Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Eliyahu S.,Ben - Gurion University of the Negev | Yerushalmi-Rozen R.,Ben - Gurion University of the Negev | Yerushalmi-Rozen R.,Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology
Chemical Communications | Year: 2010

Polymer-mediated depletion interactions were found to induce the assembly of fullerene derivates at the water-air interface into non-closed-packed 2-dimensional arrays of nanometric thickness. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Source


Home > Press > Novel anti-biofilm nano coating developed at Ben-Gurion U.: Offers significant anti-adhesive potential for a variety of medical and industrial applications Abstract: Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have developed an innovative anti-biofilm coating, which has significant anti-adhesive potential for a variety of medical and industrial applications. According to the research published in Advanced Materials Interfaces, anti-adhesive patches that are developed from naturally occurring biomaterials can prevent destructive bacterial biofilm from forming on metal surfaces when they are immersed in water and other damp environments. "Our solution addresses a pervasive need to design environmentally friendly materials to impede dangerous surface bacteria growth," the BGU researchers from the Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering explain. "This holds tremendous potential for averting biofilm formed by surface-anchored bacteria and could have a tremendous impact." The anti-adhesive could be used on medical implants, devices and surgical equipment where bacteria can contribute to chronic diseases, resist antibiotic treatment and thereby compromise the body's defense system. The prevention of aquatic biofouling on ships and bridges is one of the industrial applications. is. ### The BGU researchers who participated in the study from the Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering are Dr. Karina Goldberg, Prof. Noa Emuna, Prof. Dorit van Moppes, Prof. T. P. Vinod, Prof. Robert Marks, Prof. Ariel Kushmaro, and Prof. Shoshana Malis Arad. Profs. Marks and Kushmaro are members of BGU's Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology and the National Institute for Biotechnology in the Negev, and are also visiting researchers at the School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. This work was supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation under the CREATE program: Nanomaterials for Energy and Water Management; a Levi Eshkol scholarship from the Israeli Ministry of Science and Technology, and by a Shimona Geresh award. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


Rosenkrantz E.,Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology | Arnon S.,Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology | Arnon S.,Ben - Gurion University of the Negev
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2013

We present an innovative method for modulating light using a ferroelectric thin-film embedded with metal nanoparticles. Due to the electro-optic effect in ferroelectric PZT, changes in refractive index can be controlled by an external electric field. Consequently, the local surface plasmon resonance of embedded noble metal nanoparticles changes with the media's refractive index. As a result, their optical extinction cross-section is shifted and light passing through the film could be controlled. In other words, an external electric field could modulate light. Using Mie theory for spherical particles, we were able to approximate the metallic nanoparticle's diameter that generates the maximum optical contrast, at a given wavelength. In addition, to establish an accurate model, we considered the impact on plasmon resonance resulting from deformation of the nanoparticles. The deformation is caused by the piezoelectric property of the ferroelectric host material. We assumed 20 nm diameter Au or Ag nanoparticles embedded in a 1 μm thick PZT film. Simulations showed that these particles can reach an optical contrast of up to 12 dB, in the visible spectrum. In addition, deformation of particles had negligible impact on the shift in resonance frequency compared to the change in PZT refractive index. In this study we have shown that a nanocomposite comprising of nanoparticles embedded PZT thin film can perform as an optical modulator. This modulator will be able to achieve a high contrast with low power consumption. © 2013 SPIE. Source


Rosenkrantz E.,Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology | Arnon S.,Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology | Arnon S.,Ben - Gurion University of the Negev
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2013

Modulating retro-reflectors (MRR) are beneficial for asymmetric free-space optics communication links. An MRR includes an optical retro-reflector and an electro-optic shutter. The main advantage of an MRR configuration is that it shifts most of the power, weight, and pointing requirements onto one end of the link. In this study an innovative device comprising of nanoparticle-embedded ferroelectric thin film is used as an MRR. The new modulator is mounted in front of a passive retro-reflector. In our study we calculated the link budget for lunar exploration scenario. The scenario includes a base station that communicates with several robots or astronauts. In our simulations, the base station illuminates a robot with a continuous-wave beam, i.e. an interrogating beam. The un-modulated beam strikes the MRR, which is located on the robot, and is passively reflected back to the base station carrying the data that has been modulated onto it by the MRR. In this scenario a robot and a base-station are 4km apart, with a clear line of sight. In addition, the innovative MRR is capable of achieving 12dB contrast ratio. Under these assumptions and using the nanoparticle-embedded ferroelectric MRR we calculated the required transmission power for a given bit-rate and BER. © 2013 SPIE. Source


Rosenkrantz E.,Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology | Arnon S.,Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology | Arnon S.,Ben - Gurion University of the Negev
Optics Letters | Year: 2014

The emerging technology of visible light communications (VLC) will provide a new modality of communication. This technology uses illumination lighting to carry information. We propose to add a smart capability to mitigate interferences from unwanted light sources. This is achieved by adaptively filtering interference light using a tunable filter to block interferences dynamically. In this Letter, we present an innovative concept for a tunable notch filter based on ferroelectric thin films embedded with noble metal nanoparticles. The adaptivity of the filter is achieved by controlling the external applied voltage. This voltage creates an electric field that changes the refractive index of the host film through the linear electro-optic effect. Moreover, the fundamental characteristics of the filter are determined by the layer's parameters, such as film thickness, nanoparticles concentration and geometry, and the material of both the host thin film and nanoparticles. We study the tunability of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) embedded with Ag nanoparticles that reaches approximately 50 nm, between 530 and 590 nm. Moreover, we showed that a PZT notch filter embedded with Ag nanoshells has its stop band shifted to shorter wavelengths. These tunable filters can be used as mode selectors inside a laser resonator, spatial light filters for imaging and communication both for VLC and infrared communication. © 2014 Optical Society of America. Source

Discover hidden collaborations