IAV Automotive Engineering Inc.

MI, United States

IAV Automotive Engineering Inc.

MI, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

One of the big stumbling blocks preventing the wide scale acceptance of electric cars is dreaded range anxiety. With an average range of around 100 mi (161 km) per charge, all-electric vehicles still can't compete with more conventional cars – especially if lights, windscreen wipers, or air con are needed. To level the playing field a bit, Fraunhofer is working on a new battery design that could increase an electric car's range to 1,000 km (621 mi). Electric cars don't have a single battery, but a collection of battery packs made of hundreds or thousands of individual battery cells that are packed in and wired together. These separate battery cells each require a housing as well as terminals, wiring, cables, and electronic monitors, which all combine to take up 50 percent of the space of a whole battery pack. Additionally, all those electrical connections sap away current through resistance. In partnership with ThyssenKrupp System Engineering and IAV Automotive Engineering, the Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS in Dresden is developing EMBATT, a new type of battery that reduces the number of those components in a much simpler design that would free up space that could be used to provide extra electricity storage capacity. EMBATT takes its cue from another electrical power source, the fuel cell. Fuel cells work by combining oxygen with a gas, like hydrogen or methane, across a permeable membrane, to generate electricity. One key component of such cells is what is called a bipolar plate. This plate covers both sides of the cell and has a number of functions, but its main purpose is to act as the electrodes to collect the electricity produced by the cell with one plate acting as the anode and the other as the cathode. Fraunhofer's idea is to replace the housings and individual connectors in the battery packs with similar plates. Instead of setting the battery cells next to each other, they would be stacked directly one on top of one other over a large area and covered by plates, which would carry the current across its surface. This would not only simplify the design, but greatly reduce resistance, making more electricity available more quickly. In the Fraunhofer design, this bipolar plate is in the form of a metallic tape that's coated on both sides with a powdered ceramic mixed with polymers and electrically conductive materials. The ceramic acts as an energy storage medium, with one side of the tape acting as the anode and the other as the cathode depending on the formulation of the coating. Fraunhofer says that this arrangement would allow for easy manufacturing and long service life. The upshot of all this is that electric cars could carry bigger batteries that don't takes up more space or add weight, giving cars a range of 1,000 km (621 mi) in the medium term. So far EMBATT has been confined to the laboratory, but the partners are working on scaling up the technology for installation in test vehicles by 2020.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: phys.org

Production of the bipolar electrode on a pilot scale. Credit: Fraunhofer IKTS You cannot get far today with electric cars. One reason is that the batteries require a lot of space. Fraunhofer scientists are stacking large cells on top of one another. This provides vehicles with more power. Initial tests in the laboratory have been positive. In the medium term, the project partners are striving to achieve a range of 1000 kilometers for electric vehicles. Depending on the model, electric cars are equipped with hundreds to thousands of separate battery cells. Each one is surrounded by a housing, connected to the car via terminals and cables, and monitored by sensors. The housing and contacting take up more than 50 percent of the space. Therefore, the cells cannot be densely packed together as preferred. The complex design steals space. A further problem: Electrical resistances, which reduce the power, are generated at the connections of the small-scale cells. Under the brand name EMBATT, the Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS in Dresden and its partners have transferred the bipolar principle known from fuel cells to the lithium battery. In this approach, individual battery cells are not strung separately side-by-side in small sections; instead, they are stacked directly one above the other across a large area. The entire structure for the housing and the contacting is therefore eliminated. As a result, more batteries fit into the car. Through the direct connection of the cells in the stack, the current flows over the entire surface of the battery. The electrical resistance is thereby considerably reduced. The electrodes of the battery are designed to release and absorb energy very quickly. "With our new packaging concept, we hope to increase the range of electric cars in the medium term up to 1000 kilometers," says Dr. Mareike Wolter, Project Manager at Fraunhofer IKTS. The approach is already working in the laboratory. The partners are ThyssenKrupp System Engineering and IAV Automotive Engineering. The most important component of the battery is the bipolar electrode – a metallic tape that is coated on both sides with ceramic storage materials. As a result, one side becomes the anode, the other the cathode. As the heart of the battery, it stores the energy. "We use our expertise in ceramic technologies to design the electrodes in such a way that they need as little space as possible, save a lot of energy, are easy to manufacture and have a long life," says Wolter. Ceramic materials are used as powders. The scientists mix them with polymers and electrically conductive materials to form a suspension. "This formulation has to be specially developed – adapted for the front and back of the tape, respectively," Wolter explains. The Fraunhofer IKTS applies the suspension to the tape in a roll-to-roll process. "One of the core competencies of our institute is to adapt ceramic materials from the laboratory to a pilot scale and to reproduce them reliably," says Wolter, describing the expertise of the Dresden scientists. The next planned step is the development of larger battery cells and their installation in electric cars. The partners are aiming for initial tests in vehicles by 2020. Explore further: Freezing lithium batteries may make them safer and bendable


