Idaho Falls, ID, United States
Idaho Falls, ID, United States

The Idaho Military Department consists of the Idaho Army National Guard, the Idaho Air National Guard, and the Idaho Bureau of Homeland Security.Its headquarters are located in Boise. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: phys.org

But new computer simulations, described this week in the journal Physics of Fluids, can better probe the underlying physics, potentially leading to more efficient extraction of oil and gas. With more porous rocks like sandstone, where the pores are as big as a few millimeters, oil and gas companies can more easily extract the fuel by injecting water or steam into the ground, forcing out the oil or gas. "Their physical characteristics are well understood," said Yidong Xia, a computational scientist at Idaho National Laboratory. "There are a lot of well-calibrated mathematical models to design the engineering tools for extracting the oil." But that's not the case for shale. "The difficulty is that the pore size is very small, and most of them are scattered—they're isolated," Xia said. "So if you can fill part of the pores with water, there's no way it can move into other pores." Hydraulic fracturing can create cracks that connect those pores, but without a solid understanding of the pore distribution and structure of the shale, oil and gas companies are working blind. To better understand the physics of how fluids like water, oil and gas flow through such tiny pores, researchers have increasingly turned to computer simulations. Yet those too have been limited. When pores are large, fluid moves as a smooth continuum and models can treat it as such. But with nanoscale pores in shale, the fluid acts more like a collection of particles. In principle, a computer can simulate the behavior of every individual molecule that makes up the fluid, Xia said. But that would take too much computing power to be practical. Instead, Xia and his colleagues used what's called a coarse-grain approach. They modeled the fluid as a collection of particles in which each particle represents a cluster of a few molecules. This dramatically cuts down on how much computational muscle is needed. What also sets these new results apart is the incorporation of high-resolution imagery of shale samples. Researchers at the University of Utah used focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy on a piece of Woodford shale a few millimeters in diameter. The ion beam in this method cuts through the sample, scanning each slice to generate a 3-D image of the rock and its detailed pore structure at the nanometer scale. Those images are then fed into the computer model to simulate fluid flow through the scanned nanostructures. "The combination [of microscopy and simulations] is what really produces meaningful results," Xia said. Still, these kinds of simulations alone won't revolutionize shale oil and gas extraction, he said. You would need a broader understanding of the entire structure of the shale, not just small samples. But, he said, you could take multiple samples throughout the shale and run computer simulations to gain more insight into its physics. To be clear, Xia added, they're not endorsing any particular technology or energy source. As researchers, their focus is to simply better understand the basic physics of shale. Explore further: Team takes deeper look at unconventional oil and gas More information: "Many-body dissipative particle dynamics modeling of fluid flow in fine-grained nanoporous shales," Physics of Fluids May 2, 2017. DOI: 10.1063/1.4981136


News Article | April 14, 2017
Site: www.sej.org

"BOISE, Idaho — A giant aquifer below an eastern Idaho federal nuclear facility is as free of radioactive contamination and other pollutants as it has been in more than six decades of monitoring but the water level of the aquifer is at its lowest ever recorded, according to a U.S. Geological Survey report released this week. Better environmental practices and cleanup work at the 890-square-mile (2,305-square-kilometer) U.S. Department of Energy site that includes the Idaho National Laboratory is paying off, said United States Geological Survey scientist Roy Bartholomay. 'Overall the aquifer is better quality than it has been at the Idaho National Lab,' Bartholomay said. 