IDEXX BioResearch

Columbia, MO, United States

IDEXX BioResearch

Columbia, MO, United States
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PubMed | University of Missouri, IDEXX BioResearch, Michigan State University and University of Pennsylvania
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science : JAALAS | Year: 2015

Despite the routine collection of oocytes from African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) for use in research, few studies have evaluated methods for preparing their skin for surgery. We evaluated 3 skin preparatory agents by examining their antibacterial efficacy and the gross and microscopic appearance of Xenopus skin after exposure. Frogs (n = 14) were sedated and treated (contact time, 10 min) with 0.9% sterile NaCl on one-half of the ventrum and with 0.5% povidone-iodine or 0.75% chlorhexidine on the other half. Bacterial cultures were obtained before and after skin treatment; bacteria were identified by mass spectrometry. To assess inflammation and degenerative changes, the incision sites were photographed and biopsied at 0, 1, and 7 d after surgery. We isolated at least 22 genera of bacteria from the skin of our frog population (mean SE, 5.21 0.82 genera per frog). Iodine (2.00 0.44 genera) and chlorhexidine (0.29 0.76 genera) both had greater antimicrobial activity than did saline. Skin erythema did not correlate with treatment group. Histologic evidence of epidermal degeneration and necrosis was greater on days 1 and 7 after chlorhexidine treatment than after iodine or saline. In addition, frogs treated with chlorhexidine had a higher incidence of clinical illness associated with the exposure site. In summary, although chlorhexidine has adequate antimicrobial activity against organisms on X. laevis skin, it leads to skin damage and subsequent clinical complications. We therefore do not recommend chlorhexidine as a preoperative preparation agent in Xenopus.


Alvarado C.G.,University of Missouri | Kocsis A.G.,University of Missouri | Hart M.L.,University of Missouri | Crim M.J.,IDEXX BioResearch | And 2 more authors.
Comparative Medicine | Year: 2015

Helicobacter spp. are some of the most prevalent bacterial contaminants of laboratory mice. Although abundant data regarding the diseases associated with H. hepaticus infection are available, little is known about the pathogenicity of H. ganmani, which was first isolated in 2001 from the intestines of laboratory mice. The objective of this study was to evaluate the host response to H. ganmani colonization in H. hepaticus disease-resistant C57BL/6 and disease-susceptible A/J and IL10-deficient mice. Mice were inoculated with H. ganmani, H. hepaticus, or Brucella broth. Cecal lesion scores, cecal gene expression, and Helicobacter load were measured at 4 and 90 d after inoculation. At both time points, mice inoculated with H. ganmani had similar or significantly more copies of cecum-associated Helicobacter DNA than did mice inoculated with H. hepaticus. When compared with those of sham-inoculated control mice, cecal lesion scores at 4 and 90 d after inoculation were not significantly greater in H. ganmani-inoculated A/J, C57BL/6, or IL10-deficient mice. Analysis of cecal gene expression demonstrated that H. ganmani infection failed to cause significant elevations of IFNγ in A/J, C57BL/6, or IL10-deficient mice. However, in IL10-deficient mice, H. ganmani infection was associated with a significant increase in the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL12/23p40. Although H. ganmani infection in this study failed to induce the typhlitis that is the hallmark of H. hepaticus infection, infection with H. ganmani was associated with alterations in inflammatory cytokines in IL10-deficient mice. Copyright 2015 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.


Cook M.T.,University of Missouri | Mafuvadze B.,University of Missouri | Besch-Williford C.,IDEXX BioResearch | Ellersieck M.R.,University of Missouri | And 2 more authors.
Oncology Reports | Year: 2016

Postmenopausal women undergoing hormonereplacement therapy containing both progestins and estrogens are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women taking estrogen alone. We recently demonstrated that medroxyprogesterone acetate, a progestin commonly used for hormone-replacement therapy, accelerates development of mammary carcinogenesis in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a) anthracene treated Sprague-Dawley rats. Synthetic antiprogestins used to block the deleterious effects of progestins are themselves associated with toxic side-effects. In order to circumvent this, we used the aforementioned model to identify less toxic natural compounds that may prevent the development of progestin-accelerated tumors. Luteolin, a naturally-occurring flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables, has previously been shown to possess anticancer properties. In our studies, both low (1 mg/kg) and high (25 mg/kg) doses of luteolin significantly suppressed progestin-dependent increases in tumor incidence, while increasing tumor latency and reducing the occurrence of large (>300 mm3) mammary tumors. However, an intermediate dose of luteolin (10 mg/kg) while suppressing the development of large tumors, did not affect either tumor incidence or latency. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissues revealed that all concentrations of luteolin (1, 10, and 25 mg/kg) significantly reduced levels of VEGF within tumors. The suppressive effects of luteolin on tumor incidence and volume, together with its ability to reduce VEGF and blood vessels, persisted even after treatment was terminated. This suggests that luteolin possesses anti angiogenic properties which could mechanistically explain its capacity to control tumor progression. Thus luteolin may be a valuable, non-toxic, naturally-occurring anticancer compound which may potentially be used to combat progestin-accelerated mammary tumors.