DUBAI, UAE / ACCESSWIRE / May 24, 2017 / An innovative battery that is in the process of being built could change the landscape for electric run cars as well as oil run cars. The average person drives about 30 miles (48 kilometers) per day, according to AAA, and yet, many people are still hesitant to buy electric cars that can travel three times the said distance on a single charge. This driving range anxiety is one of the reasons why gasoline and oil-powered vehicles still rule the road. A team of scientists are working to ease those fears. Mareike Wolter, Project Manager of Mobile Energy Storage Systems at Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft in Dresden, Germany, is working with a team to develop a new battery that will give electric cars the ability to travel a range of approximately 620 miles (1,000 km) on a single charge - thus giving electric cars more edge than oil-powered vehicles. Wolter said his team was working on the project three years ago when researchers from Fraunhofer as well as ThyssenKrupp System Engineering and IAV Automotive Engineering started researching how they could improve the energy density of automotive lithium batteries. His team turned to the popular electric car producer, Tesla, as their starting point. Tesla's latest vehicle unit, the Model S 100D has a 100-kilowatt-hour battery pack, which gives it an estimated range of 335 miles (540 km). The pack is 16 feet long, 6 feet wide and 4 inches thick. Each pack contains 8,000 lithium-ion battery cells individually packaged inside a cylinder that measures about 2 to 3 inches (6 to 7 centimeters) high. "We thought if we could use the same space as the battery in the Tesla, but improve the energy density and finally drive 1,000 km, this would be nice," Wolter said. Wolter also added that one way of improving the energy density is to refine the materials inside the battery so that it can store more energy. They have also improved the design to be able to carry the 16 feet long battery stylishly. 50 percent of each battery cell is made of components such as the housing, the anode (battery's negative terminal), the cathode (battery's positive terminal) and the electrolyte, the liquid that transports all the charged particles. They have added an additional space inside the car to wire the battery packs in the vehicle's electrical system. "It's a lot of wasted space. You have a lot of inactive components in the system, and that's a problem from our point of view," said Wolter. The scientists were challenged to reimagine the entire design, they said. To make the design work, they got rid of the housings and encased each battery to a thin sheet-like design instead of the normal cylindrical space. The metallic sheet is coated with an energy-storage material made from powdered ceramic mixed with a polymer binder. One side serves as the cathode while the other side serves as the anode. The researchers stacked several of these so-called bipolar electrodes one on top of the other, like sheets of paper in a ream, separating the electrodes by thin layers of electrolytes and a material that prevents electrical charges from shorting out the whole system. The " ream" is sealed within a package measuring about 10 square feet (1 square meter), and connects on the top and bottom to the car's electrical system. The goal is to build a battery system that fits in the same space as the one used by Tesla's vehicles or other electric vehicles, the researchers said. "We can put more electrodes storing the energy in the same amount of space," Wolter said. She added that the researchers aim to have such a system ready to test in cars by 2020. In Yemen, most cars are still reliant on oil and gas. 33.9% of the population live in urban areas and up until now the means for transportation is limited. In fact, Yemen remains to be one of the few countries worldwide that continue to use gasoline to power its cars and other vehicles. This is because there are very few lead-free petrol stations in the country. With research focused on bringing electric cars to Yemen, the impact on the environment would be astronomical. In 2008, Yemen's Ministry of Environment and Water acknowledged the severity of the problem and started working on a national strategy to reduce air pollution. The authorities have implemented a few simple measures to improve the air quality. Vehicles which were manufactured before the year 2000 are no longer permitted entry in the country. The authorities have also reduced the tax on new cars to encourage more people to invest in modern and more environment-friendly vehicles. Most of all, electric cars do not emit climate-damaging CO2 or health-harming nitrogen oxide. They do not make any noise and they are very easy to operate. Electric vehicles seem to have a lot of advantages over cars that run on gasoline or diesel. It is easy to see how they come in handy for the German government to reach its aim of a 40% cut in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 compared to 1994. By then, there is to be one million electric cars on German roads. Germany was once regarded as the 'sleeping giant of electric vehicles' and now, they are aggressively working towards this vision. This is a lofty ambition considering that the milestone of one million global cumulative EV sales was only passed in the fall of last year, and the German EV fleet currently only numbers 55,000. If Germany was able to make an ambitious goal, that's so impossible - yet have been thoroughly working on it in baby steps - what more for Yemen? There is so much potential to develop new batteries and solar panels. If this kind of technology will be applied and be funded by the government and enough research will be conducted to produce more electric cars and power sources in Yemen, then, this will surely be a good breakthrough. Our country is known for the rich oil it produces, but coming up with an innovation like this would save our resources and create more jobs for Yemenis. Haitham Alaini is a Yemen entrepreneur and philanthropist. Alaini received a degree in economics from George Washington University, and upon his return to Yemen, created his own construction business specializing in oil and gas infrastructure. Alaini strives to highlight beneficial resources for his fellow citizens, exemplify how businesses can support Yemen, and demonstrate his love for his