Arlington, VA, United States
Arlington, VA, United States

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Trademark
ICx Technologies and GHC Technologies Inc. | Date: 2011-02-01

testing instruments used in analyzing and detecting pathogens, toxins, nucleic acids and proteins for scientific and medical research; detection devices, namely, instruments using rapid polymerase chain reaction and rapid immunoassay used in analyzing and detecting pathogens, toxins, nucleic acids and proteins for scientific and medical research.


Rich R.L.,University of Utah | Quinn J.G.,ICx Technologies | Morton T.,Biologic Software Pty Ltd. | Stepp J.D.,Genzyme | Myszka D.G.,University of Utah
Analytical Biochemistry | Year: 2010

We have developed a novel analyte injection method for the SensíQ Pioneer surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor referred to as " FastStep." By merging buffer and sample streams immediately prior to the reaction flow cells, the instrument is capable of automatically generating a two- or threefold dilution series (of seven or five concentrations, respectively) from a single analyte sample. Using sucrose injections, we demonstrate that the production of each concentration within the step gradient is highly reproducible. For kinetic studies, we developed analysis software that utilizes the sucrose responses to automatically define the concentration of analyte at any point during the association phase. To validate this new approach, we compared the results of standard and FastStep injections for ADP binding to a target kinase and a panel of compounds binding to carbonic anhydrase II. Finally, we illustrate how FastStep can be used in a primary screening mode to obtain a full concentration series of each compound in a fragment library. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Hakem I.F.,Carnegie Mellon University | Leech A.M.,ICx Technologies | Johnson J.D.,ICx Technologies | Donahue S.J.,ICx Technologies | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the American Chemical Society | Year: 2010

Chemical modification of nanoparticles or particlelike systems is ubiquitously being used to facilitate specific pharmaceutical functionalities or physicochemical attributes of nanocrystals, proteins, enzymes, or other particlelike systems. Often the modification process is incomplete and the functional activity of the product depends upon the distribution of functional ligands among the different particles in the system. Here, the distribution function describing the spread of ligands in particlelike systems undergoing partial modification reactions is derived and validated against a conjugated enzyme model system by use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). The distribution function is shown to be applicable to describe the distribution of ligands in a wide range of particlelike systems (such as enzymes, dendrimers, or inorganic nanocrystals) and is used to establish guidelines for the synthesis of uniformly modified particle systems even at low reaction efficiencies. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


Patent
ICx Technologies | Date: 2010-06-23

A method for linearizing a radiation detector is provided, the method including measuring a pulse height spectrum of a predetermined radiation source, identifying at least one spectrum template for the predetermined radiation source, and determining a linearization function by comparing the measured pulse height spectrum with the at least one identified spectrum template. The at least one spectrum template is a predefined synthesized energy spectrum for the predetermined radiation source and for the corresponding radiation detector. Further, a detector for measuring one or more types of radiation is provided, the detector being adapted for transforming the measured pulse height spectrum in an energy-calibrated spectrum, the transformation including a linearization step, where a linearization function used with the linearization step is determined according to the inventive method.


The invention refers to an apparatus for detecting neutron radiation, preferably thermal neutrons, comprising a gamma ray scintillator, said scintillator comprising an inorganic material with an attenuation length Lg of less than 10 cm, preferably less than 5 cm for gamma rays of 5 MeV energy in order to provide for high gamma ray stopping power for energetic gamma rays within the gamma ray scintillator, the gamma ray scintillator further comprising components with a product of neutron capture cross section and concentration leading to an absorption length L_(n) for thermal neutrons which is larger than 0,5 cm but smaller than five times the attenuation length Lg, preferably smaller than two times the attenuation length L_(g) for 5 MeV gammas in the said scintillator, the neutron absorbing components of the gamma ray scintillator releasing the energy deployed in the excited nuclei after neutron capture mainly via gamma radiation, the gamma ray scintillator having a diameter or edge length of at least 50% of Lg, preferably of at least Lg, in order to absorb an essential part of the gamma ray energy released after neutron capture in the scintillator, the apparatus further comprising a light detector, optically coupled to the gamma ray scintillator in order to detect the amount of light in the gamma ray scintillator, the apparatus further comprising an evaluation device coupled to the light detector, said device being able to determine the amount of light, detected by the light detector for one scintillation event, that amount being in a known relation to the energy deployed by gamma radiation in the gamma ray scintillator, where the evaluation device is configured to classify detected radiation as neutrons when the measured total gamma energy E_(sum) is above 2,614 MeV.


Patent
ICx Technologies | Date: 2010-01-20

Provided is a detector module for measuring one or more types of radiation, in particular X-ray, gamma ray, or nuclear particle radiation, comprising a detection unit, an analog-to-digital converter (50), an information processing device (40), and a memory device for storing the position of the detector module (Fig.2). The detector module comprises at least one light-emitting diode (LED) (25), optically connected with the detection unit for stabilizing the detector unit. Further, the invention provides a stanchion, in particular a portable stanchion, whereby the stanchion comprises a inventive detector module. Yet further, a (wireless) network of detector modules is provided, whereby each detector module is mounted within a stanchion.


Trademark
ICx Technologies | Date: 2011-05-24

testing instruments used in analyzing and detecting pathogens, toxins, nucleic acids and proteins for scientific and medical research and facility security; detection devices, namely, instruments using rapid polymerase chain reaction and rapid immonoassay used in analyzing and detecting pathogens, toxins, nucleic acids and proteins for scientific and medical research and facility security.


Patent
ICx Technologies | Date: 2010-01-20

The invention relates to a detector module for measuring one or more types of radiation, comprising a detection unit, an analog-to-digital converter (50), an information processing device (40) performing a method of calibrating, stabilizing and linearizing the radiation signal, and a communication network interface (30A), whereby the information processing device performs a method of transmitting the calibrated, stabilized, linearized, and digitized radiation signal via the communication network interface to an analysis device (Fig.2). Furthermore, the invention relates to an analysis device for analyzing digital data, provided by the detector module data. Using at least one detector module and an analysis device a (wireless) network of detector modules can be provided.


News Article | May 22, 2007
Site: www.wired.com

Airport screeners at six of the nation’s busiest airports are testing out handheld explosive detectors designed by ICx Technologies to check sealed bottles of liquids for explosives.  The six airports testing or planning to test the special wands include Miami International, Newark Liberty International, Detroit Metro, Los Angeles International, Las Vegas McCarran International and Boston Logan International. It’s not clear exactly HOW the tests are being conducted since no one is actually allowed to bring bottles of liquid — at least ones that are more than 3 ounces — through airport security. I’ve put in a call to figure that conundrum out. UPDATE: Transportation Security Administration spokesman Christopher White says the detectors are being tested on the 3-1-1 bags (pictured at right) and on allowed containers such as breast milk and baby food.  He’s unsure if the tests include covert testing of real explosives, but says the department is excited by the performance of the technology in the labs. Those jonesing to bring bottles of wine or water on planes shouldn’t rejoice quite yet, according to TSA Chief Technology Officer Mike Golden. "Though we do not anticipate changes to the liquid ban in the near future, this flexible and accurate new technology gives an important additional tool to our security officers," Golden said in a press release. THREAT LEVEL is proud to announce that it is still amused that passengers discard their dangerous bottles of water in trash cans near the screening lanes.

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