx Pharmaceuticals - Versicor Pharmaceuticals - VibioSphen - Vicuron Pharmaceuticals - ViroPharma - Vitas Pharma - Vyome Biosciences - Wakunaga Pharmaceutical - Warner Chillcott - Wockhardt - Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical - Zavante Therapeutics For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/gtt9s3/antibacterial


Jha B.B.,IMMT | Mishra B.K.,IMMT | Satpati B.,IMMT | Ojha S.N.,IT BHU
Materials Science- Poland | Year: 2010

Thermal ageing of various durations and at various temperatures was performed in order to understand microstructural changes associated with precipitation and coarsening of carbides in 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The severity of thermal ageing is expressed in terms of the Larson-Miller parameter (LMP). The microstructural examinations were carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques. A transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) were used to identify the carbide particles, and to analyse the shape, size and distribution of the precipitate phases. Influence of these precipitates on hardness degradation of the steel has been examined. The reasons for the variation in the microstructure and for the hardness degradation of steel arising from thermal ageing are discussed.


News Article | March 3, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

Scientists at the Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology (IMMT) found a new way to improve color, clarity and luster of red ruby — microwaves. Rubies are one of the world's most popular gemstones and this study could provide many owners a means to improve the look of their beloved stones. Published in Spinger's journal Applied Physics A, the study has shown that even if heat treatments were used in the past, this is the first time that scientists used microwave heating as a method to improve ruby's color. "Microwave heating, an unconventional method of fast thermal excitation, produces new results in gemstone like ruby," said Shubhashree Swain, author of the study. "The study provides a new vista for future workers in the area," he added. Usually, scientists use heat treatments to improve the color saturation, trading value and clarity of gemstones. As the technology improved, they applied chemicals or surface coatings, used beam irradiation and other sophisticated methods. This study proposes a new and cheaper means to improve the overall look of red ruby through the use of microwaves. This method has been proven useful in other materials as well; like metals, composites and ceramics. To test the new method, they collected rubies from Sinapali, Odisha in India and treated them in a microwave for a few minutes at 1,500-degree Celsius. To compare treated rubies in the microwave with those which were not treated, they used different techniques including X-ray diffraction, fluorescence spectrophotometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The researchers have found that the microwave method made improvements in the gemstone's color and structure. The reddish black color of the stone turned to light pink, which believed to be brought about by changes in the stone's chromium, titanium and iron elements. The microwave method has many benefits especially for the gemstone industry. It is an easier and less expensive way to treat gemstones than traditional heating. Aside from that, it provides uniform heating, it's an energy-saving method, and it's eco-friendly. "The overall results demonstrate for the first time the effect of fast heating like MW on the microstructural properties of the gemstone and various oxidation states of impurity elements in the natural ruby," the researchers concluded in the study.


News Article | March 4, 2016
Site: phys.org

Rubies are among the world's most popular precious gemstones, and are also used in high power switches and sensors. Most natural rubies are not uniform in colour, and sometimes blue patches can be seen in the red stone. This decreases the value of a stone. Heat treatments count among the first methods to have been used to improve the colour saturation, clarity and trading value of gemstones. Treatments such as high energy, lasers, applying different chemicals or surface coatings and particle or electron beam irradiation are some of the other methods that have been used on rubies so far. The research team at IMMT is the first to add microwave heating to the possible methods of treating red gemstones. This technique has already been successfully used for materials such as ceramics, metals and composites. They tested the technique on natural rubies collected from Sinapali in Odisha. These hexagonal prisms varied in size between 5 mm and 11 mm. The gemstones were placed in a basic 3 MW microwave furnace, and treated at 1500 degrees Celsius. The team then used various techniques to investigate and compare the microwaved ruby samples with untreated ones. These include X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrophotometry, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the microwave treatment led to visible changes in the gemstones' colour and structure. In particular, the rubies changed colour from reddish black to light pink. The researchers believe this subtle change in the stones' surface colour and the increase in clarity may be caused by changes in the included chromium, iron and titanium elements. Fewer defects, irregularities and impurities in the stones were also noted, among others because of changes in their atom layout and crystal structure. "Microwave heating, an unconventional method of fast thermal excitation, produces new results in gemstone like ruby," says Swain. "The study provides a new vista for future workers in the area." She adds that the use of microwave heating has many advantages for the gemstone industry. It is a quicker technique than conventional heating, and ensures uniform heating, which in turn can aid rapid product development. It is also an energy-saving and eco-friendly process. Explore further: Understanding the origin of rubies and sapphires to improve prospecting strategies More information: S. Swain et al. Microwave heat treatment of natural ruby and its characterization, Applied Physics A (2016). DOI: 10.1007/s00339-016-9703-9


Mohit K.,BIT | Rout S.K.,BIT | Parida S.,BIT | Singh G.P.,Central University of Jharkhand | And 3 more authors.
Physica B: Condensed Matter | Year: 2012