country. DUBAI, UAE / ACCESSWIRE / May 24, 2017 / An innovative battery that is in the process of being built could change the landscape for electric run cars as well as oil run cars. The average person drives about 30 miles (48 kilometers) per day, according to AAA, and yet, many people are still hesitant to buy electric cars that can travel three times the said distance on a single charge. This driving range anxiety is one of the reasons why gasoline and oil-powered vehicles still rule the road. A team of scientists are working to ease those fears. Mareike Wolter, Project Manager of Mobile Energy Storage Systems at Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft in Dresden, Germany, is working with a team to develop a new battery that will give electric cars the ability to travel a range of approximately 620 miles (1,000 km) on a single charge - thus giving electric cars more edge than oil-powered vehicles. Wolter said his team was working on the project three years ago when researchers from Fraunhofer as well as ThyssenKrupp System Engineering and IAV Automotive Engineering started researching how they could improve the energy density of automotive lithium batteries. His team turned to the popular electric car producer, Tesla, as their starting point. Tesla's latest vehicle unit, the Model S 100D has a 100-kilowatt-hour battery pack, which gives it an estimated range of 335 miles (540 km). The pack is 16 feet long, 6 feet wide and 4 inches thick. Each pack contains 8,000 lithium-ion battery cells individually packaged inside a cylinder that measures about 2 to 3 inches (6 to 7 centimeters) high. "We thought if we could use the same space as the battery in the Tesla, but improve the energy density and finally drive 1,000 km, this would be nice," Wolter said. Wolter also added that one way of improving the energy density is to refine the materials inside the battery so that it can store more energy. They have also improved the design to be able to carry the 16 feet long battery stylishly. 50 percent of each battery cell is made of components such as the housing, the anode (battery's negative terminal), the cathode (battery's positive terminal) and the electrolyte, the liquid that transports all the charged particles. They have added an additional space inside the car to wire the battery packs in the vehicle's electrical system. "It's a lot of wasted space. You have a lot of inactive components in the system, and that's a problem from our point of view," said Wolter. The scientists were challenged to reimagine the entire design, they said. To make the design work, they got rid of the housings and encased each battery to a thin sheet-like design instead of the normal cylindrical space. The metallic sheet is coated with an energy-storage material made from powdered ceramic mixed with a polymer binder. One side serves as the cathode while the other side serves as the anode. The researchers stacked several of these so-called bipolar electrodes one on top of the other, like sheets of paper in a ream, separating the electrodes by thin layers of electrolytes and a material that prevents electrical charges from shorting out the whole system. The " ream" is sealed within a package measuring about 10 square feet (1 square meter), and connects on the top and bottom to the car's electrical system. The goal is to build a battery system that fits in the same space as the one used by Tesla's vehicles or other electric vehicles, the researchers said. "We can put more electrodes storing the energy in the same amount of space," Wolter said. She added that the researchers aim to have such a system ready to test in cars by 2020. In Yemen, most cars are still reliant on oil and gas. 33.9% of the population live in urban areas and up until now the means for transportation is limited. In fact, Yemen remains to be one of the few countries worldwide that continue to use gasoline to power its cars and other vehicles. This is because there are very few lead-free petrol stations in the country. With research focused on bringing electric cars to Yemen, the impact on the environment would be astronomical. In 2008, Yemen's Ministry of Environment and Water acknowledged the severity of the problem and started working on a national strategy to reduce air pollution. The authorities have implemented a few simple measures to improve the air quality. Vehicles which were manufactured before the year 2000 are no longer permitted entry in the country. The authorities have also reduced the tax on new cars to encourage more people to invest in modern and more environment-friendly vehicles. Most of all, electric cars do not emit climate-damaging CO2 or health-harming nitrogen oxide. They do not make any noise and they are very easy to operate. Electric vehicles seem to have a lot of advantages over cars that run on gasoline or diesel. It is easy to see how they come in handy for the German government to reach its aim of a 40% cut in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 compared to 1994. By then, there is to be one million electric cars on German roads. Germany was once regarded as the 'sleeping giant of electric vehicles' and now, they are aggressively working towards this vision. This is a lofty ambition considering that the milestone of one million global cumulative EV sales was only passed in the fall of last year, and the German EV fleet currently only numbers 55,000. If Germany was able to make an ambitious goal, that's so impossible - yet have been thoroughly working on it in baby steps - what more for Yemen? There is so much potential to develop new batteries and solar panels. If this kind of technology will be applied and be funded by the government and enough research will be conducted to produce more electric cars and power sources in Yemen, then, this will surely be a good breakthrough. Our country is known for the rich oil it produces, but coming up with an innovation like this would save our resources and create more jobs for Yemenis. Haitham Alaini is a Yemen entrepreneur and philanthropist. Alaini received a degree in economics from George Washington University, and upon his return to Yemen, created his own construction business specializing in oil and gas infrastructure. Alaini strives to highlight beneficial resources for his fellow citizens, exemplify how businesses can support Yemen, and demonstrate his love for his country.


