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The annual American Thoracic Society International Conference wrapped up this week. Here's a look at some of the newest research and stories from this year's conference ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Thousands of critical care and pulmonology specialists from across the world gathered this week for the American Thoracic Society International Conference in Washington, D.C., to share research, medical developments and best practices for patient care. Here, we highlight a few standouts. The value of rapid sepsis treatment Published in The New England Journal of Medicine this week, the study looks at the controversy surrounding how quickly sepsis must be treated. Using data from 185 hospitals on patients with sepsis and septic shock, researchers found that faster administration of care was linked with lower mortality. The study team included Michigan Medicine researchers and University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovatio members Hallie Prescott, M.D., assistant professor of internal medicine, and Theodore Iwashyna, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine. Both time to antibiotics and time to "three-hour bundle" completion were associated with lower risk-adjusted mortality. For every additional hour of delay in these treatments, odds of mortality increased by 4 percent. "This is the largest study to date looking at time to antibiotics in sepsis treatment," Prescott says. "It was made possible as a result of patient-level data collected in New York as part of new statewide sepsis regulations, known as Rory's Regulations." These regulations were put in place after 12-year-old Rory Staunton died in 2012 of unrecognized sepsis. The regulations require hospitals to develop and implement protocols for sepsis recognition and treatment, as well as to report data on all patients recognized to have sepsis starting in 2014. The core elements in the sepsis protocols were the delivery of antibiotics, measurement of lactate and collection of blood cultures within three hours of patients arriving. These three treatments are known as the three-hour bundle. The study tested whether earlier treatment was associated with better outcomes among patients who presented to an emergency department and were treated within 12 hours. "We found that we can reduce avoidable deaths by treating patients with sepsis and septic shock more quickly upon their arrival to the emergency department," Prescott says. "These findings argue that hospitals and health care systems should invest in infrastructure to get antibiotics to patients as soon as possible -- just as we get patients with heart attacks to the catheterization lab as soon as possible. With each hour of delay, patients have a greater risk of death." Predicting mortality and functional outcomes in the ICU New research from the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, published in JAMA, analyzed how well intensive care unit physicians and nurses can predict six-month patient mortality and morbidity. The authors say care teams' predictions can influence ICU decision-making, but it is not known if these predictions are accurate. To probe the issue, the research team enrolled patients who spent at least three days in the ICU from October 2013 to May 2014 and required mechanical ventilation, vasopressors or both. Patients were treated across five ICUs in three hospitals in Philadelphia. Of the 303 enrolled patients, 299 were tracked to a six-month follow-up. At that time, 169 were alive. Concurrently, the researchers had 47 physicians and 128 nurses predict the patients' in-hospital mortality and six-month functional outcomes, including mortality, return to original residence, ability to toilet independently, ability to climb 10 stairs independently and ability to remember most things, think clearly and solve day-to-day problems. The findings: Physicians most accurately predicted six-month mortality, while nurses most accurately predicted patients' in-hospital mortality. The physicians and nurses both least-accurately predicted cognitive recovery. Both showed higher accuracy when they were confident about their predictions. The research team notes that accuracy in predictions varied depending on the outcome and confidence of the predictor, and additional research would help in understanding prognostic estimates. At the conference, the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute released a COPD National Action Plan, emphasizing the importance of the disease. It outlines key goals, including raising public awareness of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, advancing research, improving patient care and health delivery, and developing management strategies for patients. "Most people don't realize that COPD is actually a manageable disease," said Meilan Han, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine at Michigan Medicine, medical director of the U-M Women's Respiratory Health Program and member of the stakeholder group that formulated the action plan, at the time of the plan's release. "The plan outlines the importance public awareness plays in this disease. So many people go undiagnosed, but perhaps having more education around their symptoms would prompt them to reach out to their physician for care." Some of the action plan's key goals for awareness and treatment of COPD are to: "As a researcher, physician and advocate for patients with this disease, I know I speak for myself and the committee when I say that we hope this plan helps create additional awareness for COPD and undiagnosed patients receive the care they need," Han said. "For those already diagnosed, we hope to continue to provide high-quality education and health care to help them manage this incurable disease."


