Iberespacio

Madrid, Spain

Iberespacio

Madrid, Spain
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News Article | September 14, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

TEL AVIV, Israel--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Israeli SpaceIL team is one of five participants in the Google Lunar XPRIZE contest which will be won by the first contestant to reach the moon without governmental funding. IberEspacio has contributed to this mission by supplying the primary structure, the skeleton of the spacecraft, which has already been delivered to the SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), responsible for the construction of the spacecraft. IberEspacio’s participation worked for a year to produce the upper and lower panels, which will contain the propulsion system and all the electronic equipment, as well as the docking ring with the rocket launcher. All of the work was carried out in Spain, except for the carbon fiber struts, supplied by a Danish company. Dr. Eran Privman, SpaceIL CEO: “We are pleased to cooperate with the professional team at IberEspacio. Having the spacecraft structure enables us to start the Assembly, Integration and Testing (AIT) process at IAI facilities”. Opher Doron, IAI's Space Division General Manager: "IAI, the Space House of Israel, is honored to be part of the SpaceIL team, an educational and technological initiative that represents the best of Israel's technology. We are proud to take part and support this important project with IAI's best engineering minds, which combine all the technological and engineering know-how required to build such a complex space craft" For IberEspacio’s General Manager, Dr. Alejandro Torres, "participating in a pioneering and ambitious mission like SpaceIL by providing a key element like the primary structure is a source of pride for our company. Furthermore, we are contributing in a very special way, ensuring that Spanish technology continues to transcend borders by developing equipment in Spain that will land on the moon. For all this we are very grateful to SpaceIL and IAI for the trust they have placed in us." The structure manufactured by IberEspacio must guarantee the integrity of the spacecraft in spite of the strong vibrations that will affect it during launch and the impact that it may suffer on landing. The whole structure weighs less than 25 kilograms, which meet the demanding weight requirement. The teams responsible for SpaceIL and IAI can now start the assembly and integration phase, which starts with a special cleaning of the structure at high temperatures (“baking”). After they will finish, they will assemble the vehicle, install the equipment in it, and test the entire system to confirm that everything works perfectly before it is launched to the moon next year. 1. SpaceIL Primary Structure at IberEspacio Facilites previously to deliver to SpaceIL and IAI teams: http://iberespacio.es/img/IberEspacio_Spaceil_01.jpg 2. IberEspacio staff workgin on SpaceIL Primary Structure previously to delivery to SpaceIL and IAI teams: http://iberespacio.es/img/IberEspacio_Spaceil_02.jpg


Torres A.,IberEspacio | Mishkinis D.,IberEspacio | Kaya T.,Carleton University
Applied Thermal Engineering | Year: 2014

An entirely novel satellite thermal architecture, connecting the east and west radiators of a geostationary telecommunications satellite via loop heat pipes (LHPs), is proposed. The LHP operating temperature is regulated by using pressure regulating valves (PRVs). A transient numerical model is developed to simulate the thermal dynamic behavior of the proposed system. The details of the proposed architecture and mathematical model are presented. The model is used to analyze a set of critical design cases to identify potential failure modes prior to the qualification and in-orbit tests. The mathematical model results for critical cases are presented and discussed. The model results demonstrated the robustness and versatility of the proposed architecture under the predicted worst-case conditions. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Torres A.,IberEspacio | Mishkinis D.,IberEspacio | Kaya T.,Carleton University
Applied Thermal Engineering | Year: 2014

A novel satellite thermal architecture connecting the east and west radiators of a geostationary telecommunication satellite via loop heat pipes (LHPs) is flight tested on board the satellite Hispasat 1E. The LHP operating temperature is regulated by using pressure regulating valves (PRVs). The flight data demonstrated the successful operation of the proposed concept. A transient numerical model specifically developed for the design of this system satisfactorily simulated the flight data. The validated mathematical model can be used to design and analyze the thermal behavior of more complex architectures. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Rueda A.,Empresarios Agrupados | Avezuela R.,Empresarios Agrupados | Cobas P.,Empresarios Agrupados | Perez-Vara R.,IberEspacio
40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010 | Year: 2010

EcosimPro is used by the European Space Agency (ESA) as the standard tool to support Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) analysis. EcosimPro is a generic, flexible and modular tool based on the concept of object-oriented programming. It is capable of solving a large set of Differential-Algebraic equations (DAEs). These features make EcosimPro a multidisciplinary tool and as such it can be used to model different application domains, including electrical circuits, hydraulic networks and thermal and chemical systems, to name just a few. The new enhanced EcosimPro, version 4.6, released in November 2009, features numerous improvements. Among these are an upgraded wizard for creating mathematical models, customer deck generation for end users, a new attribute editor to configure component data more easily, improved treatment of post-processing results, and new wizards for performing parametric studies and optimization analyses. This paper shows how EcosimPro and its new capabilities make it easier for the user to model complex systems such as ECLS systems or two-phase heat transport devices. © 2010 by 2020. Published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.