'There are just some anomalies out there we want to keep an eye on.'" Keith Ridler reports for the Associated Press April 14, 2014.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New shale modeling may lead to more efficient extraction of oil and natural gas WASHINGTON, D.C., May 2, 2017 -- Most of the world's oil and natural gas reserves may be locked up inside the tiny pores comprising shale rock. But current drilling and fracturing methods can't extract this fuel very well, recovering only an estimated 5 percent of oil and 20 percent of gas from shale. That's partly due to a poor understanding of how fluids flow through these small pores, which measure only nanometers across. But new computer simulations, described this week in the journal Physics of Fluids, from AIP Publishing, can better probe the underlying physics, potentially leading to more efficient extraction of oil and gas. With more porous rocks like sandstone, where the pores are as big as a few millimeters, oil and gas companies can more easily extract the fuel by injecting water or steam into the ground, forcing out the oil or gas. "Their physical characteristics are well understood," said Yidong Xia, a computational scientist at Idaho National Laboratory. "There are a lot of well-calibrated mathematical models to design the engineering tools for extracting the oil." But that's not the case for shale. "The difficulty is that the pore size is very small, and most of them are scattered -- they're isolated," Xia said. "So if you can fill part of the pores with water, there's no way it can move into other pores." Hydraulic fracturing can create cracks that connect those pores, but without a solid understanding of the pore distribution and structure of the shale, oil and gas companies are working blind. To better understand the physics of how fluids like water, oil and gas flow through such tiny pores, researchers have increasingly turned to computer simulations. Yet those too have been limited. When pores are large, fluid moves as a smooth continuum and models can treat it as such. But with nanoscale pores in shale, the fluid acts more like a collection of particles. In principle, a computer can simulate the behavior of every individual molecule that makes up the fluid, Xia said. But that would take too much computing power to be practical. Instead, Xia and his colleagues used what's called a coarse-grain approach. They modeled the fluid as a collection of particles in which each particle represents a cluster of a few molecules. This dramatically cuts down on how much computational muscle is needed. What also sets these new results apart is the incorporation of high-resolution imagery of shale samples. Researchers at the University of Utah used focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy on a piece of Woodford shale a few millimeters in diameter. The ion beam in this method cuts through the sample, scanning each slice to generate a 3-D image of the rock and its detailed pore structure at the nanometer scale. Those images are then fed into the computer model to simulate fluid flow through the scanned nanostructures. "The combination [of microscopy and simulations] is what really produces meaningful results," Xia said. Still, these kinds of simulations alone won't revolutionize shale oil and gas extraction, he said. You would need a broader understanding of the entire structure of the shale, not just small samples. But, he said, you could take multiple samples throughout the shale and run computer simulations to gain more insight into its physics. To be clear, Xia added, they're not endorsing any particular technology or energy source. As researchers, their focus is to simply better understand the basic physics of shale. The article, "Many-body dissipative particle dynamics modeling of fluid flow in fine-grained nanoporous shales," is authored by Yidong Xia, Jan Goral, Hai Huang, Ilija Miskovic, Paul Meakin and Milind Deo. The article will appear in Physics of Fluids May 2, 2017 (DOI: 10.1063/1.4981136). After that date, it can be accessed at http://aip. . Physics of Fluids is devoted to the publication of original theoretical, computational, and experimental contributions to the dynamics of gases, liquids, and complex or multiphase fluids. See http://pof. .


