Fairfax, VA, United States
Fairfax, VA, United States

ICF International, formerly known as ICF Consulting, is a management, technology, and policy consulting firm based in Fairfax, Virginia. ICF partners with government, commercial, and not-for-profit clients to deliver professional services and technology. ICF works across the following markets: energy, environment, and infrastructure; health, social programs, and consumer/financial; and public safety and defense.ICF employs more than 4,500 employees in more than 70 offices worldwide. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Vast amounts of energy are wasted every year in the form of heat. A new project led by the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (Berkeley Lab) seeks to efficiently capture that heat and convert it to electricity, potentially saving California up to $385 million per year. With a $2-million grant from the California Energy Commission (CEC), Berkeley Lab is partnering with Alphabet Energy to create a cost-effective thermoelectric waste heat recovery system to reduce both energy use in the industrial sector and electricity-related carbon emissions. ICF International estimates that such a system could save California 3.2 million megawatt-hours per year in energy while also increasing electrical reliability. The funding comes from CEC’s Electric Program Investment Charge (EPIC) program, which funds clean energy innovation to reduce pollution, foster economic development, and meet the state’s climate goals. “The potential to create electricity from waste heat in California has not been tapped significantly due to the lack of suitable waste-heat-to-electricity conversion technology,” says Ravi Prasher, director of Berkeley Lab’s Energy Storage and Distributed Resources Division. “Thermoelectrics is one of the most promising technologies for waste heat conversion out there, but the biggest challenge has been to find a reliable and cost effective material that can work at high temperatures.” Industrial facilities, such as power plants, cement plants, mining and manufacturing facilities, and oil and gas operations have more than 763 megawatts (MW) of electricity-generating potential from waste heat in California, and national potential is approximately 15,000 MW. However, most current thermoelectric materials are limited by several factors, including high cost, low efficiency, and the inability to operate reliably at temperatures above 400 degrees Celsius. The new Berkeley Lab project, co-led by Prasher and Vi Rapp, a mechanical research scientist in the Energy Technologies Area, is working to overcome these barriers. In collaboration with Alphabet Energy, they will develop a cost-effective process for creating an advanced thermoelectric material constructed from silicon nanowire arrays. Thermoelectrics harvest exhaust heat from engines, furnaces, and other sources of waste heat and convert it to useful energy without generating additional greenhouse gas emissions. Commercially available thermoelectrics achieve less than 5 percent efficiency in converting heat to electricity. The technology has already seen some market traction in the oil and gas and automotive industries. Alphabet Energy is a Hayward, California-based startup that launched in 2009 using nanotechnology licensed from Berkeley Lab. They are developing advanced thermoelectric materials based on silicon nanowires with conversion efficiencies of 10 percent or greater and the ability to operate at temperatures up to 800 degrees Celsius. “With the increase in efficiency, other market opportunities in waste-heat-to-power could be accelerated,” Rapp says. “For example, an advanced thermoelectric system could improve remote power generation technology, bringing electricity to places without grid access or reliable solar energy.” The higher operating temperature also opens up new possibilities, such as increasing the power produced from capturing high-temperature waste heat from gas flares. The CEC funding will enable Berkeley Lab and Alphabet Energy to develop a prototype device and validate its performance for high temperature heat-to-electricity conversion. “Our objective is to develop a new system that has very few parasitic losses, is more compact, is modularized for a broad scale of distributed applications, and will reliably produce additional electricity with almost no maintenance cost or operator involvement for many years,” Prasher says. “We believe it will make waste-heat-to-power viable and affordable in a wider spectrum of applications.”


