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News Article | March 11, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The exciting discovery of ancient carvings deep inside a dolmen near Kibbutz Shamir, in upper Galilee, took the archaeological world by storm as the first documentation of rock art in the Middle East. This archaeological treasure lay hidden in a tomb of massive proportions, measuring 65 feet in diameter, deep beneath 400 tons of rock. The abstract engravings - of great value because of their singularity - were found engraved on the ceiling of the tomb's central burial chamber, and were described to be "mysterious" in nature. Dating back to the so-called "Dark Ages" - the Intermediate Bronze Age in the Southern Levant - the gigantic dolmen was uncovered by Israeli archaeologists from Tel Hai College, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and the Israel Antiquities Authority. "What makes this dolmen so unique is its huge dimensions, the structure surrounding it and most importantly the artistic decorations engraved in its ceiling," said the archaeologists. The thrilling discovery, featured March 2 in the journal PLOS One, offers a rare glimpse into the lives of people who lived in that region more than 4,000 years ago. The megalithic burial mound (or tumulus) is one of the more than 400 tomb structures still remaining from the Intermediate Bronze Age but stands out through its imposing size and detail work. According to Gonen Sharon, professor of Galilee Studies at Tel-Hai College and also the archaeologist who discovered the ancient rock art, the findings near Kibbutz Shamir suggest the 4,000-year-old civilization that left them behind was more advanced than previously thought. The lack of monumental buildings and low number of settlements from this era initially led scientists to presume the people of that time were mostly nomadic. However, the scale of the newfound burial structure, as well as the attention to detail poured into its construction, point to a more elaborate type of social organization. "A complex governmental system was needed to recruit laborers for building such a monumental structure and for supplying their needs during the operation," explained Sharon. "It also needed to possess the architectural knowledge and dexterity for the complex stonemasonry involved." Upon entering the tumulus, archaeologists stumbled upon a series of burial chambers built at the corners of the structure, culminating with a central rectangular chamber, which seems to have served as a family tomb. Here they found the remains of two adults - male and female - along with a young child. Yet the central chamber had more to offer, as Sharon was elated to come upon 14 abstract engravings on the ceiling, under the massive capstone. The engraved shapes depict straight lines converging toward the center of an arc. Most of the engravings are clearly visible and seem to be abstract, but 3D scans revealed they resemble arrows or anchors. "No parallels exist for these shapes in the engraved rock drawings of the Middle East, and their significance remains a mystery," said IAA archaeologist Uri Berger. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Cultural Perspectives were delighted to be part of the audience listening to the Diversity Delivers - International Advertising Association (IAA) Thought Leadership Breakfast forum panel.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

With more than 300 VIPs in attendance and thanks to sponsors such as Moët Hennessy and Delta, this year's gala raised more money for the Jesse Owens Foundation than ever before. Proceeds raised from the gala benefit the Jesse Owens Foundation which provides future generations with resources to help develop their talents, broaden their horizons and help them become better citizens. On April 26, 2017, the Jesse Owens Foundation hosted a VIP Cocktail Reception at the New York Athletic Club to jumpstart the celebration. Guests included members of Muhammad Ali's family, Herb Douglas Jr., and Rodney Williams, CMO of Moët Hennessy. About the International Athletic Association The International Athletic Association (IAA) is a non-profit organization established to promote and to encourage universal values of fairness, integrity, uncompromising sportsmanship and excellence in athletic competition. Committed to keeping alive the spirit, heart, and qualities of world renowned US Olympian, Jesse Owens, the IAA hosts the Jesse Owens International Trophy Award Gala to support youth and aspiring Olympic athletes. The International Athletic Association (IAA) was co-founded by US Olympian Herbert Douglas Jr., to honor his friend and mentor, Jesse Owens. About the Jesse Owens Foundation  The Jesse Owens Foundation is a non-profit organization whose goal is to promote the development of youth to their fullest potential. Established in 1980 by friends and family after the untimely death of Jesse Owens, the foundation perpetuates the ideals and life's work of this Olympic champion and humanitarian. The Jesse Owens Foundation seeks to perpetuate the spirit and beliefs of Jesse Owens through its support of The Ruth and Jesse Owens Scholars Program at The Ohio State University. This program provides services to graduating high school seniors with untapped potential to develop their talents, broaden their horizons, and to help them become better citizens. Currently, The Foundation serves as a resource for information and referral on the life and legacy of Jesse Owens and provides its services on a competitive basis without regard for race, creed, color, national origin, or sex. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sports-icons-and-influencers-come-together-to-support-the-jesse-owens-foundation-300452373.html