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Last month, representatives from Rendina Healthcare Real Estate joined Clara Maass Medical Center CEO Mary Ellen, hospital employees, and town officials to celebrate the grand opening of the 87,000 square foot medical office/ICU addition in Belleville. The facility was developed by Rendina as part of its ongoing relationship with RWJBarnabas Health, New Jersey’s largest health system. Two years after breaking ground in early 2015, the new ICU addition opened to patients in April. As the new front entrance to the hospital, the facility houses 43,000 square feet of Class-A physician office space and a state-of-the-art, 32-bed ICU, among other amenities. Speaking at the ceremony, Hospital CEO Mary Ellen Clyne highlighted benefits the ambitious expansion will provide to the community. “Whether the patients would stay here or need service that would require going to one of our affiliate hospitals, such as a trauma center or burn unit, we can take care of anyone who would come through the doors,” said Ms. Clyne. Steve Barry, Executive Vice President of Business Development and Leasing for Rendina, praised the collaborative effort need to complete such a monumental task. “To see such an important project become a reality is incredibly rewarding for our team. We are proud to partner with RWJBarnabas Health on a new facility that will further enhance the high quality care that is provided at Clara Maass Medical Center.” Located in Belleville, N.J., Clara Maass Medical Center, an RWJBarnabas Health facility, provides a complete continuum of care to residents of northern New Jersey. Clara Maass’ centers and services include The Health and Wellness Center, Nuclear Medicine, The Cancer Center at Clara Maass, Adult Cardiac Services including Diagnostic Services, Cardiac Catheterization, Elective and Emergency Angioplasty and Rehabilitation, The Pain Management Center, The Joint & Spine Institute, a Vascular Center, Same Day Surgery, The Wound Center at Clara Maass, The Center for Sleep Disorders, The Bariatric Surgery Center, Rehabilitation Services, The Eye Surgery Center, Maternity Services and Parent Education, as well as Pediatrics. Clara Maass is an eight-time recipient of the A-rated Hospital Safety score from The Leap Frog Group, an independent national nonprofit group measuring hospital safety and quality. For more information about Clara Maass Medical Center, visit barnabashealth.org/claramaass. Rendina is a trusted national leader in healthcare real estate, providing a full-service platform that includes design, development, acquisition, leasing and management. Rendina has developed more than 7.5 million square feet of real estate throughout the country. Rendina has offices in Jupiter, Fla.; Dallas; Tucson, Ariz.; Solana Beach, Calif.; Cincinnati; Charlotte, N.C.; and Livingston, N.J. For information or questions, please contact Stephen Barry, Executive Vice President of Leasing, at 866-630-5055; or visit rendina.com.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "South Korea Market Report for Electroencephalogram Monitoring and Diagnostics 2017 - MedCore" report to their offering. The EEG market is made up of clinical EEG monitors, long-term EEG monitors and ICU monitors. Clinical EEG monitoring equipment represented the single largest segment followed by long-term EEG monitors and ICU EEG segments. Presently, the clinical EEG market accounts for the majority of the diagnostic EEG market revenue. However, over the forecast period the long-term monitoring segment will strengthen further to represent a larger share of the total market, eating away at the market share of clinical EEG monitors. This shift is driven in part by the high costs associated with the feature loaded monitor configurations used in non-routine settings. Future growth within the total EEG market is attributable to a number of factors: Patient outcome benefits resulting from earlier EEG-based detections and interventions are being realized and will drive greater EEG use, particularly in the context of epilepsy monitoring. Expansion of signal interpretation services and technological advancements improving usability will make EEG diagnostics more accessible and increase adoption in both acute and sub-acute care settings. The diagnostic EEG market has been expanding significantly with revenue growth driven largely by the ICU monitor, long-term monitor, and, to a lesser extent, clinical EEG segment since this market is already mature and will not be very active outside of replacement-driven sales. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/pl6rdk/south_korea