DUBAI, UAE / ACCESSWIRE / May 24, 2017 / An innovative battery that is in the process of being built could change the landscape for electric run cars as well as oil run cars. The average person drives about 30 miles (48 kilometers) per day, according to AAA, and yet, many people are still hesitant to buy electric cars that can travel three times the said distance on a single charge. This driving range anxiety is one of the reasons why gasoline and oil-powered vehicles still rule the road. A team of scientists working to ease those fears. Mareike Wolter, Project Manager of Mobile Energy Storage Systems at Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft in Dresden, Germany, is working with a team to develop a new battery that will give electric cars the ability to travel a range of approximately 620 miles (1,000 km) on a single charge - thus giving electric cars more edge than oil-powered vehicles. Wolter said his team was working on the project three years ago when researchers from Fraunhofer as well as ThyssenKrupp System Engineering and IAV Automotive Engineering started researching how they could improve the energy density of automotive lithium batteries. His team turned to the popular electric car producer, Tesla, as their starting point. Tesla's latest vehicle unit, the Model S 100D has a 100-kilowatt-hour battery pack, which gives it an estimated range of 335 miles (540 km). The pack is 16 feet long, 6 feet wide and 4 inches thick. Each pack contains 8,000 lithium-ion battery cells individually packaged inside a cylinder that measures about 2 to 3 inches (6 to 7 centimeters) high. "We thought if we could use the same space as the battery in the Tesla, but improve the energy density and finally drive 1,000 km, this would be nice," Wolter said. Wolter also added that one way of improving the energy density is to refine the materials inside the battery so that it can store more energy. They have also improved the design to be able to carry the 16 feet long battery stylishly. 50 percent of each battery cell is made of components such as the housing, the anode (battery's negative terminal), the cathode (battery's positive terminal) and the electrolyte, the liquid that transports all the charged particles. They have added an additional space inside the car to wire the battery packs in the vehicle's electrical system. "It's a lot of wasted space. You have a lot of inactive components in the system, and that's a problem from our point of view," said Wolter. The scientists were challenged to reimagine the entire design, they said. To make the design work, they got rid of the housings and encased each battery to a thin sheet-like design instead of the normal cylindrical space. The metallic sheet is coated with an energy-storage material made from powdered ceramic mixed with a polymer binder. One side serves as the cathode while the other side serves as the anode. The researchers stacked several of these so-called bipolar electrodes one on top of the other, like sheets of paper in a ream, separating the electrodes by thin layers of electrolytes and a material that prevents electrical charges from shorting out the whole system. The " " is sealed within a package measuring about 10 square feet (1 square and connects on the top and bottom to the car's electrical system. The goal is to build a battery system that fits in the same space as the one used by Tesla's vehicles or other electric vehicles, the researchers said. "We can put more electrodes storing the energy in the same amount of space," Wolter said. She added that the researchers aim to have such a system ready to test in cars by 2020. In Yemen, most cars are still reliant on oil and gas. 33.9% of the population live in urban areas and up until now the means for transportation is limited. In fact, Yemen remains to be one of the few countries worldwide that continue to use gasoline to power its cars and other vehicles. This is because there are very few lead-free petrol stations in the country. With research focused on bringing electric cars to Yemen, the impact on the environment would be astronomical. In 2008, Yemen's Ministry of Environment and Water acknowledged the severity of the problem and started working on a national strategy to reduce air pollution. The authorities have implemented a few simple measures to improve the air quality. Vehicles which were manufactured before the year 2000 are no longer permitted entry in the country. The authorities have also reduced the tax on new cars to encourage more people to invest in modern and more environment-friendly vehicles. Most of all, electric cars do not emit climate-damaging CO2 or health-harming nitrogen oxide. They do not make any noise and they are very easy to operate. Electric vehicles seem to have a lot of advantages over cars that run on gasoline or diesel. It is easy to see how they come in handy for the German government to reach its aim of a 40% cut in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 compared to 1994. By then, there to be one million electric cars on German roads. Germany was once regarded as the 'sleeping giant of electric vehicles' and now, they are aggressively working towards this vision. This is a lofty ambition considering that the milestone of one million global cumulative EV sales was only passed in the fall of last year, and the German EV fleet currently only numbers 55,000. If Germany was able to make an ambitious goal, that's so impossible - yet have been thoroughly working on it in baby steps - what more for Yemen? There is so much potential to develop new batteries and solar panels. If this kind of technology will be applied and be funded by the government and enough research will be conducted to produce more electric cars and power sources in Yemen, then, this will surely be a good breakthrough. Our country is known for the rich oil it produces, but coming up with an innovation like this would save our resources and create more jobs for Yemenis. Haitham Alaini is a Yemen entrepreneur and philanthropist. Alaini received a degree in economics from George Washington University, and upon his return to Yemen, created his own construction business specializing in oil and gas infrastructure. Alaini strives to highlight beneficial resources for his fellow citizens, exemplify how businesses can support Yemen, and demonstrate his love for his country.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

