ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research IIWBR

Karnāl, India

ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research IIWBR

Karnāl, India
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Rai S.,ICAR National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Microorganisms NBAIM | Kashyap P.L.,ICAR National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Microorganisms NBAIM | Kumar S.,ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research IIWBR | Srivastava A.K.,ICAR National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Microorganisms NBAIM | Ramteke P.W.,Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences
World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2016

Microsatellites provide an ideal molecular markers system to screen, characterize and evaluate genetic diversity of several fungal species. Currently, there is very limited information on the genetic diversity of antagonistic Trichoderma species as determined using a range of molecular markers. In this study, expressed and whole genome sequences available in public database were used to investigate the occurrence, relative abundance and relative density of SSRs in five different antagonistic Trichoderma species: Trichoderma atroviride, T. harzianum, T. reesei, T. virens and T. asperellum. Fifteen SSRs loci were used to evaluate genetic diversity of twenty isolates of Trichoderma spp. from different geographical regions of India. Results indicated that relative abundance and relative density of SSRs were higher in T. asperellum followed by T. reesei and T. atroviride. Tri-nucleotide repeats (80.2 %) were invariably the most abundant in all species. The abundance and relative density of SSRs were not influenced by the genome sizes and GC content. Out of eighteen primer sets, only 15 primer pairs showed successful amplification in all the test species. A total of 24 alleles were detected and five loci were highly informative with polymorphism information content values greater than 0.40, these markers provide useful information on genetic diversity and population genetic structure, which, in turn, can exploit for establishing conservation strategy for antagonistic Trichoderma isolates. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


PubMed | Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences, ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research IIWBR and ICAR National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Microorganisms NBAIM
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: World journal of microbiology & biotechnology | Year: 2015

Microsatellites provide an ideal molecular markers system to screen, characterize and evaluate genetic diversity of several fungal species. Currently, there is very limited information on the genetic diversity of antagonistic Trichoderma species as determined using a range of molecular markers. In this study, expressed and whole genome sequences available in public database were used to investigate the occurrence, relative abundance and relative density of SSRs in five different antagonistic Trichoderma species: Trichoderma atroviride, T. harzianum, T. reesei, T. virens and T. asperellum. Fifteen SSRs loci were used to evaluate genetic diversity of twenty isolates of Trichoderma spp. from different geographical regions of India. Results indicated that relative abundance and relative density of SSRs were higher in T. asperellum followed by T. reesei and T. atroviride. Tri-nucleotide repeats (80.2%) were invariably the most abundant in all species. The abundance and relative density of SSRs were not influenced by the genome sizes and GC content. Out of eighteen primer sets, only 15 primer pairs showed successful amplification in all the test species. A total of 24 alleles were detected and five loci were highly informative with polymorphism information content values greater than 0.40, these markers provide useful information on genetic diversity and population genetic structure, which, in turn, can exploit for establishing conservation strategy for antagonistic Trichoderma isolates.


Kashyap P.L.,ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research IIWBR | Kumar S.,ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research IIWBR | Srivastava A.K.,ICAR National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Microorganisms
Environmental Chemistry Letters | Year: 2016

Rapid detection technologies with high sensitivity and selectivity for plant pathogens are essential to prevent disease spread and minimize losses to assure optimal productivity and food security. Traditional laboratory techniques such as microscopy and culture are time-consuming, labour intensive and require complex sample handling. Immunological and molecular techniques have advanced but have some issues related to rapidity, signal strength and instrumentation. The integration of immunological and molecular diagnostics with nanotechnology systems offers an option where all detection steps can be accommodated on a portable miniaturized device for rapid and accurate detection of plant pathogens. The sensitive nature of functionalized nanoparticles can be used to design phytopathogen detection devices with smart sensing capabilities for field use. This review summarizes the current status and future prospects of nanotechnology for detection and diagnosis of plant pathogens. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland


Kashyap P.L.,ICAR National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Microorganisms NBAIM | Kashyap P.L.,ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research IIWBR | Rai S.,ICAR National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Microorganisms NBAIM | Kumar S.,ICAR Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research IIWBR | Srivastava A.K.,ICAR National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Microorganisms NBAIM
Archives of Phytopathology and Plant Protection | Year: 2016

The present study describes the comparative analysis of five genetic markers viz., random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC), BOX-elements, mating type (MAT) locus and microsatellites for genetic analysis of virulent isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri (FOC) representing seven races from chickpea. Phylogenetic analysis of translation elongation factor 1-α and internal transcribed spacer region separated all the FOC isolates into two major clades. Majority of the isolates (FOC 63, FOC 33, FOC 40, FOC 100, FOC 6, FOC 22, FOC 31, FOC 79 and NDFOC 98) representing race 1, 2, 5 and 6 grouped in clade I, while isolates (FOC 90, FOC 108 and FOC 88) belonging to race 3, 4 and 7 were clustered in clade II. Isolates (FOC 33, FOC 40, FOC 17 and FOC 100) representing race 2 had MAT-2 loci, while race 1 isolates (FOC 63, FOC 72 and FOC 76) contained MAT-1 loci only. The principal component analysis (PCA) of RAPD, ERIC, BOX and microsatellite marker data explained 39.94, 39.98, 42.04 and 62.59% of the total variation among test isolates, respectively. Furthermore, there was no correlation existed between genetic diversity, virulence, race compositions or geographic origin of the isolates. Overall, these findings will assist in better understanding of the genetic variability and ideally, will improve disease management practices. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

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