BRUSSELS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--iMDsoft announced that the sixth site at Nexuz Health, a consortium looking to raise the quality of patient care by facilitating clear, transparent partnerships between hospitals, has gone live with the MetaVision clinical information system. AZ Sint-Jan Brugge-Oostende now has electronic patient records in over 50 ICU beds, joining UZ Leuven, AZ Groeninge Kortrijk, OLV Ziekenhuis Aalst, AZ Sint-Lucas and AZ Turnhout in using MetaVision. Itémedical and iMDsoft cooperated on the Nexuz Heath project, which now includes over 250 beds live with the system. MetaVision fully supports the unique workflows of the critical care environment. Installed in hundreds of ICUs worldwide, MetaVision has helped improve quality of care, operational efficiency and financial performance at hospitals across the globe. The six Nexuz Health sites partnering with iMDsoft benefit from: “With our joint goals of striving for improvement and introducing innovation, iMDsoft and Nexuz Health are a natural match. We’ve been working closely with UZ Leuven, the founder of Nexuz Health, for over a decade,” said Shahar Sery, Executive Vice President of iMDsoft. “The latest addition to this project, AZ Sint-Jan Brugge-Oostende, now has a new level of support for their ICU workflow, helping clinicians to work more efficiently and deliver better care.” “The system’s high degree of configurability allows us to implement MetaVision in multiple hospitals. We are able to both share aspects of the configuration and allow departments to preserve their own workflow. We have found tremendous value in the way that all kinds of data are integrated visually for follow-up of intensive care treatment as the effects of the treatment are immediately apparent,” said Dominiek Cottem, Project Leader for Patient Data Management Systems at UZ Leuven. iMDsoft is a leading provider of Clinical Information Systems for acute, critical care and perioperative environments. The company's flagship family of solutions, the MetaVision Suite, was first implemented in 1999. Hospitals and health networks worldwide use MetaVision to improve care quality and enhance financial results. The system promotes compliance with protocols and best practices, streamlines reporting and supports clinical research. iMDsoft is a wholly owned subsidiary of N. Harris Computer Corporation, headquartered in Wakefield, MA. To learn more about iMDsoft, visit www.imd-soft.com.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

Can Comfort Care At The ER Help Older People Live Longer And Suffer Less? A man sobbed in a New York emergency room. His elderly wife, who suffered from advanced dementia, had just had a breathing tube stuck down her throat. He knew she never would have wanted that. Now he had to decide whether to reverse the life-sustaining treatment that medics had begun. When Dr. Kei Ouchi faced this family as a young resident at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, he had no idea what to say. The husband, who had cared for his wife for the past 10 years, knew her condition had declined so much that she wouldn't want to be rescued. But when Ouchi offered to take out the tube, the man cried more: "She's breathing. How can we stop that?" Ouchi had pursued emergency medicine to rescue victims of gunshot wounds and car crashes. He was unprepared, he says, for what he encountered: a stream of older patients with serious illnesses like dementia, cancer and heart disease — patients for whom the life-saving techniques he was trained to perform often only prolonged the suffering. As baby boomers age, more of them are visiting the emergency room, which can be an overcrowded, disorienting and even traumatic place. Adults 65 and older made 20.8 million emergency room visits in 2013, up from 16.2 million in 2000, according to the most recent hospital survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The survey found 1 in 6 visits to the ER were made by an older patient, a proportion that's expected to rise. Half of adults in this age group visit the ER in their last month of life, according to a study in the journal Health Affairs. Of those, half die in the hospital, even though most people say they'd prefer to die at home. The influx is prompting more clinicians to rethink what happens in the fast-paced emergency room, where the default is to do everything possible to extend life. Hospitals across the country — including in Ohio, Texas, Virginia and New Jersey — are bringing palliative care, which focuses on improving quality of life for patients with advanced illness, into the emergency department. Interest is growing among doctors: 149 emergency physicians have become certified in palliative care since that option became available just over a decade ago, and others are working closely with palliative care teams. But efforts to transform the ER face significant challenges, including a lack of time, staffing and expertise, not to mention a culture clash. Researchers who interviewed emergency room staff at two Boston hospitals, for instance, found resistance to palliative care. ER doctors questioned how they could handle delicate end-of-life conversations for patients they barely knew. Others argued that the ER, with its "cold, simple rooms" and drunken patients screaming, is not an appropriate place to provide palliative care, which tends to physical, psychological and spiritual needs. Ouchi saw some of these challenges during his residency in New York, when he visited the homes of older patients who frequently visited the emergency room. He saw how obstacles like transportation, frailty and poor vision made it difficult for them to leave the house to see a doctor. "So what do they do?" Ouchi asks. "They call 911." When these patients arrive at the emergency room, doctors treat their acute symptoms, but not their underlying needs, Ouchi says. In more severe cases, when the patient can't talk and doesn't have an advanced directive or a medical decision-maker available, doctors pursue the most aggressive care possible to keep them alive: CPR, intravenous fluids, breathing tubes. "Our default in the ER is pedal to the metal," says Dr. Corita Grudzen, an