Preparing agreement for ANSP to receive space-based ADS-B data to develop cross-regional air traffic management procedures AUCKLAND, New Zealand, Feb. 28, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airways New Zealand, New Zealand's Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP) and Aireon LLC announced today that they have signed an agreement in principle to enter into an operational validation trial. This agreement will pave the way to a formal operational validation agreement allowing for the development of operational concepts for air traffic management in South Pacific airspace and long-range flow management procedures to major New Zealand destinations. These operational concepts will be based on the use of space-based Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data to leverage the efficiency and safety benefits of a global air traffic surveillance capability. This agreement comes 20 months after the execution of a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between Aireon and Airways to execute a benefits analysis for deploying space-based ADS-B in their region. Airways also plans to use Aireon data to determine the best configuration of planned terrestrial-based ADS-B installations, augmented with space-based ADS-B, to ensure the most cost-effective use of the designated infrastructure. Airways chief operating officer Ed Sims says Airways is excited to be exploring the possibilities of this new capability. "Once we have completed the formal agreement we will, over the next three years, work with Aireon to investigate how satellite-based surveillance could enhance our air traffic management services in the South Pacific airspace. "We are looking forward to seeing how continuous monitoring via satellite could provide enhanced safety, traffic flow, and efficiency benefits to our customers." "We are very excited about the developments with Airways," said Don Thoma, chief executive officer, Aireon. "We have worked closely with Airways to determine the possible applicability of space-based ADS-B in the South Pacific." He added, "Airways is known for their strong desire to deliver value to their customers, and we look forward to taking the next step to assess the potential for deployment of space-based ADS-B in their region." Aireon's system will be operational in 2018, upon completion of the Iridium NEXT satellite constellation. The service will provide ANSPs with global air traffic surveillance and airlines with real-time flight tracking. It is expected to help reduce fuel costs, increase safety, and enable more efficient flight paths. Aireon is deploying a global, space-based Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system capable of surveilling and tracking ADS-B equipped aircraft around the globe in real-time. The system will be used to provide ADS-B coverage that will span oceanic, polar and remote regions, where current surveillance systems are limited to line-of-site and densely populated areas. Aireon will harness the best of aviation surveillance advancements already underway and extend them globally in order to significantly improve efficiency, expand safety, reduce emissions and provide cost savings to aviation stakeholders. In partnership with leading ANSPs from around the world, NAV CANADA, ENAV, the Irish Aviation Authority (IAA) and Naviair, as well as Iridium Communications, Aireon is developing an operational, global, space-based air traffic surveillance system expected to be available by 2018. For more information about Aireon, visit: www.aireon.com. Airways is a world-leading commercial Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP), and operates in New Zealand as a State-Owned Enterprise (SOE). We look after key aviation infrastructure around New Zealand and manage the more than 1 million traffic movements per year into and around New Zealand's 30 million square kilometres of airspace. Airways provides air traffic control and engineering training, and has delivered air traffic management, Flight yield revenue management solutions, navigation services and consultancy in more than 65 countries. For more information about Airways please visit www.airways.co.nz


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Preparing agreement for ANSP to receive space-based ADS-B data to develop cross-regional air traffic management procedures AUCKLAND, New Zealand, Feb. 27, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airways New Zealand, New Zealand's Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP) and Aireon LLC announced today that they have signed an agreement in principle to enter into an operational validation trial. This agreement will pave the way to a formal operational validation agreement allowing for the development of operational concepts for air traffic management in South Pacific airspace and long-range flow management procedures to major New Zealand destinations. These operational concepts will be based on the use of space-based Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data to leverage the efficiency and safety benefits of a global air traffic surveillance capability. This agreement comes 20 months after the execution of a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between Aireon and Airways to execute a benefits analysis for deploying space-based ADS-B in their region. Airways also plans to use Aireon data to determine the best configuration of planned terrestrial-based ADS-B installations, augmented with space-based ADS-B, to ensure the most cost-effective use of the designated infrastructure. Airways chief executive officer Ed Sims says Airways is excited to be exploring the possibilities of this new capability. "Once we have completed the formal agreement we will, over the next three years, work with Aireon to investigate how satellite-based surveillance could enhance our air traffic management services in the South Pacific airspace. "We are looking forward to seeing how continuous monitoring via satellite could provide enhanced safety, traffic flow, and efficiency benefits to our customers." "We are very excited about the developments with Airways," said Don Thoma, chief executive officer, Aireon. "We have worked closely with Airways to determine the possible applicability of space-based ADS-B in the South Pacific." He added, "Airways is known for their strong desire to deliver value to their customers, and we look forward to taking the next step to assess the potential for deployment of space-based ADS-B in their region." Aireon's system will be operational in 2018, upon completion of the Iridium NEXT satellite constellation. The service will provide ANSPs with global air traffic surveillance and airlines with real-time flight tracking. It is expected to help reduce fuel costs, increase safety, and enable more efficient flight paths. Aireon is deploying a global, space-based Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system capable of surveilling and tracking ADS-B equipped aircraft around the globe in real-time. The system will be used to provide ADS-B coverage that will span oceanic, polar and remote regions, where current surveillance systems are limited to line-of-site and densely populated areas. Aireon will harness the best of aviation surveillance advancements already underway and extend them globally in order to significantly improve efficiency, expand safety, reduce emissions and provide cost savings to aviation stakeholders. In partnership with leading ANSPs from around the world, NAV CANADA, ENAV, the Irish Aviation Authority (IAA) and Naviair, as well as Iridium Communications, Aireon is developing an operational, global, space-based air traffic surveillance system expected to be available by 2018. For more information about Aireon, visit: www.aireon.com. Airways is a world-leading commercial Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP), and operates in New Zealand as a State-Owned Enterprise (SOE). We look after key aviation infrastructure around New Zealand and manage the more than 1 million traffic movements per year into and around New Zealand's 30 million square kilometres of airspace. Airways provides air traffic control and engineering training, and has delivered air traffic management, Flight yield revenue management solutions, navigation services and consultancy in more than 65 countries. For more information about Airways please visit www.airways.co.nz


