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My Friends House LA and LoveLife Foundation Join Forces to Host a Makeover for Displaced Moms in Honor of Mother’s Day On April 30th, My Friends House LA in conjunction with the LoveLife Foundation will host a special Mother’s Day event to salute seven moms in need. Their special “Mommy Makeover” day will start at 11am at the My Friend’s House Community Outreach and Imaging Center in Downtown Los Angeles (Skid Row community) located at 1244 E. 7th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90021. The center will be transformed into a spa-like setting which will set the tone for the day. The women will have time to rejuvenate and connect with other moms enduring similar situations. The selected women will have their hair groomed; receive manicures, pedicures, massages, make-up tips and consultations as well as have an opportunity to select a very special outfit to have and wear for this occasion. The day will continue with an empowerment message and a photo shoot allowing them to have a photo keepsake for lasting memories. Founder of the LoveLife Foundation, Raheem DeVaughn will serenade the mother’s with his melodic voice adding an extra special touch to this spectacular event. DeVaughn who will also be performing Saturday at the KJLH Women’s Expo proves to be a man of compassion. He along with his foundation has taken time out of their busy schedules to ensure these women have an unforgettable good time. To end this phenomenal day, the mothers will be escorted, by way of limousine provided by Norman Lewis to a local restaurant and will experience an evening of fine dining – all of which will be at no charge to them! “We are super excited about empowering these ladies and building their self-worth and esteem, making them feel beautiful inside and out!” stated Tiffany A. Rose, founder of My Friends House LA. This Mother’s Day celebration at the My Friend’s House Center follows the opening of their newly built Community Outreach and Imaging Centers, located at 1244 E. 7th Street, Los Angeles, Ca 90021, directly in the heart of Skid Row. With the financial support of sponsors, corporations and individuals, the two departments can restore souls with the impact of providing opportunities for relief. It is a place for those struggling to get back on their feet by meeting some of their needs that get overlooked such as, literacy on finances, appearances and styling for going on interviews, free counseling and access to computers for seeking employment and housing. Classes for health and nutrition is also offered. My Friend’s House Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit human organization who inspired by Matthew 25:35-40 has a mission to provide life sustaining staples that includes food, clothing, toiletries and spiritual motivation to the economically disadvantaged, regardless of race, color, creed, or religious belief. To date the foundation has served over 100,000 (an average of 250 per week) during their weekly outreach program held on Skid Row. The LoveLife Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit founded by three-time Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Raheem DeVaughn. Out of his genuine concern for the community and youth, Raheem established The Love Life Foundation to embrace several causes closest to his heart, with an emphasis on HIV/AIDS, domestic violence, mental illness, autism, cancer, education, music and the arts. Their mission is to improve lives through social development, education, and health and wellness by collaborating with community organizations and foundations to raise awareness and tackle issues that affect our communities. Los Angeles, CA, April 26, 2017 --( PR.com )-- My Friends House LA in conjunction with the LoveLife Foundation will host a special Mother’s Day event to salute seven moms in need. Their special “Mommy Makeover” day will start at 11am at the My Friend’s House Community Outreach and Imaging Center in Downtown Los Angeles (Skid Row community) located at 1244 E. 7th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90021.The center will be transformed into a spa-like setting which will set the tone for the day. The women will have time to rejuvenate and connect with other moms enduring similar situations. The selected women will have their hair groomed; receive manicures, pedicures, massages, make-up tips and consultations as well as have an opportunity to select a very special outfit to have and wear for this occasion. The day will continue with an empowerment message and a photo shoot allowing them to have a photo keepsake for lasting memories.Founder of the LoveLife Foundation, Raheem DeVaughn will serenade the mother’s with his melodic voice adding an extra special touch to this spectacular event.DeVaughn who will also be performing Saturday at the KJLH Women’s Expo proves to be a man of compassion. He along with his foundation has taken time out of their busy schedules to ensure these women have an unforgettable good time.To end this phenomenal day, the mothers will be escorted, by way of limousine provided by Norman Lewis to a local restaurant and will experience an evening of fine dining – all of which will be at no charge to them!