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Most of the world's oil and natural gas reserves may be locked up inside the tiny pores comprising shale rock. But current drilling and fracturing methods can't extract this fuel very well, recovering only an estimated 5 percent of oil and 20 percent of gas from shale. That's partly due to a poor understanding of how fluids flow through these small pores, which measure only nanometers across. But new computer simulations, described this week in the journal Physics of Fluids, from AIP Publishing, can better probe the underlying physics, potentially leading to more efficient extraction of oil and gas. With more porous rocks like sandstone, where the pores are as big as a few millimeters, oil and gas companies can more easily extract the fuel by injecting water or steam into the ground, forcing out the oil or gas. "Their physical characteristics are well understood," said Yidong Xia, a computational scientist at Idaho National Laboratory. "There are a lot of well-calibrated mathematical models to design the engineering tools for extracting the oil." But that's not the case for shale. "The difficulty is that the pore size is very small, and most of them are scattered -- they're isolated," Xia said. "So if you can fill part of the pores with water, there's no way it can move into other pores." Hydraulic fracturing can create cracks that connect those pores, but without a solid understanding of the pore distribution and structure of the shale, oil and gas companies are working blind. To better understand the physics of how fluids like water, oil and gas flow through such tiny pores, researchers have increasingly turned to computer simulations. Yet those too have been limited. When pores are large, fluid moves as a smooth continuum and models can treat it as such. But with nanoscale pores in shale, the fluid acts more like a collection of particles. In principle, a computer can simulate the behavior of every individual molecule that makes up the fluid, Xia said. But that would take too much computing power to be practical. Instead, Xia and his colleagues used what's called a coarse-grain approach. They modeled the fluid as a collection of particles in which each particle represents a cluster of a few molecules. This dramatically cuts down on how much computational muscle is needed. What also sets these new results apart is the incorporation of high-resolution imagery of shale samples. Researchers at the University of Utah used focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy on a piece of Woodford shale a few millimeters in diameter. The ion beam in this method cuts through the sample, scanning each slice to generate a 3-D image of the rock and its detailed pore structure at the nanometer scale. Those images are then fed into the computer model to simulate fluid flow through the scanned nanostructures. "The combination [of microscopy and simulations] is what really produces meaningful results," Xia said. Still, these kinds of simulations alone won't revolutionize shale oil and gas extraction, he said. You would need a broader understanding of the entire structure of the shale, not just small samples. But, he said, you could take multiple samples throughout the shale and run computer simulations to gain more insight into its physics. To be clear, Xia added, they're not endorsing any particular technology or energy source. As researchers, their focus is to simply better understand the basic physics of shale.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

CleanTech Alliance announced that Dr. Mark Peters, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will keynote the CleanTech Innovation Showcase 2017 on June 26 in Seattle. Dr. Peters is the first of several keynote speakers to be announced for the event, which is sponsored by The Boeing Company and Seattle City Light. Idaho National Laboratory’s mission focuses on nuclear energy, national and homeland security, and energy and environmental science and technology. The lab has an annual budget exceeding $900 million and employs more than 4,000 scientists, engineers and support staff across a number of facilities. In addition to his role as Lab Director, Dr. Peters also serves as President of the Battelle Energy Alliance and is a senior DOE advisor on nuclear energy technology, research and development programs and nuclear waste policy. Prior to joining INL, Dr. Peters served as Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Global Security at Argonne National Laboratory. Held June 26, 2017, at the Bell Harbor International Conference Center in Seattle, the CleanTech Innovation Showcase is the region’s premier one-day conference focused on technology and business innovation. The event convenes 500+ cleantech industry leaders, investors, policymakers and media. More than 75 companies were featured at last year’s event, including 24 presenting companies. “Idaho National Laboratory and its sister labs play a critical role in advancing the technology innovations that keep our global energy supply and environment safe and resilient,” said J. Thomas Ranken, CleanTech Alliance President and CEO. “Dr. Mark Peters is a central figure in both nuclear energy and national security. He frequently advises U.S. and foreign governments and will share that same expertise with CleanTech Innovation Showcase attendees.” The CleanTech Innovation Showcase spotlights industry leaders, emerging companies and research