Time filter

Source Type

Alvarez P.,Matis | Arthofer W.,University of Innsbruck | Coelho M.M.,University of Lisbon | Conklin D.,University of the Basque Country | And 15 more authors.
Molecular Ecology Resources | Year: 2015

This article documents the public availability of (i) microbiomes in diet and gut of larvae from the dipteran Dilophus febrilis using massive parallel sequencing, (ii) SNP and SSR discovery and characterization in the transcriptome of the Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus, L) and (iii) assembled transcriptome for an endangered, endemic Iberian cyprinid fish (Squalius pyrenaicus). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


PubMed | University of Würzburg, University of the Basque Country, Matis, IFAPA Centro El Toruno andalusian Research and Training Institute for Fisheries and Agriculture and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular ecology resources | Year: 2015

This article documents the public availability of (i) microbiomes in diet and gut of larvae from the dipteran Dilophus febrilis using massive parallel sequencing, (ii) SNP and SSR discovery and characterization in the transcriptome of the Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus, L) and (iii) assembled transcriptome for an endangered, endemic Iberian cyprinid fish (Squalius pyrenaicus).


Canavate J.P.,IFAPA Centro El Toruno andalusian Research and Training Institute for Fisheries and Agriculture | Perez-Gavilan C.,IFAPA Centro El Toruno andalusian Research and Training Institute for Fisheries and Agriculture | Mazuelos N.,Pesquerias Isla Mayor S.A. | Manchado M.,IFAPA Centro El Toruno andalusian Research and Training Institute for Fisheries and Agriculture
Hydrobiologia | Year: 2014

The effect of controlled flushing on natural phytoplankton communities in brackish estuarine water ponds of Doñana Natural Park (Guadalquivir marshes, SW Spain) was evaluated throughout a year cycle by 16S chloroplast rDNA metagenome analysis. Multivariate analysis of phytoplankton assemblages based on the abundance of 30 main identified microalgae included in seven different phyla revealed pond flushing accounted for 19.6% of total data variation, a value far below the 42.5% variability explained by seasonality. Microalgae species biovolume was a better descriptor explaining phytoplankton assemblages in comparison to species relative abundance. Increasing pond flushing led to augmented phytoplankton diversity in spring, summer and autumn, but not in winter. Diatoms were more abundant under high water flushing, a situation that favoured the tychopelagic behaviour of some species. Cyanobacteria and dinophytes were more abundant under low flushing. Haptophytes and cryptophytes relative biomass was also enhanced by low water flushing, but only during winter and spring. Two main haptophytes that seasonally succeeded each other exhibited opposed response to hydrology with Isochrysis sp. showing negative response to increased flushing and Diacronema vlkianum showing a positive reaction. Both species represented a permanent and relevant haptophytes contribution to phytoplankton assemblages in marsh ponds previously undescribed in the area. © 2014, Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


Mourente G.,University of Cádiz | Quintero O.,Ifapa Centro El Toruno Andalusian Research And Training Institute For Fisheries And Agriculture | Canavate J.P.,Ifapa Centro El Toruno Andalusian Research And Training Institute For Fisheries And Agriculture
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology | Year: 2015

Fatty acid profiles were obtained from perigonadal fat of 98 adult Atlantic Bluefin tuna sampled from 2008 to 2010 at their confluence near the Gibraltar Strait as a consequence of their reproductive migration to the Mediterranean. Ten additional individuals caught, at the same season, off the Canary Islands, a place where no sexual migratory confluence occurred, were also sampled for their fatty acid signatures. Gender was not significant in explaining differences in fatty acids, and other biological traits such as weight, gonad index and fat/gonad ratio all together only accounted for 13.4% of total variation. Body weight was the more relevant factor and showed maximum positive correlation with 18:1n-9 and the 22:6n-3/20:5n-3 ratio (as carnivoy and higher trophic position markers), and maximum negative correlation with the flagellate marker fatty acid, 18:4n-3. Multivariate analysis of fatty acid trophic markers revealed a main source of data variation (66.9%) due to segregation of individuals in which part of the tuna population showed signatures characteristic of trophic resources from high latitude Atlantic ecosystems as revealed by elevated contents of the marker fatty acids, 20:1n-9 and 22:1n-11. The vast majority of tuna individuals were characterized by fatty acid profiles enriched in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and more associated to temperate and subtropical Atlantic ecosystems in which haptophyte/dinophyte markers prevailed over those for diatoms at the base of their corresponding food webs. Fatty acid profiles of tuna from the Canary Islands were less dispersed than those caught at the Gibraltar Strait, reinforcing the assumption of the possible tuna confluence from different trophic grounds in this zone. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

Loading IFAPA Centro El Toruno andalusian Research and Training Institute for Fisheries and Agriculture collaborators
Loading IFAPA Centro El Toruno andalusian Research and Training Institute for Fisheries and Agriculture collaborators