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Madrid, Spain

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Madrid, Spain
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"We're excited to meet these social entrepreneurs today because they all clearly have a drive to create big opportunities for the people they serve," said BBVA Compass Director of Corporate Responsibility & Reputation Reymundo Ocañas, who will serve as one of the judges. "Our goal today is to identify those with the most sustainable businesses and with the highest social impact, and determine which ones we can help scale up so they can change even more lives for the better." The candidates will be presenting their businesses on Thursday, May 18, to four judges. In addition to Ocañas, the judges are: Jim Nolen, a distinguished senior lecturer in the McCombs School's Department of Finance; Chris McGillis, BBVA Compass Director of CRA Program Administration; and Mike Prehn, a BBVA Compass Commercial Relationship Manager based in Austin. The candidates who are unable to attend Thursday's speed-interview session in person will conduct interviews with judges by videoconference on Friday. The winners will be announced next week. What's in store for the winners The social entrepreneurs selected to participate in the program will be given seven months of online and in-person training. The online training will be provided by the Corporate Learning Alliance, a joint initiative between the Financial Times and Spain's IE Business School, while the in-person training will be conducted at the McCombs School of Business. Several networking opportunities are also built into the program, giving entrepreneurs the chance to learn from previous BBVA Momentum participants and investors. And finally, BBVA Compass will select those businesses considered most sustainable and with the highest social impact for further investment opportunities. BBVA Momentum already has driven the expansion of 92 companies with high social impact in Spain, Mexico and Peru. The companies selected to participate have focused on a variety of social problems, whether it's the treatment of cognitive impairment in the elderly or helping the neediest citizens build their own homes out of sustainable materials. Jointly, they employ 3,200 people and their activities have benefited more than a million people. To learn more about BBVA Compass, visit: www.bbvacompass.com For more news visit: www.bbva.com and newsroom.bbvacompass.com About BBVA Group BBVA is a customer-centric global financial services group founded in 1857. The Group is the largest financial institution in Spain and Mexico and it has leading franchises in South America and the Sunbelt Region of the United States; and it is also the leading shareholder in Garanti, Turkey's biggest bank for market capitalization. Its diversified business is focused on high-growth markets and it relies on technology as a key sustainable competitive advantage. Corporate responsibility is at the core of its business model. BBVA fosters financial education and inclusion, and supports scientific research and culture. It operates with the highest integrity, a long-term vision and applies the best practices. More information about BBVA Group can be found at bbva.com. About BBVA Compass BBVA Compass is a Sunbelt-based financial institution that operates 657 branches, including 342 in Texas, 89 in Alabama, 63 in Arizona, 61 in California, 45 in Florida, 38 in Colorado and 19 in New Mexico. BBVA Compass ranks among the top 25 largest U.S. commercial banks based on deposit market share and ranks among the largest banks in Alabama (2nd), Texas (4th) and Arizona (5th). BBVA Compass has been recognized as one of the leading small business lenders by the Small Business Administration (SBA) and ranked 5th nationally in the total number of SBA loans originated in fiscal year 2016. Additional information about BBVA Compass can be found at www.bbvacompass.com. For more BBVA Compass news, follow @BBVACompassNews on Twitter or visit newsroom.bbvacompass.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/judges-from-bbva-compass-ut-austin-mccombs-school-of-business-gather-today-to-select-inaugural-class-of-social-entrepreneurs-for-bbva-momentum-300460337.html


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Startup Iceland, the annual international entrepreneur conference, which takes place in Reykjavik, Iceland, between 31 May - 1 June 2017, will explore health and personal data in a post-GDPR digital economy. The 2-day event will bring together entrepreneurs, investors and influencers in Health and Personal Data to discuss the European GDPR impact on business, consumers and international economies. Iceland’s Prime Minister Bjarni Benediktsson will open the event’s speaker program at Harpa Conference and Event Center on 31 May. “Over the past 6 years, Startup Iceland has contributed significantly to an increased international interest in Icelandic startups and sparked deal flow for a growing number of entrepreneurs and