The average American drives about 30 miles (48 kilometers) per day, , yet many people are still reluctant to buy electric cars that can travel three times that distance on a single charge. This so-called range anxiety is one reason gasoline-powered vehicles still rule the road, but a team of scientists is working to ease those fears. Mareike Wolter, Project Manager of Mobile Energy Storage Systems at Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft in Dresden, Germany, is working with a team on a new battery that would give electric cars a range of about 620 miles (1,000 km) on a single charge. Wolter said the project began about three years ago when researchers from Fraunhofer as well as ThyssenKrupp System Engineering and IAV Automotive Engineering started brainstorming about how they could improve the energy density of automotive lithium batteries. They turned to the popular all-electric car, the Tesla, as a starting point. [Hyperloop, Jetpacks & More: 9 Futuristic Transit Ideas] Tesla’s latest vehicle, the Model S 100D has a 100-kilowatt-hour battery pack, which reportedly gives it a range of 335 miles (540 km). The pack is large, about 16 feet long, 6 feet wide and 4 inches thick. It contains more than 8,000 lithium-ion battery cells, each one individually packaged inside a cylinder housing that measures about 2 to 3 inches (6 to 7 centimeters) high and about 0.8 inches (2 cm) across. "We thought if we could use the same space as the battery in the Tesla, but improve the energy density and finally drive 1,000 km, this would be nice," Wolter told Live Science. One way of doing this would be to refine the materials inside the battery so that it could store more energy, she said. But another way would be to improve the system's design as a whole, Wolter said. [Infographic: An Inside Look at How Batteries Work] Nearly 50 percent of each cell is devoted to components such as the housing, the anode (the battery's negative terminal), the cathode (the battery's positive terminal) and the electrolyte, the liquid that transports the charged particles. Additional space is needed inside the car to wire the battery packs to the vehicle's electrical system. "It's a lot of wasted space," Wolter said. "You have a lot of inactive components in the system, and that's a problem from our point of view." The scientists decided to reimagine the entire design, they said. To do so, they got rid of the housings that encase individual batteries and turned to a thin, sheet-like design instead of a cylinder. Their metallic sheet is coated with an energy-storage material made from powdered ceramic mixed with a polymer binder. One side serves as the cathode, and other side serves as the anode. The researchers stacked several of these so-called bipolar electrodes one on top of the other, like sheets of paper in a ream, separating the electrodes by thin layers of electrolyte and a material that prevents electrical charges from shorting out the whole system. The "ream" is sealed within a package measuring about 10 square feet (1square meter), and contacts on the top and bottom connect to the car's electrical system. The goal is to build a battery system that fits in the same space as the one used by Tesla's vehicles or other electric vehicles, the researchers said. "We can put more electrodes storing the energy in the same space," Wolter said. She added that the researchers aim to have such a system ready to test in cars by 2020.