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Midwest EVOLVE electric vehicle project hosts first EV ride and drive at Earth Day event in Ohio | Main | Solvay, Bentley, Penso partner on lightweight architecture » With a $2-million grant from the California Energy Commission (CEC), Berkeley Lab is partnering with Alphabet Energy to create a cost-effective thermoelectric waste heat recovery system to reduce both energy use in the industrial sector and electricity-related carbon emissions. ICF International estimates that such a system could save California 3.2 million megawatt-hours per year in energy while also increasing electrical reliability. The funding comes from CEC’s Electric Program Investment Charge (EPIC) program, which funds clean energy innovation to reduce pollution, foster economic development, and meet the state’s climate goals. Industrial facilities, such as power plants, cement plants, mining and manufacturing facilities, and oil and gas operations have more than 763 megawatts (MW) of electricity-generating potential from waste heat in California, and national potential is approximately 15,000 MW. However, most current thermoelectric materials are limited by several factors, including high cost, low efficiency, and the inability to operate reliably at temperatures above 400 degrees Celsius. The new Berkeley Lab project, co-led by Prasher and Vi Rapp, a mechanical research scientist in the Energy Technologies Area, is working to overcome these barriers. In collaboration with Alphabet Energy, they will develop a cost-effective process for creating an advanced thermoelectric material constructed from silicon nanowire arrays. Commercially available thermoelectrics achieve less than 5 percent efficiency in converting heat to electricity. The technology has already seen some market traction in the oil and gas and automotive industries. Alphabet Energy is a Hayward, California-based startup that launched in 2009 using nanotechnology licensed from Berkeley Lab. They are developing advanced thermoelectric materials based on silicon nanowires with conversion efficiencies of 10% or greater and the ability to operate at temperatures up to 800 degrees Celsius. The higher operating temperature also opens up new possibilities, such as increasing the power produced from capturing high-temperature waste heat from gas flares. The CEC funding will enable Berkeley Lab and Alphabet Energy to develop a prototype device and validate its performance for high temperature heat-to-electricity conversion.


Prosser A.T.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Tang T.,ICF International | Irene Hall H.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association | Year: 2012

Context: Persons born outside the United States comprise about 13% of the US population, and the challenges these persons face in accessing health care may lead to poorer human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease outcomes. Objective: To describe the epidemiology of HIV among persons born outside the United States and among US-born persons diagnosed in the United States. Design, Setting, and Participants: Analysis of the estimated number of US-born persons and persons born outside the United States diagnosed with HIV from 2007 through 2010 in 46 states and 5 US territories, the demographic characteristics, and the HIV transmission risk factors reported to the National HIV Surveillance System. Foreign-born persons were defined as persons born outside the United States and its territories, inclusive of naturalized citizens. Main Outcome Measure: Diagnosis of HIV infection. Results: From 2007 through 2010, HIV was diagnosed in 191 697 persons in the US population; of these, 16.2% (95% CI, 16.0%-16.3%) (n=30 995) were born outside the United States. Of the 25 255 persons with a specified country or region of birth outside the United States, 14.5% (n=3656) were from Africa, 41.0% (n=10 343) were from Central America (including Mexico), and 21.5% (n=5418) were from the Caribbean. The 4 states (California, Florida, New York, and Texas) reporting the highest numbers of persons born outside the United States and diagnosed with HIV were also the top 4 reporters of HIV cases overall. Among persons born outside the United States with HIV, 73.5% (n=22 773) were male. Among whites, 1841 of 55 574 (3.3%) of HIV diagnoses were in persons born outside the United States; in blacks, 8614 of 86 547 diagnoses (10.0%); in Hispanics, 17 913 of 42 431 diagnoses (42.2%); and in Asians, 1987 of 3088 diagnoses (64.3%). The percentage infected through heterosexual contact was 39.4% among persons born outside the United States vs 27.2% for US-born persons. Conclusions: Among persons in 46 US states and 5 US territories who received a diagnosis of HIV from 2007 through 2010, 16.2% were born outside the United States. Compared with US-born persons diagnosed with HIV, persons born outside the United States had different epidemiologic characteristics. ©2012 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