PubMed | University of Missouri and IDEXX BioResearch
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Comparative medicine | Year: 2015

Helicobacter spp. are some of the most prevalent bacterial contaminants of laboratory mice. Although abundant data regarding the diseases associated with H. hepaticus infection are available, little is known about the pathogenicity of H. ganmani, which was first isolated in 2001 from the intestines of laboratory mice. The objective of this study was to evaluate the host response to H. ganmani colonization in H. hepaticus disease-resistant C57BL/6 and disease-susceptible A/J and IL10-deficient mice. Mice were inoculated with H. ganmani, H. hepaticus, or Brucella broth. Cecal lesion scores, cecal gene expression, and Helicobacter load were measured at 4 and 90 d after inoculation. At both time points, mice inoculated with H. ganmani had similar or significantly more copies of cecum-associated Helicobacter DNA than did mice inoculated with H. hepaticus. When compared with those of sham-inoculated control mice, cecal lesion scores at 4 and 90 d after inoculation were not significantly greater in H. ganmani-inoculated A/J, C57BL/6, or IL10-deficient mice. Analysis of cecal gene expression demonstrated that H. ganmani infection failed to cause significant elevations of IFN in A/J, C57BL/6, or IL10-deficient mice. However, in IL10-deficient mice, H. ganmani infection was associated with a significant increase in the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL12/23p40. Although H. ganmani infection in this study failed to induce the typhlitis that is the hallmark of H. hepaticus infection, infection with H. ganmani was associated with alterations in inflammatory cytokines in IL10-deficient mice.


PubMed | University of Missouri and IDEXX BioResearch
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oncology reports | Year: 2016

Postmenopausal women undergoing hormone-replacement therapy containing both progestins and estrogens are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women taking estrogen alone. We recently demonstrated that medroxyprogesterone acetate, a progestin commonly used for hormone-replacement therapy, accelerates development of mammary carcinogenesis in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracenetreated Sprague-Dawley rats. Synthetic antiprogestins used to block the deleterious effects of progestins, are themselves associated with toxic side-effects. In order to circumvent this, we used the aforementioned model to identify less toxic natural compounds that may prevent the development of progestin-accelerated tumors. Luteolin, a naturally-occurring flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables, has previously been shown to possess anticancer properties. In our studies, both low (1 mg/kg) and high (25 mg/kg) doses of luteolin significantly suppressed progestin-dependent increases in tumor incidence, while increasing tumor latency and reducing the occurrence of large (>300 mm3) mammary tumors. However, an intermediate dose of luteolin (10 mg/kg), while suppressing the development of large tumors, did not affect either tumor incidence or latency. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissues revealed that all concentrations of luteolin (1, 10, and 25 mg/kg) significantly reduced levels of VEGF within tumors. The suppressive effects of luteolin on tumor incidence and volume, together with its ability to reduce VEGF and blood vessels, persisted even after treatment was terminated. This suggests that luteolin possesses antiangiogenic properties which could mechanistically explain its capacity to control tumor progression. Thus luteolin may be a valuable, non-toxic, naturally-occurring anticancer compound which may potentially be used to combat progestin-accelerated mammary tumors.


PubMed | University of Missouri and IDEXX BioResearch
Type: | Journal: SpringerPlus | Year: 2015

Clinical trials and epidemiological evidence have shown that combined estrogen/progestin hormone replacement therapy, but not estrogen therapy alone, increases breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. Previously we have shown that natural and synthetic progestins, including the widely used synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), increase production of a potent angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in human breast cancer cells, potentially providing an explanation for progestins mechanism of action. Here, we tested the effects of luteolin (LU), a flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables, on inhibiting progestin-dependent VEGF induction and angiogenesis in human breast cancer cells, inhibiting stem cell-like characteristics, as well as breast cancer cell xenograft tumor growth in vivo and expression of angiogenesis markers.Viability of both T47-D and BT-474 cells was measured using sulforhodamine B assays. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to monitor VEGF secretion from breast cancer cells. Progestin-dependent xenograft tumor growth was used to determine LU effects in vivo. CD31 immunohistochemistry was used to determine blood-vessel density in xenograft tumors. CD44 expression, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and mammosphere-formation assays were used to monitor stem cell-like characteristics of breast cancer cells.Luteolin treatment reduced breast cancer cell viability, progestin-dependent VEGF secretion from breast cancer cells, and growth of MPA-dependent human breast cancer cell xenograft tumors in nude mice. LU treatment also decreased xenograft tumor VEGF expression and blood-vessel density. Furthermore, LU blocked MPA-induced acquisition of stem cell-like properties by breast cancer cells.Luteolin effectively blocks progestin-dependent human breast cancer tumor growth and the stem cell-like phenotype in human breast cancer cells.


