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Hitachi, Japan

Ibaraki Christian University is a private university in Hitachi, Ibaraki, Japan, established in 1967. The predecessor of the University, Ibaraki Christian College, was founded in 1949.Ibaraki Christian University has liaisons and student-exchange programs with a number of universities outside Japan. These include Oklahoma Christian University, with which McMillan was also involved.The institution has had an international focus from its inception. Wikipedia.


Sengoku Y.,University of Tsukuba | Nakamura K.,Ibaraki Christian University | Ogata H.,University of Tsukuba | Nabekura Y.,University of Tsukuba | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance | Year: 2015

The current case study intended to measure blood glucose fluctuation in 2 marathon runners during a 100-km race using a continuous glucose-monitoring system (CGMS) and investigate the relationship between glucose profile and change in running speed. Two experienced ultramarathon runners participated in this study. A CGMS glucose sensor was inserted into the subcutaneous abdominal tissue at 35 h before the 100-km race, and the glucose profile was monitored continuously until the end of the race. Race pace and energy intake during the race were recorded. Participants finished the race in 6h:51min:17s (runner A) and 8h:56min:04s (runner B), and the race-pace decrement ratios were 17.6% for runner A and 27.2% for runner B. The average relative intensity throughout the 100-km race was 89.9% ± 5.8% lactate threshold (LT) in runner A and 78.4% ± 8.6% LT in runner B. The total amount of carbohydrate intake during the race was 249 g and 366 g in runners A and B, respectively. Despite lower carbohydrate intake, runner A maintained a normal glucose level throughout the race, while runner B rapidly decreased blood glucose and became hypoglycemic after the 80-km point. These results suggest that elite ultramarathon runners may have the ability to prevent a large decrement in blood glucose level regardless of the amount of energy intake during the race to maintain higher relative running intensity. © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc. Source


Matsui Y.,Japan National Traffic Safety and Environment Laboratory | Hitosugi M.,Dokkyo Medical University | Takahashi K.,Japan National Traffic Safety and Environment Laboratory | Doi T.,Ibaraki Christian University
Traffic Injury Prevention | Year: 2013

Objective: To reduce the severity of injuries and the number of pedestrian deaths in traffic accidents, active safety devices providing pedestrian detection are considered effective countermeasures. The features of car-to-pedestrian collisions need to be known in detail to develop such safety devices.Methods: Because information on real-world accidents is limited, this study investigated near-miss situations captured by drive recorders installed in passenger cars. We showed similarities of the contact situation between near-miss incidents and real-world fatal pedestrian accidents in Japan. We analyzed the near-miss incident data via video capturing pedestrians crossing the road in front of forward-moving cars. Using a video frame captured by a drive recorder, the time to collision (TTC) was calculated from the car velocity and the distance between the car and pedestrian at the moment that the pedestrian initially appeared.Results: The average TTC in the cases where pedestrians were not using a pedestrian crossing was shorter than that in the cases where pedestrians were using a pedestrian crossing. The average TTC in the cases where pedestrians emerged from behind obstructions was shorter than that in the cases where drivers had unobstructed views of the pedestrians.Conclusions: We propose that the specifications of the safety device for pedestrian detection and automatic braking should reflect the severe approach situation for a pedestrian and car including the TTC observed for near-miss incidents. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Source


Itakura H.,Ibaraki Christian University | Nakaya N.,Nakaya Clinic | Kusunoki T.,Japanese Society for Pharmacoepidemiology | Shimizu N.,Teikyo University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2011

Objective: This long-term event monitoring (LEM) study was designed to evaluate the long-term lipid-lowering efficacy and safety of fluvastatin (Lochol®, Novartis A.G.) along with the incidence of cardiac and other events, and safety of fluvastatin in Japanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Methods: Patients (n= 21,139) who started fluvastatin between April 1, 2000 and March 31, 2002, across 2563 centers in Japan were prospectively registered and followed up for 3 years (secondary prevention cohort) or 5 years (primary prevention cohort). Results: Of the patients registered, 19,084 were included in this analysis. Levels of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and total cholesterol (TC) decreased significantly in the primary (-27.1% and -18.8%) and secondary (-25.3% and -18.4%) prevention cohorts. Reductions in LDL-C (-22.1 vs. -18.2%, p< 0.0001) and TC (-16.1 vs. -13.1%, p< 0.0001) levels were significantly greater among patients aged ≥65 than <65 years old. Overall, 1.7% (146/8563) and 1.1% (93/8563) of patients aged ≥65 years old experienced confirmed cardiac and cerebral events, compared with 1.1% (112/10,517) and 0.3% (28/10,517) of patients aged <65 years old (p= 0.0002 and <0.0001, respectively). Incidence of cardiac and cerebral events was lowest in patients aged <65 years old in the primary prevention cohort and highest among patients aged ≥65 years old in the secondary prevention cohort. Adverse events were reported in 7.9% (1501/19,084) of patients. Conclusion: This large-scale, prospective, uncontrolled study confirmed the lipid-lowering efficacy and safety of long-term fluvastatin treatment for hypercholesterolemia in Japanese patients aged ≥65 years old. The higher incidence of cardiac and cerebral events in patients aged ≥65 years old in the secondary prevention cohort reflects a high-risk clinical profile with multiple classic risk factors warranting multifactorial interventions. © 2011 Japanese College of Cardiology. Source