investors,” said Startup Iceland’s founder, Bala Kamallakharan. “The success of the event is attributable to the value it has created annually for attendees through its timely content programming and by bringing together some of the most influential individuals in business and investment from Iceland, North America and Europe.” Author and Co-founder of Jaywalk, John Biggs, will serve as MC for the event. International speakers will include Brad Burnham, Managing Partner, Union Square Ventures; Maria Soloveychik, Founder, SyntheX Lab; Arvind Gupta, Venture Partner, SOS Ventures; Anitha Jayaprakash, Founder, Girihlet; Jeff Slobotski, Founder, Router Ventures; Jerry Colonna, Coach and Co-founder, Reboot; Michelle Morrison, Design Program Manager, Facebook; Josh Allan Dykstra, Author, "Igniting the Invisible Tribe: Designing An Organization That Doesn't Suck"; Julian Ranger, Founder, Digi.me; Melissa Jun Rowley, Journalist and Co-founder, Resolve accelerator; and Ida Tin, CEO and Co-founder, Clue. The international speakers will be joined by mentors, investors and entrepreneurs in the Icelandic business community such as Thorvardur Sveinsson, Executive Director, Vodafone Iceland, Svana Gunnarsdottir, Partner, Frumtak Ventures; Einar Gunnar Gudmundsson, Corporate Entrepreneur, Arion Bank; Salome Gudmundsdottir, CEO, Icelandic Startups; Freyr Holm Ketilsson, CEO, Dattaca Labs; Dr. Tryggvi Thorgeirsson, Founder and CEO, SidekickHealth; Tristan Gribbin, Co-founder and CEO, FLOW VR; Joi Sigurdsson, Co-founder and CEO, Crankwheel; Thorsteinn Fridriksson, Founder, Plain Vanilla Games; and Sandra Mjoll Jonsdottir-Bush, Co-founder, Platome. Additionally, the winners of Stökkpallurinn and the 2017 class of Startup Reykjavik entrepreneurs will be announced on stage at the close of the day. The conference program will close on 1 June at Haskolinn Reykjavik with Startup Iceland’s renowned “office hours” style mentoring sessions, where attendees have the unique opportunity to meet one-to-one with the event speakers and other seasoned executives and influencers. Entrepreneurs, startup founders, senior executives, venture fund managers, angel investors, financial institutions, government agencies, business journalists, business students, and those involved in the business of value creation and growth attend Startup Iceland. Participants represent startup communities from Iceland, the US and Europe. Attendees learn strategies that are immediately applicable to their own businesses and communities. Startup Iceland partners include: Icelandair Group, Dattaca Labs, Haskólinn Reykjavík, Vodafone, Embassy of The United States of America, Frumtak Ventures, Deloitte Ísland, Federation of Icelandic Industries, Promote Iceland (Íslandsstofa), Innovation Center Iceland, City of Reykjavik, Iceland Ocean Cluster (Sjávarklasinn), NSA Ventures (Nýsköpunarsjóður), Sigur Digital Agency, IE Business School, Bungalo.com and TeqHire.com. For tickets and information, please visit startupiceland.com. About Startup Iceland Founded by investor Bala Kamallakharan in 2012, the Startup Iceland Conference (#startupISK) brings together leaders from Iceland, the global community of entrepreneurs, enterprise businesses and government to discuss and create solutions to promote economic growth in startup communities throughout the world. The conference is a 2-day event that includes single track conference presentations by leaders from startup communities throughout the world, as well as several conference-adjacent networking and business development opportunities including “office hours” style mentoring sessions. For more information, please visit StartupIceland.com.


Mithas S.,University of Maryland University College | Tafti A.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Bardhan I.,University of Texas at Dallas | Goh J.M.,IE Business School
MIS Quarterly: Management Information Systems | Year: 2012

Do information technology investments improve firm profitability? If so, is this effect because such investments help improve sales, or is it because they help reduce overall operating expenses? How does the effect of IT on profitability compare with that of advertising and of research and development? These are important questions because investments in IT constitute a large part of firms' discretionary expenditures, and managers need to understand the likely impacts and mechanisms to justify and realize value from their IT and related resource allocation processes. The empirical evidence in this paper, derived using archival data from 1998 to 2003 for more than 400 global firms, suggests that IT has a positive impact on profitability. Importantly, the effect of IT investments on sales and profitability is higher than that of other discretionary investments, such as advertising and R & D. A significant portion of the impact of IT on firm profitability is accounted for by ITenabled revenue growth, but there is no evidence for the effect of IT on profitability through operating cost reduction. Taken together, these findings suggest that firms have had greater success in achieving higher profitability through IT-enabled revenue growth than through IT-enabled cost reduction. They also provide important implications for managers to make allocations among discretionary expenditures such as IT, advertising, and R & D. With regard to IT expenditures, the results imply that firms should accord higher priority to IT projects that have revenue growth potential over those that focus mainly on cost savings.