“We are super excited about empowering these ladies and building their self-worth and esteem, making them feel beautiful inside and out!” stated Tiffany A. Rose, founder of My Friends House LA.This Mother’s Day celebration at the My Friend’s House Center follows the opening of their newly built Community Outreach and Imaging Centers, located at 1244 E. 7th Street, Los Angeles, Ca 90021, directly in the heart of Skid Row. With the financial support of sponsors, corporations and individuals, the two departments can restore souls with the impact of providing opportunities for relief. It is a place for those struggling to get back on their feet by meeting some of their needs that get overlooked such as, literacy on finances, appearances and styling for going on interviews, free counseling and access to computers for seeking employment and housing. Classes for health and nutrition is also offered.My Friend’s House Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit human organization who inspired by Matthew 25:35-40 has a mission to provide life sustaining staples that includes food, clothing, toiletries and spiritual motivation to the economically disadvantaged, regardless of race, color, creed, or religious belief. To date the foundation has served over 100,000 (an average of 250 per week) during their weekly outreach program held on Skid Row.The LoveLife Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit founded by three-time Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Raheem DeVaughn. Out of his genuine concern for the community and youth, Raheem established The Love Life Foundation to embrace several causes closest to his heart, with an emphasis on HIV/AIDS, domestic violence, mental illness, autism, cancer, education, music and the arts. Their mission is to improve lives through social development, education, and health and wellness by collaborating with community organizations and foundations to raise awareness and tackle issues that affect our communities.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

PMMC, a leading revenue cycle management company, helped JFK Health complete a successful first year in the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) program by providing bundled episode analytics and a collaboration strategy with its physicians to reduce spend and earn a repayment from CMS. PMMC provided JFK with actionable analytics so the organization could quickly evaluate spend performance among its post-acute care (PAC) providers and pinpoint the cost savings opportunities. By the completion of the first year, JFK Health finished $242,000 under the episode spend target and earned a repayment of $171,000 from CMS after the stop-gain limit was applied. “The data is what provides the insight for the hospitals to make decisions to hit the targets,” explained Steve Miller, Director of Managed Care at JFK. “We quickly realized by drilling the data down to the Service level that Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNF) were a cost strain. The PMMC model allowed us to identify the “sweet spot” between SNF length of stay and exceeding the stop gain”.” JFK Health decreased its length of stay by more than 50 percent -- from 21 to 10 days. The model, which requires hospitals to manage spend across the entire episode of care, is uncharted territory for many providers. An inherent challenge in this model is the need to build collaboration among the hospital and its physicians. To help build this collaboration strategy, PMMC consulted with the physicians at JFK Health. By presenting a transparent, third-party perspective supported by data, JFK’s physicians responded positively. “The relationship with a third-party like PMMC is unquantifiable. It made the process more transparent and really solidified the message of the need for collaboration,” added Steve Miller. Going forward into the second year of the program, JFK Health envisions its physicians being more engaged and taking more of a leadership role. JFK Health is one of approximately 800 hospitals required to participate in the CJR model, a five-year program intended to hold hospitals financially accountable for the quality and cost of a CJR episode of care and incentivizes increased coordination of care among hospitals, physicians, and post-acute care providers. With PMMC’s bundled episode analytics, hospitals can easily compare its own costs for the entire episode to CMS targets – as well as internal benchmarks – on a quarterly basis. PMMC provides high value revenue cycle software and services to improve the financial performance of healthcare organizations. Our software and expertise focuses on payment accuracy and identifying more revenue opportunities across the revenue cycle. PMMC helps hospitals identify underpayments and denials, increase price transparency, and manage bundled payments. Clients see, on average, a 10 to 1 return on investment with software and services. JFK Medical Center, an affiliate of JFK Health, is a 498-bed full-service, acute care hospital, and the adjacent JFK Johnson Rehabilitative Institute. Located in the heart of Edison, NJ, it has remained at the forefront of quality care in the region since its inception in 1967. Today, JFK accommodates more than 20,000 admissions, 3,000 births and 60,000 Emergency Room visits on a yearly basis. The Medical Center features a complete array of services, including general surgery, emergency medicine, mental health, orthopedics, maternity and pediatric care. It is home to two world renowned institutes: the JFK Neuroscience Institute and the JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Institute, as well as JFK Haven Hospice, JFK Imaging Center and the Center for Wound Healing. JFK Medical Center is proud to be rated the #1 stroke program in New Jersey and in the top 5% in the entire country. With a Gold Plus award for stroke care by the American Heart Association and a comprehensive and primary stroke center designation, our neuroscience program is unmatched with both neurological and rehabilitation services.


