ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station

Uttarakhand, India

ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station

Uttarakhand, India
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Kishor A.,ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Verma S.K.,ICAR NBPGR Regional Station | Brijwal M.,ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Narayan R.,ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | And 3 more authors.
Research on Crops | Year: 2017

An experiment was conducted to evaluate the yield and physico-chemical performance of five kiwifruit cultivars viz., Monty, Hayward, Allison, Bruno and Abbott in the year 2016. The highest fruit yield (70.28 kg/tree), fruit length (71.73 mm), fruit weight (61.66 g) and fruit volume (60.41 cc) were recorded in cultivar Allison. The lowest fruit yield (25.12 kg/tree) and fruit length (52.20 mm) were recorded in Hayward, while lowest fruit weight (53.84 g) and fruit volume (52.70 cc) were estimated under Monty. The fruit firmness was found highest (7.53 lb/in2) in Hayward, while the lowest (2.37 lb/in2) in Monty. The highest T. S. S. (13.50 °B) was found in Allison, while lowest (11.67 °B) in Abbott, whereas highest acidity (2.39%) was recorded in Monty and lowest (1.89%) in Abbott. The highest ascorbic acid (110.47 mg/100 g), carotene content (354.33 μg/100 g) and total anti-oxidant activity (37.04 mMTE/L) was recorded in Bruno, while lowest ascorbic acid (89.52 mg/100 g) and total anti-oxidant activity (31.14 mMTE/L) were recorded in Hayward. The lowest carotene content (218.56 μg/100 g) was recorded in Monty. The highest reducing (7.04%) and total sugars (8.31%) were found in Monty, while lowest reducing (4.56%) and total sugars (5.10%) in Hayward. Therefore, Allison followed by Bruno cultivar of kiwifruit needs to be popularize in the region in view of yield and physicochemical performance.


Attri B.L.,ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Krishna H.,ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Krishna H.,Central Institute of Arid Horticulture | Ahmed N.,ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | And 2 more authors.
Indian Journal of Horticulture | Year: 2014

Amongst Rhododendron arboreum, Kilmora (Berberis asiatica), Ghengharu (Crataegus crenulata) and Galgal (Citrus pseudolimon), the highest (51.06 mg/100 ml) ascorbic acid was recorded in Galgal followed by Kilmora. The total antioxidants were found maximum (19.88 mM TE/l) in Rhododendron followed by Kilmora (14.12 mM TE/l). In all the treatments, TSS and acidity of the blended squashes was found to increase and decrease significantly faster at ambient (18-20oC) conditions than low (4oC) temperature. The highest (12.5 mg/100 ml) ascorbic acid was recorded in T9 (Galgal juice) and lowest (5.0 mg/100 ml) in T1, (Rhododendron juice) T5, (Kilmora juice) T7 (Ghengharu juice) and T8 (Ghengharu 15% + Galgal (5% + Ginger 5%), which was found to decrease significantly during storage both at ambient and low temperature. The reducing and total sugars in the blended squashes increased significantly during storage at both conditions. The total antioxidants were maximum (5.00 mM TE/l) in T1 (Rhododendron juice), which reduced to 4.65 and 4.84 mM TE/l after 6 months storage at ambient and low temperature respectively. Out of 10 treatments tried, the blended squashes (T2 Rhododendron 15% + Galgal 5% + ginger 5%, T4 Rhododendron 10% + Ghengharu 5% + Galgal 5% + ginger 5% and T3 Rhododendron 15% + Ghengharu 5% + Galgal 5%) prepared in combination with Rhododendron petal juice had an edge over other treatments (T1, T5, T6, T7, T8, T9, T10) in the overall quality. The prepared products had a shelf life of 6 months at ambient conditions, whereas at low temperature the products may be stored for one year without any microbial spoilage. The cost of production of the prepared products calculated was as low as 38.33 to 50.00% compared to the similar products (mango squash) available in the market. © 2015, Horticulture Society of India. All rights reserved.


Krishna H.,ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Krishna H.,ICAR Central Institute for Arid Horticulture | Attri B.L.,ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Kumar A.,ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Ahmed N.,ICAR Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2016

Sufficient evidences of the health benefits of wild edible fruits and their proven role in human nutrition are available. A number of wild but potentially commercialized fruits are existing in Himalayan regions of India such as red fruited ‘bayberry’ (Myrica esculenta Buch. Ham. ex D. Don) and ‘Yellow Himalayan Raspberry’ (Rubus ellipticus Smith), are amongst highly valued edible fruits. It would be advantageous to assess the antioxidant properties of these plants for possible use in the elaboration of functional foods or for consideration as potential sources of natural antioxidants. In this study, total carotenoids, flavanol, total flavonoids, O-dihydric phenol, total phenolics and total antioxidant capacity (measured by CUPRAC method) of underutilized fruit crops bayberry and yellow Himalayan raspberry based health beverages (ready-to-serve, RTS) stored at 5±2 °C for 10 weeks, were investigated. After the first two weeks in refrigerated storage, the RTSs showed an increase in total phenolics and total antioxidant capacity. However, at the end of the 10-week storage period, all RTSs exhibited a significant decline in total phenolics and total antioxidant capacity. However, total carotenoids appeared to be less affected during storage compared with the other antioxidants. © 2016, National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources (NISCAIR). All rights reserved.

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