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Un nuevo informe encargado por Samsung revela que las empresas necesitarán invertir para asegurar que están listas para la próxima ola de la revolución digital Un nuevo informe encargado por Samsung revela que para 2020 las compañías que no hayan abierto sus fronteras a competidores, innovadores y una nueva generación de autónomos independientes luchará por prosperar en lo que Samsung llama la "Open Economy". Esta nueva Open Economy se caracterizará por un uso profundo de los trabajadores autónomos, integrando la rutina de la innovación orientada a nuevas empresas y un tipo de colaboración entre antiguos competidores. En la última década, gracias a la ubicuidad de la tecnología móvil, las empresas se han hecho más abiertas y colaborativas y tienen un claro conocimiento de las ventajas en comparación con los modelos empresariales "cerrados" existentes. Sin embargos, dentro de solo tres años, las organizaciones estarán operando en un mundo mucho menos restringido por límites técnicos o humanos. Las personas, datos e ideas se integrarán en los actuales modelos empresariales más libremente, pero sera crucial para las empresas entenderse con, y adoptar totalmente, las tecnologías ágiles y expectativas de la cultura laboral del mañana. Para prosperar en este mundo de las nuevas tecnologías y fuerzas laborales digitales altamente dispersas, las compañías necesitarán adoptar plataformas de seguridad que les permitan compartir información de manera abierta, pero segura. Esto a su vez las forzará a replantear fundamentalmente cómo construyen sus modelos empresariales y las tecnologías de las que dependen. "Encontrar maneras de empoderar con seguridad nuevas olas de trabajadores autónomos futuros sera el reto empresarial número uno. Dentro de tres años, se espera que las personas tengan que enfrentarse a más de 7.300 millones de dispositivos conectados[1], mientras una fuerza laboral rápidamente digitalizada y cambiante evolucionará a una que transformará las empresas en cómo, dónde y cuándo operan", dijo Nick Dawson, director global de Knox Strategy. En el escenario global, las compañías europeas están liderando el camino para adoptar la infraestructura y capital humano que empoderará la siguiente fase de esta revolución digital. Esto les pondrá en posición de pole para aprovechar las fuerzas laborales y empresas abiertas y ultra-flexibles en los próximos tres a diez años, según la investigación de The Future Laboratory que formó la base del informe. En las industrias, la innovación emergerá de nuevas fuentes, y las tácticas de innovación inversa de integración de empresas recientes en el centro de las organizaciones se convertirá en la norma. Mientras este nuevo futuro se desarrolla, se convertirá en elementos estratégicos críticos y una potente fuerza conductora para la innovación en cada parte de las empresas. Marcos Eguillor, fundador de BinaryKnowledge y professor de IE Business School, un especialista en innovación y transformación digital, dijo: "Basándonos en que las certezas pasadas no impulsarán la creatividad necesitaremos competir en el mercado global del mañana. Las compañías necesitarán adoptar las tecnologías que les permitan ser lo suficientemente rápidas y flexible para detectar y entender sus próximas ventajas competitivas y reconocer cuándo es el momento para retirarse de lo anterior". Las organizaciones del mañana utilizarán AI y tecnología de aprendizaje mecanizado para predecir exactamente -y tomar mejores decisiones- sobre su futuro. No solo son los dispositivos de hoy los que presentan riesgo. Las nuevas inteligencias mecanizadas ya se están desplegando ampliamente en el mundo comercial, son auto-organizativas, auto-adaptativas y capaces de hacer predicciones mucho más precisas sobre el estado futuro de sus empresas. La inteligencia mecanizada avanzada dará a estas compañías que las adopten un poder sin precedentes para planificar y optimizar sus modelos empresariales. Sin embargo, este deseo de un enfoque más abierto a menudo entra en conflicto con la necesidad crítica de mantener altos niveles de seguridad en todo momento en una red completa de dispositivos y extremos de la compañía. Impulsadas por un panorama de amenazas en rápida evolución y reforzada por las nuevas legislaciones como la regulación de protección de datos generales (GDPR), las organizaciones afrontarán muchos nuevos retos mientras luchan por proteger sus datos en toda su empresa. Nick Dawson continuó: "Las plataformas de ciberseguridad que permiten a las empresas estar tecnológicamente abiertas y