institutions. The Boeing Company and Seattle City Light are principal sponsors of the event. “The CleanTech Innovation Showcase delivers direct access to the region’s top clean energy and sustainability experts alongside the latest technology innovations and demonstrations,” said Bill McSherry, Vice President, Government Operations at Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “Boeing is proud to be a significant supporter of this event, and is looking forward to seeing what we can leverage from the next generation of clean technology innovations and initiatives.” “Seattle City Light serves an innovative city that aspires to be entirely carbon neutral by 2050, and we look to new solutions to help us meet these challenges,” said Sephir Hamilton, Engineering and Technology Innovation Interim Officer for Seattle City Light. “It’s exciting for Seattle City Light to support the growth of green technology businesses and jobs that provide software, hardware and infrastructure solutions for City Light and our neighboring utilities.” CleanTech Innovation Showcase registration is now open. Additional branding opportunities are available through several customizable sponsorship and exhibit packages. Contact Kate Kavuma at kate(at)cleantechalliance(dot)org or 206-389-7255 to build a package to meet your branding needs. About the CleanTech Alliance CleanTech Alliance represents more than 300 member companies and organizations across the Northwest region. Founded in 2007 by business leaders, the organization facilitates the generation and growth of cleantech companies, jobs, products and services to advance the cleantech economy. CleanTech Alliance offers a range of business services and benefits uniquely designed to help businesses gain visibility, access services at a lower cost and benefit from public policy. Learn more at http://www.CleanTechAlliance.org.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

CleanTech Alliance announced Dr. Johanna Wolfson as the latest keynote speaker for the CleanTech Innovation Showcase 2017 to be held on June 26 in Seattle. Dr. Wolfson serves as Tech-to-Market Director within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Together with her team, she is reimagining the energy innovation landscape and improving public-private sector collaboration for technology transfer. EERE's Tech-to-Market programs address the underlying structural challenges that weaken the American innovation ecosystem by removing the barriers that prevent promising advanced energy technologies from being explored by the market. For example, Tech-to-Market’s experimental initiatives are bringing entrepreneurs and small businesses into world-class DOE national laboratory facilities to build their products in a way that engages outside industry and prepares them for investment. Dr. Wolfson leads a variety of initiatives, including the Small Business Vouchers pilot, the Cleantech University Prize (Cleantech UP), and Energy I-Corps. The CleanTech Innovation Showcase 2017 will explore how the convergence of research, policy and industry is driving innovation across clean energy and sustainable technologies. Dr. Wolfson is the latest keynote speaker announced. She is joined by Dr. Mark Peters, Director of the Idaho National Laboratory, and Steven Martin, Vice President and Chief Digital Officer of GE Energy Connections. “Dr. Johanna Wolfson and the full lineup of keynote speakers demonstrates the high caliber program offered by the CleanTech Innovation Showcase, which has grown into one of the leading cleantech innovation events available today,” said J. Thomas Ranken, President & CEO of the CleanTech Alliance. “Last year’s program attracted industry leaders and investors from four continents. This year’s program is expected to greatly exceed that reach to drive even more impact.” Before joining EERE, Dr. Wolfson was with the Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems in Boston where she led TechBridge, an innovative program for startups that worked to mitigate risks for investors and strategic partners by providing demonstration and validation services from applied research laboratories. She earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from MIT, where she conducted research on photo-induced solid-state dynamics. Held June 26, 2017, at the Bell Harbor International Conference Center in Seattle, the CleanTech Innovation Showcase is the region’s premier one-day conference focused on technology and business innovation. The event convenes 500+ cleantech industry leaders, investors, policymakers and media. More than 75 companies were featured at last year’s event, including 24 presenting companies. CleanTech Innovation Showcase registration is now open. Additional branding opportunities are available through several customizable sponsorship and exhibit packages. Contact Kate Roze at kate(at)cleantechalliance.org or 206-389-7255 to meet your branding needs. About the CleanTech Alliance CleanTech Alliance represents more than 300 member companies and organizations across the Northwest region. Founded in 2007 by business leaders, the organization facilitates the generation and growth of cleantech companies, jobs, products and services to advance the cleantech economy. CleanTech Alliance offers a range of business services and benefits uniquely designed to help businesses gain visibility, access services at a lower cost and benefit from public policy. Learn more at http://www.CleanTechAlliance.org.