PubMed | University of Missouri and IDEXX BioResearch
Type: | Journal: Breast cancer (Dove Medical Press) | Year: 2017

Most breast cancer-related deaths from triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) occur following metastasis of cancer cells and development of tumors at secondary sites. Because TNBCs lack the three receptors targeted by current chemotherapeutic regimens, they are typically treated with extremely aggressive and highly toxic non-targeted treatment strategies. Women with TNBC frequently develop metastatic lesions originating from drug-resistant residual cells and have poor prognosis. For this reason, novel therapeutic strategies that are safer and more effective are sought. Luteolin (LU) is a naturally occurring, non-toxic plant compound that has proven effective against several types of cancer. With this in mind, we conducted in vivo and in vitro studies to determine whether LU might suppress metastasis of TNBC. In an in vivo mouse metastasis model, LU suppressed metastasis of human MDA-MB-435 and MDA-MB-231 (4175) LM2 TNBC cells to the lungs. In in vitro assays, LU inhibited cell migration and viability of MDA-MB-435 and MDA-MB-231 (4175) LM2 cells. Further, LU induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 (4175) LM2 cells. Relatively low levels (10 M) of LU significantly inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion in MDA-MB-231 (4175) LM2 cells, suggesting that it has the ability to suppress a potent angiogenic and cell survival factor. In addition, migration of MDA-MB-231 (4175) LM2 cells was inhibited upon exposure to an antibody against the VEGF receptor, KDR, but not by exposure to a VEGF


Collymore C.,King's College | Crim M.J.,IDEXX BioResearch | Lieggi C.,Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Zebrafish | Year: 2016

The presence of subclinical infection or clinical disease in laboratory zebrafish may have a significant impact on research results, animal health and welfare, and transfer of animals between institutions. As use of zebrafish as a model of disease increases, a harmonized method for monitoring and reporting the health status of animals will facilitate the transfer of animals, allow institutions to exclude diseases that may negatively impact their research programs, and improve animal health and welfare. All zebrafish facilities should implement a health monitoring program. In this study, we review important aspects of a health monitoring program, including choice of agents, samples for testing, available testing methodologies, housing and husbandry, cost, test subjects, and a harmonized method for reporting results. Facilities may use these recommendations to implement their own health monitoring program. © 2016 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


PubMed | IDEXX BioResearch
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science : JAALAS | Year: 2016

Sampling of bedding debris within the exhaust systems of ventilated racks may be a mechanism for detecting murine pathogens in colony animals. This study examined the effectiveness of detecting pathogens by PCR analysis of exhaust debris samples collected from ventilated racks of 2 different rack designs, one with unfiltered air flow from within the cage to the air-exhaust pathway, and the other had a filter between the cage and the air-exhaust pathway. For 12 wk, racks were populated with either 1 or 5 cages of mice (3 mice per cage) infected with one of the following pathogens: mouse norovirus (MNV), mouse parvovirus (MPV), mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), Helicobacter spp., Pasteurella pneumotropica, pinworms, Entamoeba muris, Tritrichomonas muris, and fur mites. Pathogen shedding by infected mice was monitored throughout the study. In the filter-containing rack, PCR testing of exhaust plenums yielded negative results for all pathogens at all time points of the study. In the rack with open air flow, pathogens detected by PCR analysis of exhaust debris included MHV, Helicobacter spp., P. pneumotropica, pinworms, enteric protozoa, and fur mites; these pathogens were detected in racks housing either 1 or 5 cages of infected mice. Neither MPV nor MNV was detected in exhaust debris, even though prolonged viral shedding was confirmed. These results demonstrate that testing rack exhaust debris from racks with unfiltered air flow detected MHV, enteric bacteria and parasites, and fur mites. However, this method failed to reliably detect MNV or MPV infection of colony animals.


PubMed | IDEXX BioResearch, University of Illinois at Chicago and University of Arizona
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Comparative medicine | Year: 2016

A group studying acute lung injury observed an increased percentage of neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of mice. BAL was performed, and lung samples were collected sterilely from 5 C57BL/6 mice that had been bred inhouse. Pure colonies of bacteria, initially identified as Bordetella hinzii were cultured from 2 of the 5 mice which had the highest percentages of neutrophils (21% and 26%) in the BAL fluid. Subsequent sequencing of a portion of the ompA gene from this isolate demonstrated 100% homology with the published B. pseudohinzii sequence. We then selected 10 mice from the investigators colony to determine the best test to screen for B. pseudohinzii in the facility. BAL was performed, the left lung lobe was collected for culture and PCR analysis, the right lung lobe and nasal passages were collected for histopathology, an oral swab was collected for culture, and an oral swab and fecal pellets were collected for PCR analysis. B. pseudohinzii was cultured from the oral cavity, lung, or both in 8 of the 10 mice analyzed. All 8 of these mice were fecal PCR positive for B. pseudohinzii; 7 had increased neutrophils (5% to 20%) in the BAL fluid, whereas the 8th mouse had a normal neutrophil percentage (2%). Active bronchopneumonia was not observed, but some infected mice had mild to moderate rhinitis. B. pseudohinzii appears to be a microbial agent of importance in mouse colonies that can confound pulmonary research. Commercial vendors and institutions should consider colony screening, routine reporting, and exclusion of B. pseudohinzii.

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