News Article | December 22, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

NEW YORK, NY--(Marketwired - December 22, 2016) - Aviation Week's MRO Latin America (#MROLA) will be held January 25-26, 2017 at the Now Jade Riviera Cancun in Cancun, Mexico. Focused on commercial aviation maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO), the event offers a forum for exchanging information and best practices, and networking among industry leaders representing airlines, regulators, suppliers, and service providers. Latin America is expected to be the third largest market for deliveries, just after North America and Western Europe (ranked one and two, respectively), despite current tough economic conditions, according to Brian Kough, Director of Forecasts & Analysis with Aviation Week Network. The experts will lead drill-down discussions, sessions, workshops, and business development opportunities in an intimate setting with attendees focused on growing their organizations in South America, Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean. More than 80% of the attendees are involved in the acquisition cycle as buyers, recommenders and influencers. Within 10 years, Latin America will comprise more than six percent of the world MRO demand for commercial aircraft. The MRO Latin America Showcase will enable attendees to shop 40 solution providers showcasing tools, technology and service. More than 400 attendees, representing companies from Latin America, North America, Europe, and Asia, will foster new relationships, strengthen existing ones, and expand reach across the MRO community. Speakers will include: Chairman's Welcome, Corneel Koster, COO, Grupo Aeromexico; Keynote Speaker, Juan Zuazua, CEO, VivaAerobus; Closing Remarks, Jorge Jacome, Aeromexico; Luis Alberto Mucino Landeros, Interjet; Sonny Stern, Delta TechOps; Caroline Vandedrinck, SR Technics; Carlos Naufel, Embraer Commercial Aviation; Ahmad Zamany, Copa Airlines; Chris Markou IATA; Andre Gaspar, GOL Linhas Aereas; Luis Carlos C.P. Filho, GOL; John Maggiore, Boeing; Oscar Quesada, ICAO; Jonathan Berger, ICF International; Ernesto Ruiz, former chairman of the board for Aeroman; Ramon Berenguer, Kellstrom Materials; Eduardo Pina, Azul Linhaus Aereas Brasilerias; Francisco Morgada, VivaAerobus; Yohan Closs, Airbus Flight Hour Services; and Asier Elorduy; AJW Group. MRO Latin America is sponsored by APS, Embraer, MexicanaMRO, NAS, Satair Group and StandardAero. It is supported locally by ProMexico. For the full itinerary, click here. "Latin America is a rapidly-growing MRO hub and this show gives attendees and exhibitors the opportunity to make contacts and meet decision makers in an intimate setting," said Lydia Janow, Managing Director/Events & Tradeshows, Aviation Week Network. "The exhibitor space sold out quickly due to demand for the show." MRO Latin America kicks off on Tuesday, January 24 with a welcome cocktail reception. Registration hours are Wednesday, January 25 from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and on Thursday, January 26 from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. with networking breakfasts, luncheons, a cocktail party and dinner scheduled. ABOUT AVIATION WEEK NETWORK Aviation Week Network is the largest multimedia information and services provider for the global aviation, aerospace and defense industries that has a database of 1.2 million professionals around the world. Industry professionals rely on Aviation Week Network for analysis, marketing and intelligence. Customers include the world's leading manufacturers, suppliers, airlines, business aviation operators, militaries, governments and other organizations that serve this global market. The product portfolio includes Air Transport World, Aviation Week & Space Technology, AC-U-KWIK, Aircraft Blue Book, Airportdata.com, Air Charter Guide, AviationWeek.com, Aviation Week Intelligence Network, Business & Commercial Aviation, ShowNews, SpeedNews, Fleet and MRO forecasts, global maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) tradeshows and aerospace & defense conferences. ABOUT INFORMA Aviation Week Network is part of Informa, the international business intelligence, academic publishing, knowledge and events group. Informa serves commercial, professional and academic communities, helping them connect and learn, and creating and providing access to content and intelligence that helps people and businesses work smarter and make better decisions faster. Informa has over 7,500 colleagues in more than 20 countries and a presence in all major geographies. It is listed on the London Stock Exchange and is a member of the FTSE 100.