emergency physician at NYU Langone Medical Center who studies palliative care in the ER. But when doctors learn after the fact that the patient would not have wanted that, the emergency rescue forces families to choose whether to remove life support. When older adults are very ill — if they need an IV drip to maintain blood pressure, a ventilator to breathe, or medication to restart the heart — they are most likely to end up in an intensive care unit, where the risk of developing hospital-acquired infections and delirium is increased, Grudzen says. Meanwhile, it's not clear whether these aggressive interventions really extend their lives, she adds. Some have sought to address these problems by creating separate, quieter emergency rooms for older patients. Others say bringing palliative care consultations into regular emergency rooms could reduce hospitalization, drive down costs and even extend life. There's no hard evidence that this approach will live up to its promise. The only major randomized controlled trial, which Grudzen led at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, found that palliative care consultations in the emergency room improved quality of life for cancer patients. It did not find statistically significant evidence that the consultations improved rates of survival, depression, ICU admission or discharge to hospice. But frontline doctors say they're seeing how palliative care in the ER can avert suffering. For instance, Ouchi recalls one patient — a man, in his late 60s — who showed up at the emergency room for the fifth time in six months with fever and back pain. Previous visits hadn't addressed the underlying problem: The man was dying of cancer. This time, a nurse and social worker called in a palliative care team, who talked to the patient about his goals. "All he wanted was to be comfortable at home," Ouchi says. The man enrolled in hospice, a form of palliative care for terminally ill patients. He died about six months later, at home. Now Ouchi and others are trying to come up with systematic ways to identify which patients could benefit from palliative care. One such screening tool, dubbed P-CaRES, developed at Brown University in Providence, R.I., gives ER doctors a list of questions. Does the patient have life-limiting conditions such as advanced dementia or sepsis? How often does the patient visit the ER? Would the doctor be surprised if the patient died within 12 months? Doctors are using the tool to refer patients at the University of California-San Francisco Medical Center at Parnassus to palliative care doctors, says Dr. Kalie Dove-Maguire, a clinical instructor there. The questions pop up automatically on the electronic medical record for every ER patient who is about to be admitted to the hospital. Dove-Maguire says UCSF hasn't published results, but the tool has helped individual patients, including a middle-aged man with widespread cancer who showed up at the ER with low blood pressure. The man "would have been admitted to the ICU with lines and tubes and invasive procedures," she says, but staff talked to his family, learned his wishes and sent him to home hospice. "Having that conversation in the ER, which is the entry point to the hospital, is vital," Dove-Maguire says. But time is scarce in ERs. Doctors' performance is measured in minutes, Grudzen notes, and the longer they stop to make calls to refer one patient to hospice, the more patients line up waiting for a bed. Finding someone to have conversations about a patient's goals of care can be difficult, too. Ouchi enlisted ER doctors to use the screening tool for 207 older ER patients at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, where he now works as an emergency physician. They found a third of the patients would have benefited from a palliative care consultation. But there aren't nearly enough palliative care doctors to provide that level of care, Ouchi says. "The workforce for specialty palliative care is tiny, and the need is growing," says Grudzen. Palliative care is a relatively new specialty, and there's a national shortfall of as many as 18,000 palliative care doctors, according to one estimate. "We've got to teach cardiologists, intensivists, emergency physicians, how to do palliative care," she said. "We really have to teach ourselves the skills." Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent part of the Kaiser Family Foundation.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Technavio has announced the top five leading vendors in their recent global medical ventilators market report until 2021. This research report also lists seven other prominent vendors that are expected to impact the market during the forecast period. The research study by Technavio on the global medical ventilators market for 2017-2021 provides a detailed industry analysis based on technology (non-invasive and invasive), product (ICU ventilators and portable ventilators), end-user (hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs), and home care), and geography (the Americas, EMEA, and APAC). “The global medical ventilators market is projected to grow to over USD 4200 million by 2021, at a CAGR of more than 6% over the forecast period. Currently, the rise in demand for non-invasive ventilators is one of the key factors driving the growth of the market,” says Neha Noopur, a lead analyst at Technavio for orthopedics and medical devices research. Vendors in