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Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain

Clavo B.,Dr Negrin University Hospital | Clavo B.,Canary Islands Institute for Cancer Research ICIC | Ceballos D.,Dr Negrin University Hospital | Gutierrez D.,Dr Negrin University Hospital | And 15 more authors.
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management | Year: 2013

Context: Persistent or severe hemorrhagic radiation proctitis (HRP) has limited therapeutic options. Objectives: To describe our experience with ozone therapy (O3T) in the management of refractory HRP. Methods: Patients (n = 17; median age 69 years [range 42-80 years]) previously irradiated for prostate or uterine cancer and suffering persistent or severe HRP without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive an O 3/O2 gas mixture via rectal insufflations and topical application of ozonized oil. Most of the patients (83%) had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up post-O3T was 40 months (range 3-56 months). Results: Endoscopic treatments required were: 43 (median 1; range 0-10) pre-O3T; 17 (median 0; range 0-8; P = 0.063) during O3T; and five (median 0; range 0-2; P = 0.008) during follow-up. Hemoglobin levels were 10.35 g/dL (7-14 g/dL) pre-O3T and 13 g/dL (9-15 g/dL) (P = 0.001) post-O3T. Median toxicity grades were 3 (range 2-4) pre-O 3T, 1 (range 0-2; P < 0.001) at the end of O3T, and 0 (range 0-1; P < 0.001) at the last follow-up. Conclusion: Persistent advanced HRP was significantly improved with O3T. The addition of O 3T can be useful as a complementary treatment in the long-term management of HRP and, as such, merits further evaluation. © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee.Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Source


Clavo B.,Dr Negrin University Hospital | Clavo B.,Canary Islands Institute for Cancer Research ICIC | Clavo B.,Spanish Group for Clinical Research in Radiation Oncology GICOR | Santana-Rodriguez N.,Dr Negrin University Hospital | And 14 more authors.
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Year: 2015

Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n=12) previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83%) patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52-119). Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p<0.001) and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p=0.032). Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7-14) g/dL to 13 (10-15) g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p=0.008). Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation. © 2015 Bernardino Clavo et al. Source


Clavo B.,Dr Negrin University Hospital | Clavo B.,Canary Islands Institute for Cancer Research ICIC | Suarez G.,Dr Negrin University Hospital | Suarez G.,Canary Islands Institute for Cancer Research ICIC | And 6 more authors.
Forschende Komplementarmedizin | Year: 2011

Background: Radiation-induced brain injury (RBI) and low-perfusion brain syndromes are mediated by ischemia and hypometabolism and have limited treatment options. Ozone therapy as treatment in vascular diseases has been described, but the effects on brain tissue have not been well documented. Case Report: We describe a 75-year-old patient with vascular risk factors and meningioma who was treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. 14 months later the patient presented with progressive clinical impairment despite the use of acetylsalicylic acid and corticosteroids. Clinical and imaging evaluations before/after ozone therapy were done by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET); performance status assessment was done using Barthel Index and World Health Organization/Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Scale (WHO/ECOG Scale). Ozone therapy was performed by autohemotransfusion. Results: Basal images showed brain areas with ischemia and hypometabolism compatible with ischemic processes and/or RBI. There were no changes in MRI or CT scan images following ozone therapy. However, improvements in brain perfusion and metabolism were demonstrable with SPECT and PET; they correlated with clinical development and performance status scales. Conclusion: This report supports our previous works about the effect of ozone therapy in cerebral blood flow, and it suggests the use of ozone therapy in ischemic and hypometabolic brain syndromes such as stroke or RBI. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel. Source

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