seguras serán la clave para desbloquear el futuro de la Open Economy". Samsung Knox es dicha plataforma. Hoy, es la defensa más potente frente a las amenazas de seguridad móvil en el sitio de trabajo, gracias a un diseño adaptativo y modular que integra las claves encriptación y seguridad en un contenedor de hardware basado en chip seguro. Esto permite la creación de trabajo totalmente aslado y seguro e identidades personales en el mismo dispositivo móvil, asegurando que los datos corporativos son siempre inaccesibles para aplicaciones y procesos personales y, críticamente, que la privacidad personal se respete y mantenga siempre. Samsung está idealmente dispuesta para ayudar a las empresas a lograr esto como su herencia de consume y conocimiento profundo de cómo las personas utilizan realmente sus dispositivos móviles ofrece una perspectiva sin precedentes sobre cómo las organizaciones pueden maximizar las ventajas competitivas de las nuevas tecnologías móviles. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. inspira al mundo y determina el futuro con ideas y tecnologías transformadoras, redefiniendo los mundos de la televisión, teléfonos inteligentes, dispositivos portátiles, tabletas, cámaras, aparatos digitales, impresoras, equipamiento médico, sistemas de red, semiconductores y soluciones LED. Para más información, visite la sala de prensa de Samsung en http://news.samsung.com The Future Laboratory es una consultora de predicción de tendencias global, que busca inspirar y poner a prueba de futuro a las organizaciones. Para más información, consulte: http://www.thefuturelaboratory.com


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

A new report commissioned by Samsung reveals businesses will need to invest to ensure they're ready for the next wave of the digital revolution A new report commissioned by Samsung reveals that by 2020 companies which have not opened their borders to competitors, innovators and a new generation of independent freelancers will struggle to prosper in what Samsung calls the 'Open Economy' . This new Open Economy will be characterised by a deep use of freelance workers, routine embedding of startup driven innovation and a new kind of collaboration between former competitors. Over the last decade, thanks to the ubiquity of mobile technology, businesses have become more open and collaborative and have a clear understanding of the benefits compared to existing 'closed' business models. However, within just three years, organisations will be operating in a world much less restricted by technical or human boundaries. People, data and ideas will be integrated into current business models more freely, yet it will be crucial for businesses to get to grips with, and fully embrace, the agile technologies and expectations of tomorrow's work culture. To thrive in this world of new technologies and highly dispersed digital workforces, companies will need to embrace security platforms which will allow them to share information openly but safely. This in turn will force them to fundamentally rethink how they build their business models and the technologies they depend on. "Finding ways to safely empower new waves of future freelance workers is going to be the number one business challenge. Within three years, it's expected that businesses will have to deal with over 7.3 billion connected devices[1], whilst a rapidly digitised and changing workforce will evolve to one that will transform businesses in how, where and when they operate," says Nick Dawson, Global Director Knox Strategy. On the global stage, European companies are leading the way in adopting the infrastructure and human capital that will power the next stage of this digital revolution. This will put them in pole position to harness the open and ultra-flexible workforces and businesses over the next three to ten years, according to research from The Future Laboratory which formed the basis of the report. Across industries, innovation will emerge from new sources, with reverse innovation tactics of embedding start-ups at the heart of organisations becoming the norm. As this new future develops they will become critical strategic elements and a powerful driving force for innovation in every corner of businesses. Marcos Eguillor, Founder of BinaryKnowledge and professor at IE Business School, a specialist in digital innovation and transformation, says, "Relying on past certainties will not foster the creativity that business will need to compete in tomorrow's global market place. Companies will need to adopt the technologies that allow them to be fast and flexible enough to spot and understand their next competitive advantages, and recognise when it's time to disengage from the previous one." Tomorrow's organisations will use AI and machine learning technology to accurately predict - and make better decisions - about their future. It is not just today's devices that present risk. Already new machine intelligences are being widely deployed in the commercial world that are self-organising, self-adapting and