Terrado E.,CSIC - Institute of Carbochemistry | Molina R.,Institute of Chemical and Environmental Chemistry of Barcelona | Natividad E.,University of Zaragoza | Castro M.,University of Zaragoza | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Physical Chemistry C | Year: 2011

Porous material is a critical component in the loop heat pipe (LHP) device, the efficiency of which depends on the thermal conductivity of the wick and its capillary capacity. A new bilayer wick based on ceramic material and carbon nanotubes in the outer surface has been designed. The thermal conductivity and capillary pressure of the surface of a ceramic LHP wick prototype have been modified by growing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The presence of a thin layer of MWCNTs increased the thermal conductivity of wick specimens between 18.87 and 26.42% for temperatures ranging from -50 to 50 °C. The thermal conductivity of the grown MWCNTs calculated considering a mean layer thickness of 5 μm was 59 W/mK. The effective pore diameter of zircon ceramic wicks decreased from 0.54 to 0.31 μm leading to an important increase in capillary pressure. The maximum heat transfer capacity and thermal resistance of the designed by-layer wick have been determined. The presence of carbon nanotubes decreases the thermal resistance and enabled the enhancement of the thermal and porous characteristics of the wicks in a promising way so as to optimize their performance as LHPs wicks. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Mishkinis D.,Iberespacio | Gregori C.,Iberespacio | Huidobro D.,Iberespacio | Torres A.,Iberespacio
41st International Conference on Environmental Systems 2011, ICES 2011 | Year: 2011

The experimental results of a propylene miniLHP with advanced stainless steel wick and novel design pressure regulating valve are presented and discussed in the paper. The LHP thermal control system has been designed for low power (below 30 W) and low temperature (control temperature set point -30 °C) operation. System has demonstrated outstanding performance and excellent capability of temperature control. The new design of pressure regulating valve allows to eliminate such undesirable effects as temperature oscillations and instability of start up and operation at low power regimes, to increase the system reliability and precision temperature control. The analysis of functionality of the pressure regulating valve as a thermal switch and temperature controller is presented. © 2011 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved.


Merino A.-S.,Thales Alenia | Hugon J.,Thales Alenia | Rousseau J.-J.,Thales Alenia | Rousseau J.-J.,Center Thermal laboratory | And 6 more authors.
41st International Conference on Environmental Systems 2011, ICES 2011 | Year: 2011

To face the thermal control challenges of future powerful telecommunication satellites, THALES ALENIA SPACE (TAS), is currently developing a two-phase mechanically pumped loop (2φMPDL) to transport the heat dissipation from an active antenna (up to 4kW) to dedicated large deployable radiators. After remaining shortly the thermal control design of the Active Antenna [8], this paper gives firstly an overview of mock up definition. The mock up has been designed in such a way to be representative in term of mass, power dissipation and thermal interfaces. The main part of the existing 6kW prototype (radiator, heat control accumulator, cooling system) is reused while the specific part (payload mock up) is manufactured. In a second part, the test plan and test sequence will be presented. The aim is to characterise the thermal performance of the thermal control for the sizing cases and to demonstrate the good behaviour for severe transient. The operational mode of the active antenna drives the cases which will be tested in steady state and transient. © 2011 by AS Merino. Published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.


Romera J.A.,IberEspacio | Pastor J.L.,IberEspacio | Alvarez J.,IberEspacio | Boix J.M.,IberEspacio | Torres A.,IberEspacio
41st International Conference on Environmental Systems 2011, ICES 2011 | Year: 2011

This paper presents the results obtained during the In-Orbit Test phase of the CREW Experiment, which was launched onboard the Hispasat 1E satellite on December 29th, 2010. The CREW is a technological demonstrator whose aim is to prove a concept for connecting the East and West panels of a typical telecom-sat, thereby enhancing the global heat rejection capability of the satellite. The main pieces of hardware included in the demonstrator are two Loop Heat Pipes with pressure regulation valves, which are connected to two radiator panels (East and West). The IOT campaign has demonstrated the capability of the system to adapt to the changing environmental and operational conditions, by rejecting the heat through the radiator which is in the most favorable conditions at each point of the orbit. © 2011 by Romera, J.A., Pastor, J.L., Alvarez, J., Boix, J.M., Torres, A. (IberEspacio).


Iwata N.,Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency | Ogawa H.,Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency | Molleda J.M.,IberEspacio | Takashima T.,Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency | Takahashi T.,Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
42nd International Conference on Environmental Systems 2012, ICES 2012 | Year: 2012

A thermal control system (TCS) of a microsatellite is proposed with loop heat pipes (LHPs) including bypass valves. "Free from restrictions in thermal design," all instruments can be mounted anywhere on the internal side of the six structure panels making up the satellite without concern for the thermal design of the entire satellite and other instruments. The temperatures of all instruments are maintained under any attitude (i.e., external thermal environment) by concentrating dissipated heat in a "center heat source" (CHS) using six LHPs mounted between the CHS and structure panels and other heat transport devices. An experimental study and numerical simulation are conducted to validate the microsatellite TCS. In the experimental study, two LHPs are connected to a heat source and a heat load is input to a condenser to simulate the heat input to a radiator in orbit. The heat from the heat source is successfully transported via one LHP if heat is input to the radiator connected to the second LHP. Orbital thermal analyses of the microsatellite are also conducted. Typical low-Earth, geostationary, and polar orbits are investigated for spinning and three-axis stabilized satellites. Heat from the CHS is transported via the LHPs, and the CHS temperature is maintained within the required temperature range in all analysis cases as a result of bypass valve operation. © 2012 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved.

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