News Article | April 11, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

The unit is scheduled to begin operating later this year. The first of the graphite spheres was loaded within the reactor’s core on April 5. Work on two demonstration HTR-PM units at China Huaneng Group’s Shidaowan site near Weihai city in China’s Shandong province, began in December 2012. The plant will initially comprise twin HTR-PM reactor modules driving a single 210 MWe steam turbine. A proposal to construct two 600 MWe HTR plants – each featuring three twin reactor and turbine units – at Ruijin city in China’s Jiangxi province passed a preliminary feasibility review in early 2015. The design of the Ruijin HTRs is based on the smaller Shidaowan demonstration HTR-PM. Construction of the Ruijin reactors is expected to start next year, with grid connection in 2021. China has been actively promoting its HTR technology overseas and has already signed agreements with other countries – including Saudi Arabia, South Africa and the UAE – to consider the construction of HTGR plants. Last August, China Nuclear Energy Engineering Group signed an agreement with Indonesia’s National Atomic Energy Agency (Batan) to jointly develop an HTGR in Indonesia. (WNN) Each of the graphite spheres for the HTR-PM is 60 millimeters in diameter and weighs about 0.192 kilograms. Every fuel element contains 7 grams of heavy metal. The enrichment of U-235 is 8.5%. The uranium kernels – about 0.5mm in diameter – are coated by three layers of pyro-carbon and one layer of silicon carbon. The coated fuel particles are dispersed in matrix graphite of pyrolytic carbon PyC which is 5cm in diameter. Surrounding the fuel-containing graphite matrix is a 5mm thick graphite layer. The reactor cavity will be filled with a total of 245,318 fuel elements, to a depth of over 11 meters. In 2005, a prototyping fuel-production facility was constructed at the Institute for Nuclear and New Energy Technology with an annual capacity of 100,000 fuel elements. In an innovative partnership tiny X-Energy, a start-up, has teamed with one of America’s biggest nuclear utilities, Southern Co., to collaborate on the development and commercialization of the design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. X Energy, LLC (X-energy) announced March 16 that it has commenced the conceptual design phase for its Xe-100 high temperature gas-cooled (HTGR) pebble bed modular reactor. The company also welcomes Clint Medlock, a Southern Nuclear employee, as Program Management Consultant. X-energy held a Conceptual Design Readiness Review on March 8 to validate the baseline design parameters, preparatory documentation, analysis tools, scope of the proposed conceptual design phase (including all planned deliverables), management processes and overall team readiness to proceed on to the next phase of Xe-100 reactor development. An external panel comprised of industry experts from Southern Nuclear, Burns & McDonnell, and Technology Insights was engaged to evaluate X-energy’s preparedness to enter the conceptual design phase. As part of the conceptual design, X-energy and Southern Nuclear deepened their relationship by engaging Clint Medlock on X-energy’s Xe-100 development team as Program Management Consultant. Medlock, a 12-year Southern Nuclear veteran, has 27 years’ nuclear industry experience and has managed several large nuclear design and construction projects. “I am excited to have Clint as part of our X-energy leadership team. His nuclear experience, input, and guidance has and will continue to be invaluable,” said Ghaffarian. “We value our partnership with Southern Nuclear as we move through conceptual design and look towards deployment.” In August 2016, Southern Nuclear and X-energy entered into a Memorandum of Understanding as a step toward commercializing and deploying the Xe-100. Triso Fuel Hold the Keys to the X-Energy / Southern Partnership Neither Southern nor X-Energy explained in their press statements in August 2016 where their R&D work intersects. The technological link between the two projects is Triso fuel. Some GEN IV designs of very high temperature molten salt reactors specify the use of it. The pebble bed design depends entirely on Triso fuel. According to a 2013 report by World Nuclear News, research teams at two US national laboratories ORNL, INL) have found that irradiated carbon-coated Triso fuel particles are even more resistant to extreme temperatures than previously thought, offering potential benefits for reactor safety. TRISO fuel developed and tested at the Idaho National Laboratory was enriched to just over 9% U235. The pebble bed and molten salt designs share another characteristic, and that is both have a negative temperature coefficient that automatically shuts down the reactor if temperatures get too high. The Integral Fast Reactor, a sodium cooled design, also has this safety feature. The structure and spherical shape of TRISO fuel means that it maintains its integrity under extreme heat conditions. TRISO fuel was originally developed