capable of far more accurate predictions about the future state of their businesses. Advanced machine intelligence will give those companies which adopt them unprecedented power to plan ahead and optimise their business models. However, this desire for a more open approach often conflicts with the critical need to maintain high levels of security at all times across a company's entire network of devices and endpoints. Driven by a rapidly evolving threat landscape and enforced by new legislations such as General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), organisations will face many new challenges as they strive to protect their data across their entire business. Nick Dawson continues, "Cyber-security platforms that allow businesses to be both technologically open and safe are the key to unlocking the future of the Open Economy." Samsung Knox is such a platform. Today, it is the most powerful defence against mobile security threats in the workplace, thanks to an adaptive, modular design that embeds encryption and security keys in a secure chip-based hardware container. This allows the creation of secure, completely isolated work and personal identities on the same mobile device, ensuring that corporate data is always inaccessible to personal apps and processes and, critically, that personal privacy is always respected and maintained. Samsung is ideally placed to help businesses achieve this as its rich consumer heritage and deep understanding of how people really use their mobile devices provides an unrivalled perspective on exactly how organisations can maximise competitive advantages of new mobile technologies. About Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. inspires the world and shapes the future with transformative ideas and technologies. The company is redefining the worlds of TVs, smartphones, wearable devices, tablets, cameras, digital appliances, medical equipment, network systems, and semiconductor and LED solutions. For the latest news, please visit Samsung Newsroom at http://news.samsung.com The Future Laboratory is a global trends forecasting consultancy, which aims to inspire and future-proof organisations. For more information see: http://www.thefuturelaboratory.com


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Un nouveau rapport demandé par Samsung révèle que les entreprises vont devoir investir si elles veulent être prêtes pour la nouvelle vague de la révolution numérique Un nouveau rapport demandé par Samsung révèle que d'ici 2020, les sociétés qui n'auront pas ouvert leurs frontières aux concurrents, aux innovateurs et à une nouvelle génération de professionnels indépendants auront du mal à prospérer dans ce que Samsung appelle « l'Open Economy ». Cette nouvelle l'Open Economy sera caractérisée par un recours important aux travailleurs indépendants, une intégration systématique de nouveautés axées sur les startups et un nouveau genre de collaboration entre les anciens concurrents. Ces dix dernières années, grâce à l'omniprésence de la technologie mobile, les entreprises sont devenues plus ouvertes et collaboratives, et comprennent clairement les avantages de cette nouvelle attitude par rapport aux anciens modèles d'affaires « fermés ». Toutefois, en l'espace de seulement trois ans, les organisations opéreront dans un monde beaucoup moins restreint par les frontières techniques ou humaines. Les individus, les données et les idées seront intégrés plus facilement dans les modèles d'affaires actuels, et il sera donc crucial pour les entreprises de se familiariser et d'adopter dans leur totalité les technologies agiles et les attentes générées par la culture du travail de demain. Afin de prospérer dans ce monde de nouvelles technologies et de main-d'œuvre numérique hautement dispersée, les sociétés devront adopter des plateformes de sécurité qui leur permettront de partager les informations de manière ouverte mais sûre. Elle devront alors repenser fondamentalement la manière dont elles développent leurs modèles d'affaires et les technologies dont elles dépendent. « Le principal défi d'entreprise sera de trouver des manières d'autonomiser en toute sécurité les nouvelles vagues de futurs travailleurs indépendants. Dans les trois années à venir, on s'attend à ce que les entreprises aient à gérer plus de 7,3 milliards d'appareils connectés[1], tandis qu'une main d'œuvre en constante évolution et rapidement digitalisée transformera les entreprises dans leur manière globale d'opérer », a déclaré Nick Dawson, Directeur mondial de Knox Strategy. À l'échelle de la planète, les sociétés européennes montrent la voie en adoptant l'infrastructure et le capital humain qui soutiendront la prochaine étape de cette révolution numérique. Elles seront ainsi placées en pole position au cours des trois à dix ans à venir pour exploiter les forces de travail et les entreprises ouvertes et ultra flexibles, selon une étude menée par The Future Laboratory ayant servi de base au rapport. Dans tous les secteurs, l'innovation naîtra de nouvelles sources, avec comme nouvelle