"My philosophy of care centers around providing personalized and customized care for each patient," said Adeoye, who served as an assistant team physician for the San Francisco 49ers, Golden State Warriors and Stanford football and athletic teams while a clinical fellow in sports medicine and arthroscopy at Stanford University. "By utilizing innovative techniques, I focus on taking a patient from injury and pain, back into an active lifestyle. This is extremely rewarding work and fulfills purpose in my life daily." Adeoye attended LA Sierra University where he graduated summa cum laude and received the Outstanding Senior Award for the highest departmental GPA from the Department of Physics. Additionally, he attended the Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania where he received his MBA and was a volunteer in the Wharton Healthcare International Program in South Africa. Adeoye completed medical school at the University of California in San Francisco where he served as chapter president of the Student National Medical Association. He completed his orthopedic surgery residency at Yale University New Haven Hospital where he was named chief resident. Adeoye is an associate master instructor for the Arthroscopy Association of North America and is board certified by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery. He is currently in practice at Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital. For more information or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Adeoye visit houstonmethodist.org/doctor/olusanjo-adeoye or call 281.737.0999. About Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine at Willowbrook Utilizing the latest research and state-of-the-art technology, Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine has become the leader in orthopedic care in Northwest Houston. Team physicians to high school and collegiate sports teams and sports clubs across Houston, the elite group of orthopedic surgeons - with subspecialties in foot and ankle, hand and wrist, hip and spine and sports medicine - collaborate with primary care sports medicine physicians and rehabilitation therapists to offer patients of all ages the least invasive, advanced treatment options available. About Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital is a 312 bed, not-for-profit, faith-based hospital, which is part of Houston Methodist. The hospital has expanded in Northwest Houston to serve the comprehensive health care needs of the growing community. Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital has been named a Magnet recognized health care facility by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®. Houston Methodist Willowbrook is ranked No. 8 in the Houston metro area and No. 19 in Texas by U.S. News & World Report as a "Best Hospital" in 2016. Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital specializes in cardiology and cardiovascular services, neurology, neurosurgery, orthopedics and sports medicine, and comprehensive cancer services. Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital has a Breast Care Center, Cancer Center, Imaging Center, Infusion Center Sleep Center, Surgical Weight Loss Center and operates the largest Childbirth Center in the Greater Northwest Houston area. For more information on the comprehensive services available on the Houston Methodist Willowbrook campus and to learn about upcoming events, please visit houstonmethodist.org/willowbrook. To find a physician, call 281.737.2500. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/olusanjo-adeoye-md-mba-joins-houston-methodist-orthopedics--sports-medicine-at-willowbrook-300459710.html


BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sync Project, Inc., a Boston-based company developing music as a personalized treatment across a range of conditions, is accelerating development of its physiologically-responsive music health platform. To date, Sync Project has raised $5 million in financing from investors Reid Hoffman, Greylock Partners (via Discovery Fund), Esther Dyson, David Shaw, Digital Garage, and PureTech Health. The company aims to validate interventions in both large-scale consumer experiments and controlled clinical studies in conditions such as stress, sleep, anxiety, and pain. “Developing music as precision medicine requires the right mix of people and funding that bridge consumer technology, music, and biotech,” said Marko Ahtisaari, CEO and Co-founder. “Our investors, advisors, and team are just such a mix. With the support of our investors, Sync Project is accelerating the development and validation of generative music for health.” “We are excited about the Sync Project team and how they are using artificial intelligence to create a new kind of personalized music that responds to your physiology to improve health,” said Reid Hoffman, partner at Greylock Partners. Sync Project is building a unique data set on the biometric impact (e.g., heart rate, brain activity, and sleep patterns) of certain structural properties of music (e.g., beat, key, and timbre). Datasets generated through Sync Project’s consumer initiatives will be further validated through controlled clinical trials in individuals suffering from sleep disorders, anxiety, and pain, among others. Sync Project aims to commercialize the clinical applications of this platform and deliver a personalized, low-cost, non-invasive therapy, across a range of conditions. Sync Project’s generative music platform is based on scientific research into the health effects of music. Recent research has shown that music can modulate neural systems like the dopamine response, autonomic nervous system, and other key pathways related to stress, movement, learning, and memory. This body of research shows that music affects some of the same neural pathways that are regulated by pharmaceuticals such as psychostimulants and suggests that music may hold significant therapeutic potential. Earlier this year, Sync Project launched unwind.ai, the first global experiment using algorithmically-generated music to potentially improve relaxation prior to sleep. Anyone with a smartphone can participate free of charge and contribute to a global data set on how music affects stress. Designed in collaboration with critically-acclaimed musicians, Sync Project’s generative music is personalized to an individual’s unique physiology. About Sync Project Sync Project is developing music as precision medicine. Sync Project’s generative music platform builds on scientific research into the health effects of music with a unique data set and machine learning that analyses musical attributes (like tempo and timbre) and their impacts on biometrics (like heart rate, brain activity, and sleep patterns.) Insights from Sync Project’s consumer initiatives will be further validated through controlled clinical trials in individuals suffering from sleep disorders, anxiety, and pain, among others. Sync Project aims to commercialize the clinical applications of their platform and deliver a personalized, low-cost, non-invasive therapy, across a range of conditions. Sync Project was co-founded by Marko Ahtisaari, Yadid Ayzenberg, Ketki Karanam, and PureTech Health (LSE: PRTC; www.puretechhealth.com). Sync Project’s advisors and Board comprise a distinguished and diverse team of science, music, health and technology experts committed to uncovering the untapped potential of music’s ability to improve health: Robert Zatorre, Ph.D., Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery at the Montreal Neurological Institute at McGill University; Adam Gazzaley, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the Neuroscience Imaging Center and Professor of Physiology, Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco; Tristan Jehan, Ph.D., Founding Chief Technology Officer of The Echo Nest (Spotify); Peter Gabriel, six-time Grammy Award-winning British singer-songwriter; Annie Clark (St. Vincent), award-winning American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist; Jon Hopkins, classically trained British pianist, critically acclaimed recording artist, Ivor Novello nominated composer of film scores, and prominent