the global medical ventilators market are extremely competitive due to the presence of multiple global as well as local players. Local players are confined to a specific region and exploit their home ground advantage to build robust after sales service network. The competition in the market is growing as the local players are expanding through strategic alliances to expand the product portfolio and increase their global presence. Vendors are also launching innovative, compact products that include improved features and are easy to use. This report is available at a USD 1,000 discount for a limited time only: View market snapshot before purchasing Buy 1 Technavio report and get the second for 50% off. Buy 2 Technavio reports and get the third for free. Top five vendors in the global medical ventilators market Medtronic operates across four core business areas: cardiac and vascular, minimally invasive therapies, restorative therapies, and diabetes. It has three strategic priorities that include therapy innovation, globalization, and economic value. The company offers acute care ventilators and portable ventilators. BD has extended its product portfolio providing a complete end-to-end solution from pharmacy to patient. The company focuses on driving its growth through innovation. A subsidiary of Royal Philips Electronics, Philips Healthcare mainly deals in four divisions: Personal Health businesses, Diagnosis & Treatment businesses, and Connected Care & Health Informatics businesses. Hamilton Medical has been developing solutions to support clinicians in providing better care. The company designs and manufactures intelligent microprocessor-controlled ICU ventilators. The company developed the concept of “Ventilation Autopilot,” which can increase patient safety, decrease clinician workload, and leave the clinician in command. Smiths Medical is a leading supplier of specialty medical devices. The company's product portfolio includes infusion therapy, vascular access, vital care, and specialty products and services. They supply hospitals, emergency, home, and specialty care environments with products for intensive care, surgery, post-operative care, and chronic illness management. Become a Technavio Insights member and access all three of these reports for a fraction of their original cost. As a Technavio Insights member, you will have immediate access to new reports as they’re published in addition to all 6,000+ existing reports covering segments like cardiovascular devices, central nervous system, and in-vitro diagnostics. This subscription nets you thousands in savings, while staying connected to Technavio’s constant transforming research library, helping you make informed business decisions more efficiently. Technavio is leading global technology research and advisory company. The company develops over 2000 pieces of research every year, covering more than 500 technologies across 80 countries. Technavio has about 300 analysts globally who specialize in customized consulting and business research assignments across the latest leading edge technologies. Technavio analysts employ primary as well as secondary research techniques to ascertain the size and vendor landscape in a range of markets. Analysts obtain information using a combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches, besides using in-house market modeling tools and proprietary databases. They corroborate this data with the data obtained from various market participants and stakeholders across the value chain, including vendors, service providers, distributors, resellers, and end-users. If you are interested in more information, please contact our media team at media@technavio.com.


The study's results suggest that combinatorial alarm signals based on multi-parameter assessment reduced overall load better than individual-parameter sustained alarm signals and appeared to be more effective at identifying at-risk patients. Using only sustained alarms as the filter for notifications reduced alerts from 22,812 to 13,000. However, passing multiple series of data through a multi-variable rules engine that monitored the values of pulse (HR), oxygen saturation (SpO ), respiratory rate (RR), and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO ) in order to determine which alarms to send to the nurse-call phone system further reduced alerts to just 209—a 99% reduction. "More importantly, clinical staff was alerted for every patient that experienced an actual respiratory depression episode," said the study's co-author, John Zaleski, PhD, CAP, CPHIMS, Chief Analytics Officer of Bernoulli. "The successful implementation of real-time patient safety initiatives have long been a goal of health system CIOs, but recognizing and responding to signs of patient deterioration requires medical devices connectivity as well as clinician's access to real-time data." A Growing Patient Safety Threat The use of opioids, such as hydromorphone and morphine sulfate, are known to increase risk of respiratory depression in patients who have been diagnosed with or are at risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). More than half of medication-related deaths and 20,000 incidences of respiratory depression-related interventions annually are attributed to the delivery of opioids in a care setting, at a cost of approximately $2 billion per year to the U.S. healthcare system. "Data from multiple sources may be required