Matsui Y.,Japan National Traffic Safety and Environment Laboratory | Hitosugi M.,Dokkyo Medical University | Doi T.,Ibaraki Christian University | Oikawa S.,Japan National Traffic Safety and Environment Laboratory | And 2 more authors.
Traffic Injury Prevention | Year: 2013

Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the severe conditions between car-to-pedestrian near-miss situations using pedestrian time-to-vehicle (pedestrian TTV) which is the time when the pedestrian would reach the forward moving car line. Methods: Since the information available from the real-world accidents was limited, the authors focused on the near-miss situations captured by driving recorders installed in passenger cars. In their previous study, the authors found there were some similarities between accidents and near-miss incidents. It was made clear that the situations in pedestrians' accidents could be estimated from the near-miss incident data which included motion pictures capturing pedestrian behaviors. In their previous study, the vehicle time-to-collision (vehicle TTC) was investigated from the near-miss incident data. The authors analyzed data for 101 near-miss car-to-pedestrian incident events in which pedestrians were crossing the roads in front of a forward-moving car at an intersection or on a straight road. Using a video of near-miss car-to-pedestrian incidents captured by drive recorders and collected by the Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan (J-SAE) from 2005 to 2009, the pedestrian TTV was calculated. Based on the calculated pedestrian TTV, one of the severe conditions between car-to-pedestrian near-miss situations was evaluated for pedestrians who emerged from behind an obstruction such as a building, a parked vehicle and a moving vehicle. Results: Focusing on the cases of the pedestrians who emerged from behind an obstruction, the averages of the vehicle TTC and pedestrian TTV were 1.31 and 1.05 seconds, respectively, and did not demonstrate a significant difference. Since the averages of the vehicle TTC and pedestrian TTV were similar, there would be a higher possibility of the contact between a car and pedestrian if the driver and pedestrian were not paying any attention. Conclusions: The authors propose that a moving speed of a pedestrian surrogate "dummy" should be determined considering the near-miss incident situations for the evaluation of a CDMBS for pedestrian detection. The authors also propose that the time-to-collision of the dummy to the tested car during the evaluation of the performance of the CDMBS for pedestrian detection should be determined considering the time such as the vehicle TTC in this study. Additionally or alternatively, the pedestrian TTV should be considered, in which the worst situation was assumed for a car that was moving toward a pedestrian without braking due to the car driver's inattentiveness and the pedestrian not slowing down their walking speed or stopping. © 2013 Copyright TF. Source


Morishita R.,Osaka University | Itakura H.,Ibaraki Christian University | Nakaya N.,Nakaya Clinic | Yoshida M.,Tokyo Medical and Dental University | And 3 more authors.
Current Vascular Pharmacology | Year: 2012

Objective: The long-term event monitoring (LEM) study evaluated the lipid-lowering efficacy and safety of fluvastatin in Japanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. The present sub-analysis focused on the impact of risk factors on event prevention. Methods: In the LEM study, patients (n=21,139) who started fluvastatin between 2000/4/1 and 2002/3/31 in Japan were prospectively registered and followed up for 3 years (secondary prevention cohort) or 5 years (primary prevention cohort). Results: Of the patients registered, 19,084 were included in this sub-analysis. The secondary prevention group, demonstrated 8.27- and 2.89-fold higher incidence in cardiac events and cerebral events, respectively compared with the primary prevention group (P<0.001). Complications of cerebrovascular disease demonstrated a 2.22- and 5.29-fold higher incidence in cardiac events and cerebral events (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively). Presence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients without complication significantly increased the incidence in both cardiac events (2.37) and cerebral events (2.15) as compared with non-DM patients for primary prevention (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively). For the secondary prevention, DM patients with complication of cardiac disease showed a significantly higher incidence in both cardiac events (1.59) and cerebral events (3.79) compared with non-DM patients (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). In contrast, DM patients with complications of cerebrovascular disease showed a significantly higher incidence in cerebral events (2.58, P<0.05), but not cardiac events compared with non-DM patients. Similarly, the presence of hypertension significantly increased the incidence in both cardiac (1.64) and cerebral events (1.81) for primary prevention (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). For secondary prevention, hypertension in patients with complication of cardiac or cerebrovascular disease did not affect incidence in both cardiac and cerebral events. In the patients without complication, high triglycerides and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), but not low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), increased cerebral events, while only LDL-C significantly increased cardiac events. For secondary prevention, high triglycerides or low HDL-C, but not LDL-C, significantly increased the relative risk of cardiac events in the patients with complication of cardiac disease. Conclusions: The LEM study, a large-scale prospective study of long-term fluvastatin treatment for hypercholesterolemia in Japanese patients, demonstrated high impact of complications such as DM and hypertension as well as high triglycerides or low HDL-C on cardiac and cerebral events. After long-term statin treatment, the control of other factors rather than LDL-C alone might be important to avoid vascular events. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. Source

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