Ni xZn 1-xFe 2O 4 (0≤x≤1) powders were synthesised by the auto combustion method. The derived samples show well defined peaks of cubic spinal structure with space group Fd3m. The lattice parameter calculated increased from 0.8372 nm to 0.8429 nm with raise of Zn content. The average crystallite sizes were determined by using Debye-Scherer method and found to be in the range of 1823 nm. Microstructural analyses show the regular and uniform grain morphology. Raman analyses demonstrated that the peaks have symmetric and asymmetric stretching as well as symmetric bending. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate the structure and shows the changes in the tetrahedral and octahedral bond stretching. Photoluminescence measurements indicated intense emission in the wavelength range lie in blue-green region. The composition with x=0.2 showed highest intensity and explained on the basis of disordered cluster model. Dielectric analyses showed frequency sensitive behaviour in the low frequency region and frequency independent characteristics at high frequency side. The composition with x=0.2 showed highest dielectric constant and lowest dielectric loss in the studied frequency range. The ac conductivity showed a power law behaviour and conduction is explained on the basis of hoping mechanism. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Majumder S.,Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar | Mishra I.,Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar | Subudhi U.,IMMT | Varma S.,Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar
Applied Physics Letters | Year: 2013

An enhanced biocompatibility from nanodot patterned TiO2 surfaces, fabricated by ion beam sputtering, has been observed here through its interaction with plasmid DNA. Investigations of the persistence length and the areal conformation of DNA show that the biocompatibility increases with ion fluence. Presence of nanostructures and increased surface roughness, in conjugation with higher oxygen vacancy sites that promote charge transfer from DNA moiety, are responsible for the increased hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of the patterned surfaces. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.


Chakraborty R.,University of Burdwan | Chatterjee S.,IMMT | Chattopadhyay P.,University of Burdwan
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry | Year: 2014

Nanocomposite titanium-phosphate (TiP) of different sizes was synthesized using Triton X-100 (polyethylene glycol-p-isooctylphenyl ether) surfactant. The materials were characterized by FTIR and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structural and morphological details of the material were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy. The SEM study was followed by energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis for elemental analysis of the sample. The important peaks of the XRD spectra were analyzed to determine the probable composition of the material. The average size distribution of the particles was determined by dynamic light scattering method. Ion exchange capacity was measured for different metal ions with sizes of the TiP nanocomposite and size-dependent ion exchange property of the material was investigated thoroughly. The nanomaterial of the smallest size of around 43 nm was employed to separate carrier-free 137mBa from 137Cs in column chromatographic technique using 1.0 M HNO3 as eluting agent at pH 5. © 2013 Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary.


Majumder S.,Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar | Paramanik D.,Japan National Institute of Materials Science | Solanki V.,Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar | Bag B.P.,IMMT | Varma S.,Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar
Applied Physics Letters | Year: 2011

Crystalline TiO2 nanodots have been formed on single crystal rutile TiO2 (110) surfaces via ion beam sputtering method by utilizing Ar ion beams from electron cyclotron resonance source. Nearly five times enhancement in absorbance of visible light, ∼5 times increase in luminescence, and ∼0.1 eV narrowing of bandgap are observed for nanodot-patterned surfaces, in the absence of any dopant material. Formation of crystalline rutile TiO2 nanodots and development of Ti interstitials on the TiO2 (110) surface, after ion beam sputtering, are responsible for these observations. Results suggest that these nanodot-patterned rutile TiO2 surfaces can become effective photocatalysts. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.


Parida K.,IMMT | Satpathy M.,IMMT | Mohapatra L.,IMMT
Journal of Materials Chemistry | Year: 2012

This present work highlights the successful preparation of the ternary series of (Mg/Al + Fe)-CO 3 layered double hydroxides with a constant ratio of Mg/(Al + Fe) = 2:1 and their application for photocatalytic hydrogen generation from water. At Mg/(Al + Fe) = 2:1, the Al:Fe ratio was varied from 1:4 to lower the concentration of iron in the synthetic gel, in order to get samples with different amounts of iron in the brucite layers, and to find out the role of iron in photocatalytic activity. The presence of a hydrotalcite structure in the catalysts was clearly demonstrated from the powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) pattern. The shifting of the diffraction plane d 110 towards lower angles clearly indicated the amount of Fe 3+ substitution in the brucite layer increases with increasing addendum (Fe 3+) concentration up to a certain limit and thereafter shows a decreasing trend. Further characterizations like Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) described the formation of amorphous Fe 2O 3 upon addition of a higher amount of Fe 3+ than the optimum amount that can be accommodated in the brucite layer. Other characterizations like UV-Vis DRS, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence spectra (PL) and X-ray photoelectron spectral studies (XPS) were performed to detect the efficiency of the catalysts towards H 2 evolution. Among all the prepared photocatalysts, LDH1(Mg/Al + Fe = 10:4 + 1), containing the highest amount of iron in the brucite layer, was found to be the most promising towards hydrogen evolution (301 μmol g -1 h -1) under visible light irradiation, which was attributed to the favourable surface structure and higher crystalline nature of hydrotalcites. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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