norme, des tactiques d'innovation inverse (ou reverse innovation) visant à intégrer les startups au cœur des organisations. Avec la mise en place de ce nouvel avenir, elles deviendront des éléments stratégiques cruciaux ainsi qu'une force motrice puissante pour l'innovation à tous les niveaux de l'entreprise. Marcos Eguillor, fondateur de BinaryKnowledge et professeur à l'IE Business School, spécialiste de l'innovation et de la transformation numérique, a déclaré : « S'appuyer sur des certitudes passées ne favorisera pas la créativité dont les entreprises auront besoin pour faire face à la concurrence sur le marché mondial de demain. Les sociétés devront adopter les technologies qui leur permettront d'acquérir suffisamment de rapidité et de flexibilité pour définir et comprendre les prochains avantages concurrentiels, et savoir lorsque le moment est venu de s'éloigner des précédents. » Les organisations de demain utiliseront l'IA et la technologie d'apprentissage automatique pour prévoir avec précision leur avenir, et prendre ainsi de meilleures décisions. Ce ne sont pas seulement les appareils d'aujourd'hui qui présentent des risques. Les nouvelles intelligences artificielles sont déjà largement déployées dans le monde commercial. Elles s'auto-organisent et s'auto-adaptent et sont capables de faire des prédictions bien plus précises sur l'état futur de leurs entreprises. L'intelligence artificielle de pointe donnera aux sociétés qui l'adopteront un pouvoir de planification sans précédent et optimisera leurs modèles d'affaires. Toutefois, leur désir d'adopter une approche plus ouverte entre souvent en conflit avec le besoin critique de conserver constamment de hauts niveaux de sécurité sur l'ensemble du réseau d'appareils et de terminaux d'une société. Poussées par un contexte de menaces évoluant rapidement et devant appliquer les nouvelles lois telles que le Règlement général sur la protection des données (RGPD), les organisations seront confrontées à de nombreux nouveaux défis lorsqu'elles s'efforceront de protéger leurs données sur l'ensemble de leur activité. « Les plateformes de cybersécurité qui permettent aux entreprises d'être à la fois ouvertes et sûres d'un point de vue technologique sont la clé de l'avenir de l'Open Economy », a rajouté Nick Dawson. Samsung Knox est ce genre de plateforme. Aujourd'hui, il s'agit du moyen de défense le plus puissant sur le marché contre les menaces en matière de sécurité provenant des appareils mobiles, grâce à un concept adaptatif et modulaire qui intègre le cryptage et les clés de sécurité dans un matériel informatique à puce. Cette plateforme permet de créer des identités sécurisées et complètement isolées sur le même périphérique mobile, garantissant que les données d'entreprise ne soient jamais accessibles aux applications et démarches personnelles et, par dessus tout, que la vie privée soit toujours respectée et préservée. Samsung est idéalement placé pour permettre aux entreprises d'atteindre cet objectif. Sa grande expérience dans le secteur de la consommation et sa profonde compréhension de la manière dont les gens utilisent véritablement leurs appareils mobiles fournissent en effet une perspective inégalée pour savoir exactement comment les organisations peuvent optimiser les avantages concurrentiels des nouvelles technologies mobiles. Pour télécharger le rapport dans son intégralité, rendez-vous sur : http://www.samsungatwork.com/openeconomy Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. inspire le monde et façonne l'avenir grâce à des idées et des technologies novatrices. Cette société redéfinit le monde des téléviseurs, smartphones, appareils portables, tablettes, appareils photo, appareils numériques, équipements médicaux, systèmes de réseau et des solutions intégrant les LED ainsi que les semiconducteurs. Pour prendre connaissance des dernières actualités, veuillez consulter Samsung Newsroom sur http://news.samsung.com The Future Laboratory est un cabinet international de prévision des tendances dont l'objectif est d'inspirer les organisations et de les protéger contre l'obsolescence. Pour obtenir davantage d'informations, consulter : http://www.thefuturelaboratory.com


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Unternehmen werden investieren müssen, um auf die nächste Phase der digitalen Revolution vorbereitet zu sein. • 7,3 Milliarden vernetzte Geräte im Jahr 2020 stellen Unternehmen vor Herausforderungen • Erfolg in der "Open Economy" wird davon abhängen, Offenheit und Sicherheit zu kombinieren Unternehmen, die ihre Strukturen künftig nicht für Wettbewerber, innovative Start-ups und eine neue Generation an Freelancern öffnen, werden es schwer haben, in der "Open Economy" erfolgreich zu sein. Das geht aus einem aktuellen Bericht von The Future Laboratory vor, den Samsung in Auftrag gegeben hat. Die derzeit entstehende "Open Economy" wird sich durch eine enge Zusammenarbeit von Organisationen mit freien Mitarbeitern, die routinemäßige Einbettung von Start-ups und ihrer Innovationskultur in Unternehmen sowie eine