producer/collaborator; Esa-Pekka Salonen, Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor of the Philharmonia Orchestra in London and Conductor Laureate for the Los Angeles Philharmonic; and Board Members Joi Ito, Director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, Marjorie Scardino, DBE, FRSA, Chairman of the MacArthur Foundation, Board member of Twitter and former CEO of Pearson, Steven Holtzman, CEO of Decibel Therapeutics, and Daphne Zohar, Co-Founder and the Chief Executive Officer of PureTech Health. For more information visit syncproject.co or connect with us on Twitter @syncprojectco. Forward Looking Statement This press release contains statements that are or may be forward-looking statements, including statements that relate to the company's future prospects, developments and strategies. The forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results, performance and achievements to differ materially from current expectations, including, but not limited to, those risks and uncertainties described in the risk factors included in the regulatory filings for PureTech Health plc. These forward-looking statements are based on assumptions regarding the present and future business strategies of the company and the environment in which it will operate in the future. Each forward-looking statement speaks only as at the date of this press release. Except as required by law and regulatory requirements, neither the company nor any other party intends to update or revise these forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | May 28, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

You have three to five pounds of bacteria living in and on your body right now. That's some 38 trillion bacteria, researchers estimate. Your immune system has to manage all of them, sorting out the good from the bad bugs. "We have an amazing immune system to keep that all in check, and then to deal with pathogenic bacteria," says Catherine Leimkuhler Grimes, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Delaware. "It's fantastic when the system works, but also horrific when it doesn't." When a beneficial bacterium is mistakenly identified as a harmful one, the immune system's attack can trigger chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma, Crohn's disease and other disorders. Why this misidentification occurs is a mystery, but Grimes and her research team at the University of Delaware have invented a promising new method to literally help illuminate what happens. The advance is published in Nature Communications. Now back to that three to five pounds of bacteria we carry around... Much of the weight comes from the bacteria's cell walls, or "jackets," as Grimes refers to them. Firm, yet flexible, they are composed of peptidoglycan -- a mesh-like polymer made of protein (peptides) and sugar (glycan) molecules. Bacteria routinely slough fragments of their peptidoglycan jacket. When the immune system misreads these fragments and attacks healthy tissue, chronic inflammatory diseases can arise. But scientists have not had much of an eye into that process, until now. During the past four years, Grimes and her team have figured out how to label and light up the sugar backbone of the cell jacket -- the first lab in the world to do so. "We wanted to chemically make a new building block -- like a Lego with triangles on top instead of circles -- and then feed this material to the cell, which would use it to build its jacket without affecting anything else," Grimes explained. "Once the label was incorporated, we figured we could put 'flashlights' on it, which would help us to visualize the cell fragments and begin to identify immunostimulatory environments." No one had ever labeled the glycan like this inside bacteria before, Grimes said, noting that the approach comes from the relatively new field of bioorthogonal chemistry, in which chemical reactions are done in a living system without interfering with that system's natural processes. She continues to marvel at how her students -- both as individual scientists with unique strengths and as collaborators -- managed to clear every hurdle they met, even when the prospects of success seemed a bit dim. When the team hit a major roadblock early on, doctoral student Hai Liang saved the day, Grimes said. He had just read a recent manuscript from Christoph Mayer's laboratory at the University of Tuebingen, Germany, about how bacteria are natural recyclers. "Bacteria are very 'green,'" Liang said. "They actually expend a lot of energy to create this polymer -- peptidoglycan -- a nd they want its building blocks back." Liang told the team how Mayer's group had revealed two recycling enzymes, which Liang thought could potentially escort their chemically modified building block into the cell. But would the cell accept their slightly quirky building block with the triangles on top? Doctoral student Kristen DeMeester developed a synthesis to install bioorthogonal functionality (the "triangles") -- either an alkyne or azide -- onto the sugar building blocks and tested the response from the cells. The bacteria liked it and were given their flashlights. She also figured out how to make large quantities of sugars (glycan) as a feedstock. "Even while going for a jog, I would think about how to make these sugars faster," said DeMeester. "Now I can do it in a week, and I teach undergrads how to do it." Her process for making these compounds, and the UD method itself, are now patent-pending. To ensure their method was working, Grimes credits UD's Mass Spectrometry Facility for helping to tease out their peptidoglycan building blocks from the cell samples and find the fragment they were looking for. Jeffrey Caplan, director of UD's Bio-Imaging Center, trained the team on the high-powered super-resolution microscope, with its 3-D imaging capability, to see the flashlights they put on the bacterial cell wall. "The way Catherine and her team were directly labeling what they wanted to see, with nearly 100 percent specificity, was incredibly elegant and exciting," Caplan said. "We were actually seeing inside the cell walls, revealing individual molecules attached to the sugars." "Without Jeff, our findings would never have happened," Grimes said. "Jeff put the glasses on for us." But how do these labeled fragments affect the immune system? Enter collaborator Michelle Parent, associate professor of medical laboratory sciences at UD, and doctoral student Ching-Wen (Sandy) Hou, who works with macrophages -- cells that find and eat foreign bodies. When you grow human cells, you don't want anything dirty around. But a dirty incubator is exactly what Hou needed and used for culturing E. coli. After treating these cells with macrophages, she looked under the microscope and could see fragments of bacteria inside the macrophage, along with chunks of peptidoglycan. "We're hoping to see which fragment activates the immune response in the future," Hou said. The new UD method already is attracting new collaborators to the Grimes lab. A study with researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst focuses on Mycobacteria tuberculosis, which causes tuberculosis, while Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium that causes stomach cancer, is the target of a joint effort with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. To say that Grimes is proud of her research team would be an understatement. "To see these graduate students work together so seamlessly and not let their egos get in the way -- that's fantastic," Grimes said. "My colleagues at other universities ask, how did you get your students to work so well together? I think this was the best collaboration I've ever experienced." Making a positive difference, through science, for people around the globe who suffer from chronic inflammatory diseases is her team's ultimate aim, Grimes said. Finding better therapies and potential cures will take brainpower, tenacity and hard work. And that's not all. If you visit Grimes' office at UD, you're likely to see her lab's annual T-shirts hanging on the wall. Emblazoned across the back of the 2015 model is a line her lab lives by: "Trust your gut."


