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Sams M.,Ikon Science Ltd
76th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition 2014: Experience the Energy - Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2014 | Year: 2014

In the context of seismic reservoir characterisation the availability of high quality and consistent petrophysical analysis is essential. Achieving consistency is often compromised by poor data quality, lack of sufficient data and ambiguities in the data. Rock physics modelling can help to improve the consistency by ensuring that the petrophysical interpretations are also constrained by the elastic logs. There are three ways that rock physics can be used. First as a simple quality control, second to provide quantitative feedback to the petrophysics and third in a joint interpretation. The choice of method depending on the confidence achieved in the rock physics model. Source


Waters K.D.,Ikon Science Ltd
74th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition 2012 Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2012: Responsibly Securing Natural Resources | Year: 2012

Oil and gas has been found in clastic reservoirs of Eocene, Palaeocene, Cretaceous and Jurassic age and in fractured basement of Devonian/Carboniferous age in the West of Shetland area. The majority of discoveries have been in Palaeocene age reservoirs. Successful prospects tend to be in combination structural/stratigraphic plays which rely on pinch-out or facies changes up dip to the east as seen at Laggan. Most of the wells targeting Tertiary prospects were drilled on amplitude or AVO anomalies. Roughly three quarters of these wells failed to find hydrocarbons. A rock physics analysis of 35 wells in the WOS was performed on a well by well and subsequently regional basis. The analysis identifies the possibility for additional mechanisms which may help to explain the amplitudes encountered during seismic interpretation in terms of not only rock and fluid properties, but of these properties within the context of complex burial and uplift histories and changing pressure regimes. The study utilises geological reports, digital well logs, pressure data, core data, biostratigraphy, AFTA analysis and temperature data along with rock physics techniques to enhance our understanding of the WOS petroleum system. Source


Bale S.,University of Cardiff | Bale S.,Ikon Science Ltd | Alves T.M.,University of Cardiff | Moore G.F.,University of Hawaii at Manoa
Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems | Year: 2014

A 3D seismic volume from the Nankai Trough accretionary wedge (SE Japan) is used to evaluate the subsurface distribution of gas hydrates as a function of structural and stratigraphic complexity, variable heat flow patterns and the presence of subsurface fluid conduits. Eleven equations were modified for depth, pressure, and temperature, modeled in 3D, and compared with the distribution of Bottom-Simulating Reflections (BSRs) offshore Nankai. The results show that the equations produce overlapping - and thus potentially consistent - predictions for the distribution of BSRs, leading us to propose the concept of a "BSR Stability Envelope" as a method to quantify the subsurface distribution of gas hydrates on continental margins. In addition, we show that the ratio (R) between shallow and deep BSRs of seven subenvelopes, which are defined by BSR stability equations, indicates local gas hydrate equilibrium conditions. Values of R < 1 relate to cooler regions, whereas when R > 1 the majority of BSRs are located in warmer structural traps. The method in this paper can be used to recognize any divergence between observed and theoretical depths of occurrence of BSRs on 3D or 4D (time lapse) seismic volumes. In the Nankai Trough, our results point out for equilibrium conditions in BSRs located away from the Megasplay Fault Zone and major thrust faults. This latter observation demonstrates the applicability of the method to: (a) the recognition of subsurface fluid conduits and (b) the prediction of maximum and minimum depths of occurrence of gas hydrates on continental margins, under distinct thermal and hydrologic conditions. Key Points BSRs occur within stability envelopes BSRs distribution depends on heat flow Porosity, pressure, and salinity have little influence stability boundaries ©2013. The Authors. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Geophysical Union. Source


Trademark
Ikon Science Ltd | Date: 2014-04-18

Computer software for use in upstream oil and gas industry for the identification of hydrocarbon locations in the subsurface; Computer software for interpretation and analysis of oilfield, geological and seismic survey data; Computer software for geophysical modelling; data-processing equipment; surveying machines and instruments; parts and fittings for data-processing equipment and surveying machines and instruments. Scientific and technological services, namely, scientific research, scientific testing, scientific consulting services, quantitative analyses, forecasting, optimisation in the field of subsurface, geological, well and seismic data for use in connection with hydrocarbon exploration, development, production and drilling; research and design services in the field of modelling, simulation, optimisation, and prediction of subsurface, geological and seismic data for use in connection with exploration, production, development and drilling operations; industrial analysis and research services in the field of modelling, simulation, optimisation, and prediction of subsurface, geological and seismic data for use in connection with exploration, production, development and drilling operations; design and development of computer software; mathematical manipulation, processing and analysis of data in the field of modelling, stochastic simulation, optimisation, and probabilistic prediction of subsurface, geological and seismic data for use in connection with exploration, production, development and drilling operations; production of mathematical models for use in analysis of subsurface, geological, well and seismic data for use in connection with hydrocarbon exploration, development, production and drilling; evaluation, analysis and interpretation of available measured and inferred geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data and knowledge in the exploration, production, development and drilling of hydrocarbons in the subsurface; producing predictions in the field of hydrocarbon recovery based on combining expert knowledge and measured data; geophysical exploration, geological modelling, engineering forecasting, reserves estimation, well planning, production optimisation for the oil, gas and mining industries; petrophysical exploration for the oil, gas and mining industries; interpretation and analysis of oilfield, seismic and geological survey data.


Bailey T.,Ikon Science Ltd | Dutton D.,Nexen Inc.
74th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition 2012 Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2012: Responsibly Securing Natural Resources | Year: 2012

The shales of the Kimmeridge Clay formation cover an extensive area of the North Sea and act as both seal and source rock for many reservoirs. Much of the Kimmeridge Clay of the Moray Firth area can be seen to lie off the Greenberg-Castagna (1992) Vp-Vs trend for shales. Here we document the Kimmeridge Clay trend for the Moray Firth area using a database of some forty wells, creating a suggested empirical trend for the Kimmeridge Clay shales in this area. Also, some ideas will be put forward to suggest the causes for the change in shale trend. Source

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