in the 1980s and is currently being manufactured in the USA. TRISO fuels are fabricated by BWX Technologies Nuclear Operations Group (Lynchburg, Virginia) that can be formed for use in both the prismatic-block version of the HTGR and the pebble-bed HTGR, depending on the selected reactor design. (Bloomberg) Urenco Ltd., the world’s second-biggest maker of atomic fuel, is is developing a radically smaller nuclear reactors in order to boost demand for its services. The company is developing, in conjunction with Amec Foster Wheeler Plc, a generation of small, modular reactors called “U-Batteries,” CEO Thomas Haeberle told the Bloomberg wire service the firm’s design is expected to be able to generate 10MW of electrical power or for use as process heat. The U-Battery is being developed for small towns and industries operating in areas beyond the reach of large nuclear plants. While a typical reactor generating a 1,000 MW of electrical power would need pervasive grid access and dense populations for profitability, a U-Battery could make economic sense even in more remote areas with less concentrated economic activity. Haeberle said. “It will enable nuclear to grow in areas that big nuclear wouldn’t have access to.” Central to the U-Battery design is its so-called TRISO fuel, a three-layered sphere with a uranium kernel that can withstand very high operating temperatures according to the web site prospectus. The reactor uses helium to move heat via a primary loop from the reactor directly to a turbine or to secondary loop in a steam generator. The company is in talks about conducting trials on a prototype in Canada and Poland and is about to start the licensing process, the CEO said. The construction company Laing O’Rourke Plc as well as shipbuilder Cammell Laird Holdings Plc are also part of the group developing U-battery. (Financial Mail) South Africa a new initiative to revive the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor project that was abandoned in 2010 after years of development. The reasons for halting the project were given as cost overruns, missed deadlines and lack of an anchor customer. Problems were also identified with the efficiency of the reactor for baseload electrical power. Applications for process heat were not fully explored by the R&D program. The intellectual property of the PBMR remained with Eskom, which is revisiting it. Brian Molefe, CEO of Eskom, has asked his team to look again at the PBMR and the new plan is to develop a reactor that is simpler and more efficient than the original design. A small-scale nuclear reactor would fit into a grid mix that includes the intermittency of renewable power. He says the funding for this research is limited and the project is not yet at the stage where he can give a cost estimate for design, proof of concept and commercialization. (Deutsche Welle) President Jacob Zuma’s recent cabinet reshuffle removed key political figures from government who are opposed to proposals to build more nuclear reactors. These are full size reactors based on conventional light water technologies. The political move also set financial markets on edge and put the South African currency into a new tailspin. South Africa is now being gripped by fresh controversy over plans for expanding its nuclear power program. The new finance minister Malusi Gigaba denied that any deal had been inked with Rosatom for 9.6 GW of nuclear power. The Rosatom offer is for eight light water type VVER 1200 MW units. Gigaba’s predecessor as finance minister, Pravin Gordan, who was fired last week, was a strong opponent of the Russian proposal and the development of nuclear energy in general, largely over cost issues. The new nuclear reactors are expected to cost more than (65 billion euros, $73 billion). Gordan repeatedly warned of the high costs of nuclear projects believing they would plunge South Africa deeper into debt. The ministers for energy and for public works in the old cabinet also lost their jobs in the recent purge of political appointees. Hartmut Winkler, professor of Physics at the University of Johannesburg, told DW that the change in finance ministers is politically motivated. “Zuma fired Gordan so that he could replace him with someone who wouldn’t raise any major objections to the planned nuclear deal,” he said. Rosatom announced that it had sealed a “strategic partnership” with South Africa in 2014 when President Jacob Zuma visited his Russian counterpart Vladmir Putin in the Kremlin. The plan was to build eight nuclear reactors in South Africa with a combined output of 9.6 GW by 2030. News media in South Africa have reported connections between President Zuma and family members of his close supporters. Critics of the nuclear deal claim that the huge project will provide Zuma with a nearly bottomless bucket of patronage for his supporters. DW reported that its research indicated that Rosatom is the favorite to secure the deal. However, Nesca, the state-run nuclear energy corporation, has denied this allegation. The newspaper did not reveal its