"We have an amazing immune system to keep that all in check, and then to deal with pathogenic bacteria," says Catherine Leimkuhler Grimes, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Delaware. "It's fantastic when the system works, but also horrific when it doesn't." When a beneficial bacterium is mistakenly identified as a harmful one, the immune system's attack can trigger chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma, Crohn's disease and other disorders. Why this misidentification occurs is a mystery, but Grimes and her research team at the University of Delaware have invented a promising new method to literally help illuminate what happens. The advance is published in Nature Communications. Now back to that three to five pounds of bacteria we carry around... Much of the weight comes from the bacteria's cell walls, or "jackets," as Grimes refers to them. Firm, yet flexible, they are composed of peptidoglycan—a mesh-like polymer made of protein (peptides) and sugar (glycan) molecules. Bacteria routinely slough fragments of their peptidoglycan jacket. When the immune system misreads these fragments and attacks healthy tissue, chronic inflammatory diseases can arise. But scientists have not had much of an eye into that process, until now. During the past four years, Grimes and her team have figured out how to label and light up the sugar backbone of the cell jacket—the first lab in the world to do so. "We wanted to chemically make a new building block—like a Lego with triangles on top instead of circles—and then feed this material to the cell, which would use it to build its jacket without affecting anything else," Grimes explained. "Once the label was incorporated, we figured we could put 'flashlights' on it, which would help us to visualize the cell fragments and begin to identify immunostimulatory environments." No one had ever labeled the glycan like this inside bacteria before, Grimes said, noting that the approach comes from the relatively new field of bioorthogonal chemistry, in which chemical reactions are done in a living system without interfering with that system's natural processes. She continues to marvel at how her students—both as individual scientists with unique strengths and as collaborators—managed to clear every hurdle they met, even when the prospects of success seemed a bit dim. When the team hit a major roadblock early on, doctoral student Hai Liang saved the day, Grimes said. He had just read a recent manuscript from Christoph Mayer's laboratory at the University of Tuebingen, Germany, about how bacteria are natural recyclers. "Bacteria are very 'green,'" Liang said. "They actually expend a lot of energy to create this polymer—peptidoglycan —a nd they want its building blocks back." Liang told the team how Mayer's group had revealed two recycling enzymes, which Liang thought could potentially escort their chemically modified building block into the cell. But would the cell accept their slightly quirky building block with the triangles on top? Doctoral student Kristen DeMeester developed a synthesis to install bioorthogonal functionality (the "triangles")—either an alkyne or azide—onto the sugar building blocks and tested the response from the cells. The bacteria liked it and were given their flashlights. She also figured out how to make large quantities of sugars (glycan) as a feedstock. "Even while going for a jog, I would think about how to make these sugars faster," said DeMeester. "Now I can do it in a week, and I teach undergrads how to do it." Her process for making these compounds, and the UD method itself, are now patent-pending. To ensure their method was working, Grimes credits UD's Mass Spectrometry Facility for helping to tease out their peptidoglycan building blocks from the cell samples and find the fragment they were looking for. Jeffrey Caplan, director of UD's Bio-Imaging Center, trained the team on the high-powered super-resolution microscope, with its 3-D imaging capability, to see the flashlights they put on the bacterial cell wall. "The way Catherine and her team were directly labeling what they wanted to see, with nearly 100 percent specificity, was incredibly elegant and exciting," Caplan said. "We were actually seeing inside the cell walls, revealing individual molecules attached to the sugars." "Without Jeff, our findings would never have happened," Grimes said. "Jeff put the glasses on for us." But how do these labeled fragments affect the immune system? Enter collaborator Michelle Parent, associate professor of medical laboratory sciences at UD, and doctoral student Ching-Wen (Sandy) Hou, who works with macrophages—cells that find and eat foreign bodies. When you grow human cells, you don't want anything dirty around. But a dirty incubator is exactly what Hou needed and used for culturing E. coli. After treating these cells with macrophages, she looked under the microscope and could see fragments of bacteria inside the macrophage, along with chunks of peptidoglycan. "We're hoping to see which fragment activates the immune response in the future," Hou said. The new UD method already is attracting new collaborators to the Grimes lab. A study with researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst focuses on Mycobacteria tuberculosis, which causes tuberculosis, while Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium that causes stomach cancer, is the target of a joint effort with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. To say that Grimes is proud of her