neue Art der Kollaboration zwischen ehemaligen Wettbewerbern auszeichnen. Bedingt durch den Siegeszug mobiler Technologien setzen bereits heute zunehmend mehr Unternehmen auf Offenheit und Kollaboration, und haben dadurch ein klares Verständnis für die Vorteile dieses Ansatzes gegenüber "geschlossenen" Geschäftsmodellen. In nur drei Jahren werden Organisationen in einer Welt mit deutlich weniger technologischen und menschlichen Grenzen agieren. Menschen, Daten und Ideen werden in Zukunft sehr viel freier in bestehende Geschäftsmodelle integriert werden; gleichzeitig wird es für Unternehmen noch deutlich wichtiger sein, agile Technologien zu nutzen, um die Erwartungen der Mitarbeiter von morgen zu erfüllen. Um in dieser Welt aus neuen Technologien und zunehmend autonomen, digital versierten Mitarbeitern erfolgreich zu agieren, sind Unternehmen auf Sicherheitsplattformen angewiesen, die es ihnen ermöglichen, Informationen offen aber sicher zu teilen. Dafür wiederum müssen sie bestehende Geschäftsmodelle auf den Prüfstand stellen und Klarheit darüber gewinnen, auf welche Technologien sie in Zukunft besonders angewiesen sein werden. "Freie Mitarbeiter effektiv, aber sicher in Geschäftsprozesse einzubinden, wird für Unternehmen die größte Herausforderung darstellen", kommentiert Nick Dawson, Global Director Knox Strategy, die Erkenntnisse des Berichts. "Wir rechnen damit, dass Unternehmen es in nur drei Jahren mit mehr als 7,3 Milliarden vernetzten Geräten Gartner Inc, Internet of Things (IoT) Study 2015 zu tun haben werden. Gleichzeit wächst gerade eine Generation an Mitarbeitern heran, die sehr viel autonomer bestimmen möchten, wie, wo und wann sie arbeiten und diesen Stempel auch Unternehmen und ihren Geschäftsmodellen aufdrücken werden." Aus dem Bericht von The Future Laboratory geht auch hervor, dass europäische Unternehmen im weltweiten Vergleich bereits führend darin sind, die richtigen Infrastrukturen zu schaffen und kompetente Mitarbeiter einzustellen, um die nächste Phase der digitalen Revolution aktiv mit zu gestalten. Damit haben sie eine sehr gute Ausgangsposition, um in den nächsten drei bis zehn Jahren von den Vorteilen einer flexibleren Arbeitswelt zu profitieren. Innovation wird sich in Zukunft aus neuen Quellen speisen und zwar branchenunabhängig. Neue Innovationstaktiken wie die Einbettung von Start-ups in bestehende Organisationen werden zur Norm und zu strategisch wichtigen Maßnahmen, um Innovation in allen Unternehmensbereichen voranzutreiben. "Um im globalen Markt wettbewerbsfähig zu sein, können sich Unternehmen nicht auf veraltete Strukturen verlassen", erläutert Marcos Eguillor, Gründer von BinaryKnowledge, Professor an der IE Business School und Spezialist für digitale Innovation and Transformation. "Unternehmen müssen in die richtigen Technologien investieren, die es ihnen ermöglichen, schnell und flexibel zu agieren und ihre Wettbewerbsvorteile zu verstehen. Dazu gehört es auch, zu erkennen, wann es an der Zeit ist, sich aus einem Markt zurückzuziehen." In der "Open Economy" werden Organisationen verstärkt auf Künstliche Intelligenz und maschinelles Lernen setzen, um die Zukunft akkurat vorherzusagen und auf dieser Basis bessere Entscheidungen zu treffen. Schon heute werden in vielen kommerziellen Bereichen intelligente Technologien eingesetzt, die sich selbst organisieren, auf neue Situationen einstellen und dadurch in der Lage sind, sehr genaue Prognosen über die zukünftige Entwicklung ihrer Unternehmen zu treffen. Fortgeschrittene maschinelle Intelligenz wird den Unternehmen, die sie zu nutzen wissen, ganz neue Möglichkeiten eröffnen, vorauszuplanen und ihre Geschäftsmodelle zu optimieren. Die Ergebnisse des Berichts zeigen auch: bei allen Vorteilen eines offeneren Ansatzes, stehen Unternehmen gleichzeitig vor der Herausforderung, die Sicherheit ihrer Organisation zu garantieren - und zwar zu jedem Zeitpunkt und über das gesamte Netzwerk an Geräten und Endpunkten hinweg. Angesichts immer neuer Bedrohungen sowie neuer gesetzlicher Vorgaben wie der europäischen Datenschutz-Grundverordnung (DSGV), werden die Anforderungen an Unternehmen im Bereich Sicherheit und Datenschutz nur weiter steigen. "Erfolg wird in der ‚Open Economy' vor allem von Sicherheitsplattformen abhängen, die es Unternehmen ermöglichen, gleichzeitig offen und sicher zu agieren", so Samsung-Experte Nick Dawson. Samsung Knox ist die derzeit leistungsfähigste Abwehr gegen mobile Sicherheitsbedrohungen am Arbeitsplatz. Die Grundlage dafür bildet ein anpassungsfähiges, modulares Design, welches kryptographische Schlüssel in einen sicheren, in den Geräte-Chipsatz integrierten Hardware-Container einbettet. Es ermöglicht die Erstellung zweier sicherer und vollständig voneinander isolierter Identitäten - privat und geschäftlich - auf ein und demselben Mobilgerät. Private Apps und Prozesse können nicht auf Unternehmensdaten zugreifen und die persönliche Privatsphäre der Nutzer bleibt gewahrt. Aus seiner langjährigen Erfahrung in der Entwicklung von Technologien für den Endkunden weiß Samsung, wie sich