sources nor publish any documents to back up its claim. South Africa was in the process of collecting bids ESKOM, the state owned public utility said in a written statement. Companies could submit bids until April 28. A number of companies have ready promised do this including major suppliers of nuclear technology from China, France, Russia and South Korea. Eskom would send the paperwork to the finance ministry and the cabinet and was hoping approval for the project before the end of the year. ESKOM has released and canceled tenders for nuclear energy in the past with the cancellations attributed to the lack of financing for the project. South Africa’s economy is in trouble and the currency has been devalued. It’s bond rating now has a “junk” rating and some investment analysts say that downward move is long overdue. The ability of the nation to pay for a $73 billion energy program is beyond its reach even with 50% financing from a vendor taking an equity stake in the project. South Africa’s ruling party on April 9 said the government will have to re-think its costly and highly contentious nuclear expansion program following last week’s relegation of the country’s creditworthiness to junk. Within days of each other, two of the world’s major rating agencies, Fitch and Standard & Poor’s, downgraded South African sovereign debt to junk status after President Jacob Zuma’s dramatic ministerial shake-up that saw respected finance minister Pravin Gordhan axed. In 2010 South Africa formulated plans to expand its nuclear power capacity, plans estimated to cost around R1-trillion ($73-billion). The politics of the structure of South Africa’s economy is one of the things that keeps the government in a state of near perpetual turmoil. The new finance minister Malusi Gigaba, told CNBC reporters last week, “The issue of radical economic transformation arises from a criticism that for quite a long time the structure of the South African economy has not been changed. We have not paid sufficient attention to the real economy, to industrializing the economy, to ensuring that we create entrepreneurs and industrialists, particularly among black people.” “No-one can properly define this term” Peter Attard-Montalto, emerging markets economist at Nomura, told CNBC. He added that it was likely to imply initiatives such as faster land redistribution, forced share ownership changes and higher wealth taxes. The goal is to address the fact that around 10% of the population – a largely white cohort – still own at least 90 to 95% of all wealth, according to widely cited research from REDI published last June. The report also made allegations of widespread corruption by President Zuma and his supporters. It isn’t clear whether Gigaba plans for the government to seize assets from the wealthy, but even if he does, it may cripple the very industries that would be the customers for the electricity that would come from the planned nuclear reactor program.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

CleanTech Alliance announced that Steven Martin, Vice President and Chief Digital Officer of GE Energy Connections, will keynote the CleanTech Innovation Showcase 2017 on June 26 in Seattle. Martin is the latest CleanTech Innovation Showcase keynote speaker to be announced, joining Dr. Mark Peters, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory. The event is sponsored by Washington State University, The Boeing Company and Seattle City Light. GE Energy Connections designs and deploys leading technologies that transport, convert, automate and optimize energy to ensure safe, efficient and reliable electrical power. The company recently announced an effort to strengthen the electrical grid for half a billion people in India. The project will develop an 848 mile energy highway to address the country’s growing power needs. Initial transmission was completed in early 2017, delivering reliable energy to an estimated 46 percent of the country’s population. As Vice President and Chief Digital Officer, Martin leads GE Energy Connections’ efforts to develop end-to-end software and cloud solutions to help customer digitization efforts. This includes the activation of product, service and solution roadmaps, and designing new customer experiences and business models. Prior to joining GE, Martin served as General Manager and Chief Data Scientist for Azure at Microsoft. Over his 20-year career, he has held leadership positions across engineering, product management, venture capital and strategy. Held June 26, 2017, at the Bell Harbor International Conference Center in Seattle, the CleanTech Innovation Showcase is the region’s premier one-day conference focused on technology and business innovation. The event convenes 500+ cleantech industry leaders, investors, policymakers and media. More than 75 companies were featured at last year’s event, including 24 presenting companies. “GE is continually named a global leader in energy innovation. Steven Martin’s presentation will demonstrate how clean technology innovations can improve quality