research team would be an understatement. "To see these graduate students work together so seamlessly and not let their egos get in the way—that's fantastic," Grimes said. "My colleagues at other universities ask, how did you get your students to work so well together? I think this was the best collaboration I've ever experienced." Making a positive difference, through science, for people around the globe who suffer from chronic inflammatory diseases is her team's ultimate aim, Grimes said. Finding better therapies and potential cures will take brainpower, tenacity and hard work. And that's not all. If you visit Grimes' office at UD, you're likely to see her lab's annual T-shirts hanging on the wall. Emblazoned across the back of the 2015 model is a line her lab lives by: "Trust your gut." Explore further: Scientists sleuth out proteins involved in Crohn's disease


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Thomas Dickerson, Ed. D, FACHE, chief executive officer for Clinical Radiologists S.C., in Springfield, Illinois, is the new president of the Board of Directors for the Radiology Business Management Association, the largest and oldest U.S. association for radiology practice administrators. He succeeds outgoing Board President Jim Hamilton, MHA, CMM, FRBMA, an administrator and business manager for Medical Imaging Physicians, Inc., in Dayton, Ohio. Dr. Dickerson has been a member of the RBMA for close to 20 years and held positions on the RBMA Common Body of Knowledge Task Force and the RBMA Finance, Payor Relations and Executive committees. In addition, he has served on the RBMA Board of Directors as Treasurer and President-Elect. He was also a member of the executive search committee that helped select Bob Still as the RBMA’s new executive director in 2017. However, Dr. Dickerson has not just been a leader within the RBMA. He has also been a leader in the Springfield and Quincy communities. Between 2003 and 2013, he served Quincy Public Schools as an elected member of its Board. For six of those years, he was the school board president. He has also helped lead several local non-profit organizations. Professionally, Dr. Dickerson became CEO of Clinical Radiologists S.C. in 1998 and under his leadership, it has grown into a $100 million corporation with 80 physicians, making it one of the largest radiology practices in Illinois. He is also president of Professional Business Services of Central Illinois Inc., a medical billing company. Prior to his current positions, he was director of radiology services for Blessing Health System in Quincy, Illinois, and administrative director of Magnetic Imaging Center of Quincy, Inc. Dr. Dickerson earned his undergraduate degree in Advanced Technical Studies/Management at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. He then went on to receive a master’s degree in Human Resources at Ottawa University in Ottawa, Kansas. His doctorate in Education was awarded in 2014 from Creighton University. The new leadership role for Dr. Dickerson comes with new RBMA goals. “We’re seeing a big shift in health care and particularly in radiology,” he said. “We want to reshape the RBMA in response to technology, business trends and health care reform changes to ensure we’re here for the long haul for our members.” Interviews with Dr. Dickerson can be arranged through the RBMA. The full list of RBMA Board members is available at rbma.org/Board_of_Directors. About RBMA Founded in 1968, the Radiology Business Management Association is a national not-for-profit association providing members with applied business information and intelligence applicable in any radiology setting. RBMA represents more than 2,300 radiology practice managers and other radiology business professionals. Its aggregate influence extends to more than 24,000 radiologic technologists and 26,000 administrative staff and physicians. RBMA is the leading professional organization for radiology business management and is recognized for its radiology-specific educational programs, products and services, publications and data. The resources and solutions RBMA offers its members and the broader health care community are helping to shape the profession’s future.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

You have three to five pounds of bacteria living in and on your body right now. That's some 38 trillion bacteria, researchers estimate. Your immune system has to manage all of them, sorting out the good from the bad bugs. "We have an amazing immune system to keep that all in check, and then to deal with pathogenic bacteria," says Catherine Leimkuhler Grimes, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Delaware. "It's fantastic when the system works, but also horrific when it doesn't." When a beneficial bacterium is mistakenly identified as a harmful one, the immune system's attack can trigger chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma, Crohn's disease and other disorders. Why this misidentification occurs is a mystery, but Grimes and her research team at the University of Delaware have invented a promising new method to literally help illuminate what happens. The advance is published in Nature Communications. Now back to that three to five pounds of bacteria we carry around... Much of the weight comes from the bacteria's cell walls, or "jackets," as Grimes refers to them. Firm, yet flexible, they are composed of peptidoglycan -- a mesh-like polymer made of protein (peptides) and sugar (glycan) molecules. Bacteria routinely slough