Anwender in verschiedenen Märkten verhalten und wie sie ihre Mobilgeräte wirklich nutzen. Dank dieser einzigartigen Marktperspektive kann Samsung sehr gut einschätzen, wie Organisationen den Wettbewerbsvorteil, den der Einsatz mobiler Technologien ihnen bietet, maximieren können Den vollständigen Bericht zur "Open Economy" finden Sie unter: http://www.samsungatwork.com/openeconomy Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. inspiriert Menschen und gestaltet die Zukunft mit Ideen und Technologien, die unser Leben verbessern. Das Unternehmen verändert die Welt von Fernsehern, Smartphones, Wearable Devices, Tablets, Kameras, Haushaltsgeräten, Medizintechnischen Geräten, Netzwerk-Systemen, Halbleitern und LED-Lösungen. Entdecken Sie die neuesten Nachrichten, Hintergrundinformationen und Pressematerialien auf www.samsung.de und im Samsung Newsroom unter news.samsung.com/de.


Salvador F.,IE Business School | Villena V.H.,Pennsylvania State University
Journal of Supply Chain Management | Year: 2013

Integrating suppliers into new product development (NPD) projects offers manufacturers the potential for substantial improvements in the new product being designed. However, it also creates significant inter-organizational integration diseconomies that can negatively affect the manufacturing cost and performance of the designed product. We propose that these diseconomies can be reduced to the extent that the manufacturer is able to design modular products - i.e., it has a modular design competence (MDC). We also suggest that such an effect tends to become weaker for high levels of product and process innovation. We test our hypotheses on an international sample of 165 NPD projects using hierarchical linear regression. Our results provide support for the moderation effect of MDC and partial support for the weakening of this effect under high product and process innovation. We discuss the implications for the literature of buyer-supplier relationships in NPD, inter-firm modularity and product-process-supply chain design as well as practice. © 2013 Institute for Supply Management, Inc.


Tenhiala A.,IE Business School
Journal of Operations Management | Year: 2011

Although the reliability of production plans is crucial for the performance of manufacturing organizations, most practitioners use considerably simpler planning methods than what is recommended in the operations management literature. This article employs the contingency theory of organizations to explain the gap between the practice and the academic models of production planning. Arguments on the contingency effects of process complexity lead to a hypothesis that expects simple capacity planning methods to be most effective in certain production processes. A strong inference research setting is used to test the contingency hypothesis against a conventional hypothesis that expects the most sophisticated planning techniques to always be most effective. Multisource data from the machinery manufacturing industry support the contingency hypothesis and reject the universalistic hypothesis. The findings are explained using the concepts of task interdependence and bounded rationality. The results have several managerial implications, and they elaborate how classic concepts in organization theory can bring practically relevant insights to operations management research. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Villena V.H.,IE Business School | Revilla E.,IE Business School | Choi T.Y.,Arizona State University
Journal of Operations Management | Year: 2011

The literature on supply chain management (SCM) has consistently promoted the "bright side" of collaborative buyer-supplier relationships (BSRs). Based on the social capital argument, SCM scholars have investigated how a buyer can gain access to and leverage resources through its collaborative BSRs. Our study extends this research stream by considering the "dark side" of social capital in BSRs. It evaluates how social capital in its cognitive, relational, and structural forms contributes to or impedes value creation within BSRs. Both primary survey measures and secondary objective measures have been used in data analysis. The results show the presence of both the bright side, confirming the existing literature, and the dark side, extending the literature. There is an inverted curvilinear relationship between social capital and performance: Either too little or too much social capital can hurt performance. This study confirms that building social capital in a collaborative BSR positively affects buyer performance, but that if taken to an extreme it can reduce the buyer's ability to be objective and make effective decisions as well as increase the supplier's opportunistic behavior. Our study also examines how a buyer can delay the emergence of the dark side. It opens up new research avenues in the collaborative BSR context and suggests directions for future research and practice. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

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