of life across the globe while shaping our economy,” said J. Thomas Ranken, President and CEO of the CleanTech Alliance. “The topic aligns perfectly with the CleanTech Innovation Showcase as well as the overarching mission of the CleanTech Alliance.” The CleanTech Innovation Showcase spotlights industry leaders, emerging companies and research institutions. The Boeing Company, Seattle City Light and Washington State University are principal sponsors of the event. “Partnering with clean technology innovators is a critical part of Washington State University’s strategy for becoming a top 25 research university in the U.S.,” said Dr. Michael Wolcott, Director of the Institute for Sustainable Design and Acting Director for the Composite Materials and Engineering Center at Washington State University. “The CleanTech Innovation Showcase gathers these innovators into a single location to spotlight the future of clean energy and sustainable technologies. It’s a great opportunity for us to meet with current and future partners from across the U.S., Canada and beyond.” CleanTech Innovation Showcase registration is now open. Additional branding opportunities are available through several customizable sponsorship and exhibit packages. Contact Kate Kavuma at kate(at)cleantechalliance(dot)org or 206-389-7255 to build a package to meet your branding needs. About the CleanTech Alliance CleanTech Alliance represents more than 300 member companies and organizations across the Northwest region. Founded in 2007 by business leaders, the organization facilitates the generation and growth of cleantech companies, jobs, products and services to advance the cleantech economy. CleanTech Alliance offers a range of business services and benefits uniquely designed to help businesses gain visibility, access services at a lower cost and benefit from public policy. Learn more at http://www.CleanTechAlliance.org.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

The Department of Energy has a mission to ensure America's prosperity and security by addressing energy and environmental challenges. This Phase I project aims to produce domestic, economic and environmentally responsible biodiesel fuel from brown grease, a waste that is currently disposed in landfills or incinerated. The conversion of "brown grease" from wastewater treatment plant’s fats oils and greases (WWTP FOG) has the potential to generate over 500 million gallons of biodiesel per year. The proposed project will test both pretreatment by supercritical fluids of the brown grease as well as development of robust catalysts using supercritical process and a final cleaning of the product using supercritical fluids to produce a high quality industrial biodiesel. CF Tech is teaming with Idaho National Laboratory, a pioneer in supercritical and catalyst reactions including their patented SSC process, and Mr. Richard Madrak, President of Waste Resources Recovery, Inc., a consultant within the industry. In prior work, CF Tech and INL have successfully used supercritical fluids in similar developments. Commercial application and benefits of this successful technology will be to manufacture and install conversion plants at wastewater treatment plants around the country to reduce landfill and incineration disposal, while producing high value crude bio-oil. To be economically viable, biofuels need low cost feedstocks, WWTP brown grease meets that requirement as a no cost or negative value feedstock. Keywords: Wastewater treatment plants, brown grease, FOG, Free fatty acids, fats oils and greases, Supercritical, Carbon dioxide, Critical Fluids, Liquid fuel, Bio-fuel, Bio-oil, Catalysts, supercritical solid catalysts, SSC Process Members of Congress: CF Technologies, Inc. of Hyde Park, MA has proposed developing technologies to convert rancid no-value, environmentally adverse brown grease from waste water treatment plants into high quality, valued biodiesel fuel.


Runde W.H.,Los Alamos National Laboratory | Mincher B.J.,Idaho National Laboratory
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2011

The preparation and characterization methods for the higher oxidation states of americium are presented. Yanir and co-workers successfully prepared Am(IV) in concentrated phosphoric acid and pyrophosphate, while Myasoedov and co-workers reported its quantitative preparation in 8-15M phosphoric acid by anodic oxidation. Pentavalent americium is predominantly prepared in near-neutral and alkaline solution. Oxidizing agents, such as ozone, peroxydisulfate, or hypochlorite have been used to oxidize Am(III) to Am(V) under these conditions. It can also be obtained by reducing Am(VI) with bromide. Meyer and co-workers obtained pentavalent americium in solution by adding an alkaline solution of ferricyanide to a Am(III) hydroxide. Pure AmO 2 + solutions free of Am3+ can be also obtained by using selective solvent extraction from mixed valence solutions. Hexavalent americium can be prepared in dilute acids or in alkaline media.

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