fragments of their peptidoglycan jacket. When the immune system misreads these fragments and attacks healthy tissue, chronic inflammatory diseases can arise. But scientists have not had much of an eye into that process, until now. During the past four years, Grimes and her team have figured out how to label and light up the sugar backbone of the cell jacket -- the first lab in the world to do so. "We wanted to chemically make a new building block -- like a Lego with triangles on top instead of circles -- and then feed this material to the cell, which would use it to build its jacket without affecting anything else," Grimes explained. "Once the label was incorporated, we figured we could put 'flashlights' on it, which would help us to visualize the cell fragments and begin to identify immunostimulatory environments." No one had ever labeled the glycan like this inside bacteria before, Grimes said, noting that the approach comes from the relatively new field of bioorthogonal chemistry, in which chemical reactions are done in a living system without interfering with that system's natural processes. She continues to marvel at how her students -- both as individual scientists with unique strengths and as collaborators -- managed to clear every hurdle they met, even when the prospects of success seemed a bit dim. When the team hit a major roadblock early on, doctoral student Hai Liang saved the day, Grimes said. He had just read a recent manuscript from Christoph Mayer's laboratory at the University of Tuebingen, Germany, about how bacteria are natural recyclers. "Bacteria are very 'green,'" Liang said. "They actually expend a lot of energy to create this polymer -- peptidoglycan --a nd they want its building blocks back." Liang told the team how Mayer's group had revealed two recycling enzymes, which Liang thought could potentially escort their chemically modified building block into the cell. But would the cell accept their slightly quirky building block with the triangles on top? Doctoral student Kristen DeMeester developed a synthesis to install bioorthogonal functionality (the "triangles") -- either an alkyne or azide -- onto the sugar building blocks and tested the response from the cells. The bacteria liked it and were given their flashlights. She also figured out how to make large quantities of sugars (glycan) as a feedstock. "Even while going for a jog, I would think about how to make these sugars faster," said DeMeester. "Now I can do it in a week, and I teach undergrads how to do it." Her process for making these compounds, and the UD method itself, are now patent-pending. To ensure their method was working, Grimes credits UD's Mass Spectrometry Facility for helping to tease out their peptidoglycan building blocks from the cell samples and find the fragment they were looking for. Jeffrey Caplan, director of UD's Bio-Imaging Center, trained the team on the high-powered super-resolution microscope, with its 3-D imaging capability, to see the flashlights they put on the bacterial cell wall. "The way Catherine and her team were directly labeling what they wanted to see, with nearly 100 percent specificity, was incredibly elegant and exciting," Caplan said. "We were actually seeing inside the cell walls, revealing individual molecules attached to the sugars." "Without Jeff, our findings would never have happened," Grimes said. "Jeff put the glasses on for us." But how do these labeled fragments affect the immune system? Enter collaborator Michelle Parent, associate professor of medical laboratory sciences at UD, and doctoral student Ching-Wen (Sandy) Hou, who works with macrophages -- cells that find and eat foreign bodies. When you grow human cells, you don't want anything dirty around. But a dirty incubator is exactly what Hou needed and used for culturing E. coli. After treating these cells with macrophages, she looked under the microscope and could see fragments of bacteria inside the macrophage, along with chunks of peptidoglycan. "We're hoping to see which fragment activates the immune response in the future," Hou said. The new UD method already is attracting new collaborators to the Grimes lab. A study with researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst focuses on Mycobacteria tuberculosis, which causes tuberculosis, while Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium that causes stomach cancer, is the target of a joint effort with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. To say that Grimes is proud of her research team would be an understatement. "To see these graduate students work together so seamlessly and not let their egos get in the way--that's fantastic," Grimes said. "My colleagues at other universities ask, how did you get your students to work so well together? I think this was the best collaboration I've ever experienced." Making a positive difference, through science, for people around the globe who suffer from chronic inflammatory diseases is her team's ultimate aim, Grimes said. Finding better therapies and potential cures will take brainpower, tenacity and hard work. And that's not all. If you visit Grimes' office at UD, you're likely to see her lab's annual T-shirts hanging on the wall. Emblazoned across the back of the 2015 model is a line her lab lives by: "Trust your gut." The project was supported by the National Institutes of Health-National Institute of General Medical Sciences through the Delaware COBRE and INBRE programs. Grimes also is a Pew Biomedical Scholar and a Cottrell Scholar.