Leesch M.,IAV Automotive Engineering Inc. | Schreiterer E.,IAV Automotive Engineering Inc. | Mutha G.,IAV India Pvt
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2017

The paper presents a new 7-speed dual-clutch transmission (DCT) for transverse applications and a torque capacity of 200 Nm with an option for 300 Nm engine torque. Advantageously the system is designed for supplier parts of dual-clutch system, gear and clutch actuation, differential as well as bearings, synchronizers and additional standardized parts. The actuation could be also realized by an already developed hydraulic module which can be used and produced locally with supplier parts of valves, sensors and so on. Furthermore, the gear set is a state-of-the-art system which can be supplied by manual transmission manufacturer. Beside the cost focus. the DCT has a favorable gear set in terms of robustness and compactness. The design with a total length of 350 mm is realized through a common gear on the main shaft for each gear pair on the countershafts and multiple use of gears in the first speed. The influence of these dependencies on the series of ratios is quite less with this new transmission system. The reverse speed is realized without an idler gear only by engaged countershafts which is more robust, efficient and state-of-the-art. Moreover, the layout and the design is made for a maximum flexibility of ratios and center distances between the transmission input and output shaft. This realizes a usage of the system from A- to SUV-segment. Finally, the hybridization could be realized by a cost effective P2 configuration from mild to full hybrid. The additional oil pump and the modifications of the hydraulic system are already recognized and integrated in the already developed alternative hydraulic module. © 2017 SAE International.