Hall A.K.,University of Washington | Cole-Lewis H.,Columbia University | Cole-Lewis H.,ICF International | Bernhardt J.M.,University of Texas at Austin
Annual Review of Public Health | Year: 2015

The aim of this systematic review of reviews is to identify mobile text-messaging interventions designed for health improvement and behavior change and to derive recommendations for practice. We have compiled and reviewed existing systematic research reviews and meta-analyses to organize and summarize the text-messaging intervention evidence base, identify best-practice recommendations based on findings from multiple reviews, and explore implications for future research. Our review found that the majority of published text-messaging interventions were effective when addressing diabetes self-management, weight loss, physical activity, smoking cessation, and medication adherence for antiretroviral therapy. However, we found limited evidence across the population of studies and reviews to inform recommended intervention characteristics. Although strong evidence supports the value of integrating text-messaging interventions into public health practice, additional research is needed to establish longer-term intervention effects, identify recommended intervention characteristics, and explore issues of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Hancioglu A.,Statistics and Monitoring Section | Arnold F.,ICF International
PLoS Medicine | Year: 2013

Household surveys are the primary data source of coverage indicators for children and women for most developing countries. Most of this information is generated by two global household survey programmes-the USAID-supported Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and the UNICEF-supported Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS). In this review, we provide an overview of these two programmes, which cover a wide range of child and maternal health topics and provide estimates of many Millennium Development Goal indicators, as well as estimates of the indicators for the Countdown to 2015 initiative and the Commission on Information and Accountability for Women's and Children's Health. MICS and DHS collaborate closely and work through interagency processes to ensure that survey tools are harmonized and comparable as far as possible, but we highlight differences between DHS and MICS in the population covered and the reference periods used to measure coverage. These differences need to be considered when comparing estimates of reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health indicators across countries and over time and we discuss the implications of these differences for coverage measurement. Finally, we discuss the need for survey planners and consumers of survey results to understand the strengths, limitations, and constraints of coverage measurements generated through household surveys, and address some technical issues surrounding sampling and quality control. We conclude that, although much effort has been made to improve coverage measurement in household surveys, continuing efforts are needed, including further research to improve and refine survey methods and analytical techniques. © 2013 Hancioglu, Arnold.


Patent
ICF International | Date: 2014-03-14

Disclosed is a patch antenna that is formed on the surface of an airplane. The patch antenna has a thickness that is sufficiently small, so that the aerodynamic shape of the airplane is not significantly affected. An insulating layer is disposed on the body of the airplane and antenna elements are then placed on the insulating layer. Various frequencies can be either received or transmitted by using antenna elements of various sizes. The body of the airplane is used as a ground plane for the antenna array. When multiple antenna arrays are utilized, antenna elements at the same frequency can generate a lobe that can be directed in different directions using phase changes. Various techniques can be used for applying the insulating layers to the airplane and forming the antenna elements on the insulating layers.


Patent
ICF International | Date: 2012-10-23

A system that collects data from monitored network traffic. The system inputs, in parallel, the data through inputs of a neural network. The system compares an output of the neural network, generated in response to the inputted data, to at least one predetermined output. If the output of the neural network corresponds to the at least one predetermined output, the system provides a notification relating to the data.


A method and apparatus can be configured to receive, by a first network intrusion detection system, packet data that is transmitted in network traffic. The method can also include processing the received packet data, using feature hashing, into a hashed representation. The hashed representation approximates the expressiveness of a high-dimensional representation of the received packet data. The hashed representation can be stored using less memory compared to the high-dimensional representation. The method can also include classifying the hashed representation as either corresponding to a threat signature or as not corresponding to a threat signature.


Patent
ICF International | Date: 2013-07-02

A method and apparatus can be configured to perform the steps of displaying, on a display, a first visual representation of volume in three-dimensional space. The method can also display, on the display, a visual representation of a network security alert. The network security alert can correspond to a notification of a network attack, a network intrusion, or an unwanted activity. The representation of the network security alert can be positioned within the first visual representation of volume. The position of the representation of the network security alert within the first visual representation of volume reflects at least one characteristic of the network security alert.

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