to achieve improvements in patient safety, including the EHR and real-time data from medical devices," said Zaleski. "Moment-to-moment changes in patient vitals are not usually available in the long-term clinical record, so a hybrid approach involving both real-time and aperiodic and discrete data is required to improve the overall surveillance of these patients." Respiratory Depression Safety Surveillance The solution leveraged in the study, Bernoulli's Respiratory Depression Safety Surveillance (RDSS), includes patented analytics with multi-variable thresholds—adjustable by the care facility—to identify clinically actionable events while significantly reducing the overall number of alarms communicated to remote and mobile clinicians, mitigating the risk of alarm fatigue. RDSS is flexible, adaptable and scalable from individual departments to enterprise-wide deployments. Its vendor-neutral architecture leverages the hospital's existing investments in IT, network, wireless and mobile infrastructure, while its FDA class II clearance includes indications for use to provide remote monitoring and alarm surveillance. Implications for Real-Time Healthcare "Combining analysis with real-time data at the point of collection creates a powerful tool for prediction and clinical decision support," said Zaleski. "The ability to track patients throughout the hospital, continuously add new devices, and distribute real-time patient monitoring to centralized dashboards and mobile devices should be a major consideration for CIOs tasked with achieving real-time healthcare capabilities." Beyond high-acuity areas, healthcare systems are creating a foundation for other real-time healthcare innovations, including clinical surveillance modules, medical device integration in an EHR and virtual ICUs. "This study demonstrates the promise of using real-time data for myriad patient safety initiatives," said Janet Dillione, CEO of Bernoulli. "In addition, Bernoulli's RDSS solution sets the stage for a wide range of applications, including medical device integration, precision alarm notifications, and clinical surveillance modules in various care settings." About Bernoulli Bernoulli is the leader in real-time solutions for patient safety, with more than 1,200 installed, operational systems. Bernoulli One™ is the market's only real-time, connected healthcare platform that combines comprehensive and vendor-neutral medical device integration with powerful middleware, clinical surveillance, telemedicine/virtual ICU, advanced alarm management, predictive analytics and robust distribution capabilities into ONE solution that empowers clinicians with tools to drive better patient safety, clinical outcomes, patient experience, and provider workflow.  For more information about Bernoulli One™, visit www.bernoullihealth.com. Follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn. Visit our Resource Center to download case studies, white papers and articles. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/study-real-time-analytics-continuous-monitoring-mitigates-threat-of-respiratory-depression-300463311.html


"As we continue to expand our product offerings and support more health teams around the globe, we've also been diligently working to advance and unify our core software," said Avner Halperin, CEO of EarlySense. "Continuous monitoring of patients in non-acute hospital areas supports the new ECRI safety guidelines by assisting clinical staff in early detection of patient deterioration and potentially adverse events. The update also provides greater flexibility for managing multiple EarlySense systems between divisions or floors, depending on the patient's acuity level." Earlier this year, the ECRI Institute published its top 10 patient safety concerns for 2017, including unrecognized patient deterioration and opioid administration and monitoring in acute care. EarlySense addresses these concerns through continuously monitoring heart rate, respiratory rate and motion, to aid with early detection and empower clinicians to intervene more effectively. EarlySense technology has proven to assist clinicians in preventing adverse events, reducing of hospital length of stay and saving lives. The new release provides health teams with expanded remote access to real-time patient data via tablets, computers, laptops and other mobile devices, enabling greater flexibility when monitoring patients and changes in vital signs. "In this version, we responded to multiple customer requests for enhanced, tablet-based remote view and control of our system and delivered a secure solution that enables clinical teams and leaders to effectively manage our system on the go - wherever they are," added Guy Meger, CTO and VP R&D at EarlySense. Health facilities with diverse monitoring needs will now be able to manage several EarlySense systems on one central platform. EarlySense systems supported by the new platform include the All-In-One, Safety and Vitals Solutions, with bedside monitors, in addition to InSight, featuring a discrete interface originally designed for post-acute care settings, including skilled nursing and rehabilitation facilities. EarlySense provides contact-free, continuous monitoring solutions for the medical and consumer digital health markets. EarlySense's patented sensor and advanced algorithms monitor and analyze cardiac, respiratory and motion parameters. Used in hospitals and healthcare facilities worldwide, EarlySense assists clinicians in early detection of patient deterioration, helping to prevent adverse events, including code blues, preventable ICU transfers, patient falls and pressure ulcers. LIVE by EarlySense is the first home health and sleep monitor powered by medically-proven, contact-free, continuous monitoring technology. The company's OEM technology is also at the core of wellness and sleep products marketed by international partners including Samsung, Beurer and iFit. EarlySense was founded in 2004 and has offices in Waltham, MA, and Ramat Gan, Israel. For more information, please visit http://www.earlysense.com and http://www.livebyearlysense.com. Follow LIVE by EarlySense on Facebook and Twitter.