Morales D.O.,Umeå University | Westerberg S.,Umeå University | La Hera P.X.,Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences | Mettin U.,IAV Automotive Engineering Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Field Robotics | Year: 2014

Working with forestry machines requires a great deal of training to be sufficiently skilled to operate forestry cranes. In view of this, it would be desirable within the forestry industry to introduce automated motions, such as those seen in robotic arms, to shorten the training time and make the work of the operator easier. Motivated by this fact, we have developed two experimental platforms for testing control systems and motion-planning algorithms in real time. They correspond to a laboratory setup and a commercial version of a hydraulic manipulator used in forwarder machines. The aim of this article is to present the results of this development by providing an overview of our trajectory-planning algorithm and motion-control method, with a subsequent view of the experimental results. For motion control, we design feedback controllers that are able to track reference trajectories based on sensor measurements. Likewise, we provide arguments to design controllers in an open-loop for machines that lack sensing devices. Relying on the tracking efficiency of these controllers, we design time-efficient reference trajectories of motions that correspond to logging tasks. To demonstrate performance, we provide an overview of extensive testing done on these machines. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Jiang S.,AandD Technology Inc. | Nutter D.,AandD Technology Inc. | Gullitti A.,IAV Automotive Engineering Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2012

To meet the ever increasing requirements in the areas of performance, fuel economy and emission, more and more subsystems and control functions are being added to modern engines. This leads to a quick increase in the number of control parameters and consequently dramatic time and cost increase for engine calibration. To deal with this problem, the automotive industry has turned to model-based calibration for a solution. Model-based calibration is a method that uses modern Design of Experiments (DoE), statistical modeling and optimization techniques to efficiently produce high quality calibrations for engines. There are two major enablers for carrying out this method-fully automated engine control and measurement system, and advanced mathematical tools for DoE, modeling and optimization. This paper presents a case study of adopting this methodology for the determination of optimum steady state calibrations of ignition timing, air-fuel ratio and intake cam phasing for a gasoline engine. ORION automated engine control and measurement system is used for testing data collection. EasyDoE Toolsuite is used for DoE, engine response modeling and control parameter optimization. Major features of these tools are described. Each step in performing this process, including definition of factors and responses, DoE, automatic measurement on engine test bench, creation of engine models of sufficient accuracy, and generation of control maps using optimization techniques, is covered. The results demonstrate that the model-based approach is a well suited method for engine calibration, and the integrated system provides an effective solution for implementing model-based calibration. Copyright © 2012 SAE International.


Kahlbau S.,IAV Automotive Engineering Inc. | Bestle D.,TU Brandenburg
Mechanics Based Design of Structures and Machines | Year: 2013

In general, gearshift is related to change of acceleration due to the changing gear ratio. Modern double-clutch transmissions allow for shaping the acceleration transition by controlling the torques transmitted by the clutches. Thus, the question arises about an optimal transition law for the acceleration. The paper demonstrates that jerk and change of jerk may be considered as major sources of discomfort. Thus, a bi-criterion optimization problem is formulated for finding an optimal acceleration transition and an associated shift control. The problem is solved by analytical and polynomial approaches, and a theoretically optimal solution is shown. The latter is applied to a simple simulation model of a double-clutch transmission to demonstrate its applicability. © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Al-Assadi S.,IAV Automotive Engineering Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2014

This paper presents another application [1] of using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) in adaptive tracking control of an electronic throttle system. The ANN learns to model the experimental direct inverse dynamic of the throttle servo system using a multilayer perceptron neural network structure with the dynamic back-propagation algorithm. An off-line training process was used based on an historical set of experimental measurements that covered all operating conditions. This provided sufficient information on the dynamics of the open-loop inverse nonlinear plant model. The identified ANN Direct Inverse Model (ANNDIM) was used as a feed-forward controller combined with an adaptive feed-back gains (PID) controller scheduled [2] at different operating conditions to provide the robustness in tracking control to un-modeled dynamics of the throttle servo system. The un-modeled dynamics are mainly related to the strong nonlinearity functions that may excite the system with external un-measurable disturbances and noise effects. The feed-forward ANNDIM is first used to emulate the inverse dynamics of the DC servo system. However, the variations in nonlinear dynamics of the throttle body during actual operation cause some error in the prediction of the exact inverse dynamic obtained from ANNDIM. Therefore, by adding the feed-back PID adaptive controller term in the control loop will compensate the model mismatches for these un-modeled dynamic variations and improve the overall control performance. Practical implementation results using rapid prototype real-time system testing are provided to illustrate the performance and effectiveness of the proposed method in tracking controls of multiple set-point changes at different operating conditions. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.

Loading IAV Automotive Engineering Inc. collaborators
Loading IAV Automotive Engineering Inc. collaborators