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Gupta A.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Shaw M.,National Museums of Scotland | Cardinal S.,Canadian National Collection of Insects | Fernandez-Triana J.,Canadian National Collection of Insects
ZooKeys | Year: 2016

The unusual species of Cotesia (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae) with the first tergite narrowing at midlength are reviewed. One new species, Cotesia trabalae sp. n.is described from India and compared with Cotesia pistrinariae(Wilkinson) from Africa, the only other species sharing the same character of all the described species worldwide. The generic placement of these two species, based on molecular and morphological analyses as well as parasitoid biology is discussed. © Ankita Gupta et al. Source


Venkatesan T.,West Virginia State University | Sridhar V.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Tomason Y.R.,Indian Institute of Horticultural Research | Jalali S.K.,West Virginia State University | And 6 more authors.
Canadian Entomologist | Year: 2015

Cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a serious pest of several crops throughout the world, representing millions of United States of America dollars worth of damage. This pest can adapt to various cropping systems in a wide geographical range and has high migratory potential. It features high fecundity and can develop resistance to almost all insecticides used for its management. Several investigations to develop microsatellite markers for H. armigera have not been successful because of the paucity of microsatellites in the lepidopteran genome. As well, collections of H. armigera from cotton fields of southern and western India were not yet studied for molecular genetic diversity. The current study aimed to screen publicly available expressed sequence tag resources for simple sequence repeats and assess their potential as DNA markers for assessment of gene flow between collections of southern and western India. We identified 30 polymorphic microsatellites for potential use in diversity analysis of H. armigera collections. Genetic diversity analysis revealed that the collections were widely diverse with population differentiation index (F st) of 0.17. Furthermore, gene flow analysis revealed a mean frequency of private alleles of 11% within the collections. The microsatellite resources we developed could be widely used for molecular diversity or population genetic research involving this important pest of cotton and food crops. © 2015 Entomological Society of Canada 2015. Source


Hosamani M.,Indian Veterinary Research Institute | Basagoudanavar S.H.,Indian Veterinary Research Institute | Sreenivasa B.P.,Indian Veterinary Research Institute | Inumaru S.,Japanese National Institute of Animal Health | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Biotechnology | Year: 2015

The baculovirus expression system (BVES) based on Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is widely used for the expression of eukaryotic proteins. Several insect cells/larvae that are permissive to AcMNPV have been routinely used as hosts to express heterologous proteins. Domesticated Eri silkworm (Samia ricini), reared in many parts of India, Japan and China, is a non-mulberry silkworm. The present study shows that the Eri silkworm larvae are susceptible to intra-haemocoelical inoculation of AcMNPV. The virus replicates in the larva, as indicated by an increased viral loads in the haemolymph upon injection of a recombinant AcMNPV carrying green fluorescent protein gene. The virus showed localized replication in different tissues including the fat body, haemocytes, tracheal matrix and in the Malphigian tubules. The larval system was successfully used to express heterologous protein, by infecting with a recombinant AcMNPV carrying the 3ABC coding sequence of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). The study shows that the Eri silkworm larva can be a potential alternative bioreactor, for scaling up of the recombinant proteins employing the baculovirus system. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Source


Venkatesan T.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Sridhar V.,Indian Institute of Horticultural Research | Tomason Y.R.,West Virginia State University | Jalali S.K.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | And 6 more authors.
Canadian Entomologist | Year: 2015

Cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a serious pest of several crops throughout the world, representing millions of United States of America dollars worth of damage. This pest can adapt to various cropping systems in a wide geographical range and has high migratory potential. It features high fecundity and can develop resistance to almost all insecticides used for its management. Several investigations to develop microsatellite markers for H. armigera have not been successful because of the paucity of microsatellites in the lepidopteran genome. As well, collections of H. armigera from cotton fields of southern and western India were not yet studied for molecular genetic diversity. The current study aimed to screen publicly available expressed sequence tag resources for simple sequence repeats and assess their potential as DNA markers for assessment of gene flow between collections of southern and western India. We identified 30 polymorphic microsatellites for potential use in diversity analysis of H. armigera collections. Genetic diversity analysis revealed that the collections were widely diverse with population differentiation index (F st) of 0.17. Furthermore, gene flow analysis revealed a mean frequency of private alleles of 11% within the collections. The microsatellite resources we developed could be widely used for molecular diversity or population genetic research involving this important pest of cotton and food crops. © Entomological Society of Canada 2015 Source


Kamalanathan V.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Keloth R.,Western Ghats Regional Center | Mohanraj P.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Peter A.,Western Ghats Regional Center
Oriental Insects | Year: 2016

Gryon ingens (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) discovered recently in India and possessing an unusually elongate metasoma is described as a new species. With the exception of the length of the metasoma, the species characters match those of Gryon. The large and elongate eggs of the reduviid host of G. ingens sp. n. account for its unusually long habitus. The high degree of sexual dimorphism, which includes colour, encountered in this instance is atypical of this genus. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Source

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