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Australia Market Report for Electroencephalogram Monitoring and Diagnostics 2017 - MedCore" report to their offering. The EEG market is made up of clinical EEG monitors, long-term EEG monitors, and ICU monitors. Clinical EEG monitoring equipment represented the single largest segment followed by long-term EEG monitors and ICU EEG segments. Presently, the clinical EEG market accounts for the majority of the diagnostic EEG market revenue. However, over the forecast period the long-term monitoring segment will strengthen further to represent a larger share of the total market, eating away at the market share of clinical EEG monitors. This shift is driven in part by the high costs associated with the feature loaded monitor configurations utilized in non-routine settings. Furthermore, the deployment of new, high-end technologies, including source imaging and dense array EEG, in addition to expanded applications for EEG will facilitate further revenue growth across these developing EEG device markets. Future growth within the total EEG market is attributable to a number of factors: Patient outcome benefits resulting from earlier EEG-based detections and interventions are being realized and will drive greater EEG use, particularly in the context of epilepsy monitoring. Expansion of signal interpretation services and technological advancements improving usability will make EEG diagnostics more accessible and increase adoption in both acute and sub-acute care settings. Finally, the aging population and increase in the prevalence of neurological and mental disorders will prompt an expansion of EEG procedural volumes. The diagnostic EEG market has been expanding significantly with revenue growth driven largely by the ICU monitor, long-term monitor, and, to a lesser extent, clinical EEG segment since this market is already mature and will not be very active outside of replacement-driven sales. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/bl6vlk/australia_market


The global medical bed market is projected to USD 3.41 Billion by 2022 from USD 2.59 Billion in 2017, growing at a CAGR of 5.6% during the forecast period (2017-2022). Factors such as increasing investments in healthcare infrastructural development, technological innovations in ICU beds, increasing number of beds in private hospitals, and increasing volume of chronic care patients are expected to drive the growth of the medical beds market in the coming years. On the other hand, the declining number of beds in public hospitals may limit market growth to a certain extent. The medical bed market is segmented on the basis of type, application, end user, usage, and region. Based on usage, the market is segmented into major four categories acute care, psychiatric care and bariatric care, long-term care, and other beds (maternity and rehabilitative beds). The long-term care segment is expected to have the fastest-growing market during the forecast period owing to the increasing number of patients requiring long-term care. Based on application, the market is segmented into two categories intensive care and non-intensive care. In 2017, the intensive care segment is expected to account for the largest share of the market owing to increasing number of geriatric patients requiring critical care. On the basis of type, the medical bed market is segmented into manual beds, semi-electric beds, and electric beds. The electric beds segment is expected to dominate the medical beds market in 2017. Increasing number of patients requiring bariatric care as well as growing geriatric population are the factors driving the growth of this segment. On the basis of end user, the market is segmented into home care settings, hospitals, elderly care facilities. The hospitals segment is expected to account for the largest share of the market in 2017. However, the home care settings segment is expected to have the fastest growth rate in the forecast period. This can be attributed to increasing government support to decrease the length of stay of patients inside hospitals. 1 Introduction 2 Research Methodology 3 Executive Summary 4 Premium Insights 5 Market Overview 6 Medical Bed Market, By Usage 7 Medical Bed Market, By Application 8 Medical Bed Market, By Type 9 Medical Bed Market, By End User 10 Medical Bed Market, By Region 11 Competitive Landscape 12 Company Profiles 13 Appendix For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/dzb47l/medical_bed To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/medical-bed-market-by-usage-application-type-end-user---global-forecast-to-2022---research-and-markets-300464434.html

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