Marines is certified by the American Board of Surgery and completed his fellowship training in this specialty at Rutgers University. He uses laparoscopic and robotic techniques for the treatment of colorectal diseases that result in decreased complications, less pain, better oncological outcomes, and faster return to work. "Now we have an option for ABL patients who haven't been candidates for other treatments or have not been satisfied with the results of other treatments," said Dr. Marines. "Current treatment options are very limited with many patients ultimately requiring a colostomy." The disease Accidental Bowel Leakage (ABL) affects an estimated 30 million people in the U.S. and Europe alone. ABL results from damage or weakening of the anal sphincter muscle. The impact of ABL on patients' quality of life is debilitating, causing absence from work, constant risk of embarrassment, and the inability to engage in routine activities. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Marines or to find a physician at Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital, call 281.737.2500. Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital is a 312 bed, not-for-profit, faith-based hospital, which is part of Houston Methodist. The hospital has expanded in Northwest Houston to serve the comprehensive health care needs of the growing community. Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital has been named a Magnet recognized health care facility by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®. Houston Methodist Willowbrook is ranked No. 8 in the Houston metro area and No. 19 in Texas by U.S. News & World Report as a "Best Hospital" in 2016. Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital specializes in cardiology and cardiovascular services, neurology, neurosurgery, orthopedics and sports medicine, and comprehensive cancer services. Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital has a Breast Care Center, Cancer Center, Imaging Center, Infusion Center Sleep Center, Surgical Weight Loss Center and operates the largest Childbirth Center in the Greater Northwest Houston area. For more information on the comprehensive services available on the Houston Methodist Willowbrook campus and to learn about upcoming events, please visit houstonmethodist.org/willowbrook. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/first-surgical-implant-of-fenix-continence-restoration-system-at-houston-methodist-willowbrook-hospital-300457010.html


Howard University Cancer Center has received a grant from the Avon Breast Cancer Crusade at AVON 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer to add bilingual patient navigation to ensure that patients get the care they need in their preferred language. The grant will also help enhance the electronic health record system to better identify their patients’ needs and connect them to essential follow-up services. The new bilingual patient navigator will assist women at the point they receive abnormal mammograms and continue to offer support in the event of diagnosis and treatment. The funds will also be used to help the Howard University Cancer Center gather and use data about patients' satisfaction with care and data on quality-of-life issues. Howard University Hospital's Women's Imaging Center provides diagnostic services to Cancer Center patients. “We are very thankful to the Avon Breast Cancer Crusade - Avon 39 for the new project funding,” Carla Williams, Ph.D., Interim Director, Howard University Cancer Center. “The support will help us greatly expand our reach to this population. Hispanic women, like African-American women, often experience more delays in follow-up care after an abnormal mammogram. Patient navigation is particularly important for these groups. ” AVON 39 Washington DC drew more than 1,700 participants from 43 states and Washington, DC, including 284 breast cancer survivors who walked a total of 39.3 miles over two days. Since AVON 39’s launch in 2003, more than 235,000 participants have raised nearly $620,000,000. Funds raised are distributed to local, regional and national breast cancer organizations. The Washington event was the second of seven events across the country united by the theme #FierceIsForever. "As the company for women, we are proud of our strong purpose-driven mission to improve the lives of women — and this includes our long-term commitment to the fight against breast cancer. I've had the great privilege of participating in the AVON 39 Walk and being a part of the powerful community of walkers. I'm inspired by the individuals whose lives have been touched by breast cancer, and who have their own personal reason for wanting to take part and make a difference," says Scott White, Chief Executive Officer, New Avon LLC. The Howard University Cancer Center has had a long history of serving minorities and underserved populations and addressing disparities. Thus, the mission of HUCC is to reduce the burden of cancer through research, education, and service, with emphasis on the unique ethnic and cultural aspects of minority and underserved populations. The Cancer Center has provided specialized, culturally competent breast cancer screening and treatment for over 25 years. For more information about the Howard University Cancer Center, visit Facebook.com/huccenter1. About AVON 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer AVON 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer is the largest fundraising event for the Avon Breast Cancer Crusade. Since its launch by the Avon Foundation for Women in 2003, more than 235,000 participants have raised nearly $620,000,000 in the fight to end breast cancer. Funds raised at each event provide direct impact in the area where the event takes place, and also help make sure that care and research programs nationwide have adequate resources to make the most progress possible. For more information about AVON 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer, visit www.avon39.org or join the #FierceIsForever conversation on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram. About New Avon LLC  New Avon LLC (“Avon”) is the leading social selling beauty company in North America, with independent sales Representatives throughout the United States, Puerto Rico and Canada. Avon's product portfolio includes award-winning skincare, color cosmetics, fragrance and personal care products, featuring iconic brands such as ANEW, Avon Color, mark., and Skin So Soft, as well as fashion and accessories. Avon has a 130-year history of empowering women through economic opportunity, and supporting the causes that matter most to women. Together, Avon and the Avon Foundation for Women have contributed over $1 billion globally toward eradicating breast cancer and domestic violence. Learn more about Avon and its products at www.avon.com.

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