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

MCLEAN, Virginia, March 2, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Aireon announced today that they have formally received control from Iridium Communications Inc. (NASDAQ: IRDM) of the first Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) payload hosted on an Iridium NEXT satellite.  This is a major milestone on the path towards 100 percent global air traffic surveillance. Aireon now begins a rigorous, in-depth testing and validation process, verifying the capability of the ADS-B payloads. Known as an Initial Performance Verification (IPV), this process will last approximately two weeks before transitioning to a Detailed Performance Verification (DPV) that will focus more specifically on calibrating the payloads for optimal performance.  Procedures for the IPV were under development for over a year with valuable insight provided by Iridium, Harris Corporation, NAV CANADA and the Federal Aviation Administration. "When we first turned on the payloads after they reached orbit, we received an unexpected surprise – aircraft were immediately being seen in real-time," said Aireon CEO, Don Thoma. "We've already seen commercial aircraft, general aviation aircraft and helicopters, in oceanic and remote airspace that have never before had real-time surveillance. The real fun for us now begins as we take control and push the performance to see just what space-based ADS-B can do." In late January, the first "power-on" for the AireonSM ADS-B payload was performed to validate launch survival and run a self-diagnostic systems check.  During this systems check, Aireon did not expect to see any aircraft, however the payload antennas were active and 150 ADS-B aircraft were detected over multiple-passes with thousands of ADS-B messages received and decoded.  Among some of the firsts for the Aireon system are: "Detecting NextJet 594 was an added bonus," said Vincent Capezzuto, CTO for Aireon. "This is an early proof-point of the power of the Aireon ADS-B payload and its ability to detect aircraft close to the ground and in terminal airspace." Aireon's space-based ADS-B system will be operational in 2018, shortly after completion of the Iridium NEXT satellite constellation.  The service will provide Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs) with global air traffic surveillance and airlines with real-time flight tracking.  It is expected to help reduce fuel costs, increase safety, and enable more efficient flight paths.  The first 10 Iridium NEXT satellites carrying the Aireon hosted-payloads were launched into low-Earth-orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, on January 14, 2017.  Seven additional SpaceX launches are scheduled to take place over the next 12 to 15 months, including the second launch now targeted for mid-June 2017.  In total, the operational constellation consists of 66 satellites, while the remaining nine launched will serve as on-orbit spares. For additional information about Aireon, please visit www.aireon.com. Aireon is deploying a global, space-based Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system capable of surveilling and tracking ADS-B equipped aircraft around the globe in real-time. The system will be used to provide ADS-B coverage that will span oceanic, polar and remote regions, where current surveillance systems are limited to line-of-site and densely populated areas. Aireon will harness the best of aviation surveillance advancements already underway and extend them globally in order to significantly improve efficiency, expand safety, reduce emissions and provide cost savings to aviation stakeholders. In partnership with leading ANSPs from around the world, NAV CANADA, ENAV, the Irish Aviation Authority (IAA) and Naviair, as well as Iridium Communications, Aireon is developing an operational, global, space-based air traffic surveillance system expected to be available by 2018. For more information about Aireon, visit: www.aireon.com.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

NEW YORK, Feb. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- The International Athletic Association (IAA) today announced that iconic tennis star Serena Williams and legendary boxer Muhammad Ali are the recipients of the esteemed 2017 Jesse Owens Awards. The prestigious awards recognize sports legends who...


« New enhanced-range Volkswagen e-Golf now available for order in Europe | Main | Driving Hyundai’s electrified Ioniq line-up; cost-effective efficiency and dynamics » MAN Truck & Bus, a member of the Volkswagen Group, and the Austrian Council for Sustainable Logistics (CNL) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to enter into a development partnership on electric drive medium- and heavy-duty trucks. MAN also presented an all-electric prototype of a semitrailer tractor unit for urban distribution transport. As part of its partnership with CNL—a group of fifteen of Austria’s largest companies in the retail, logistics and production sectors—MAN will be making test vehicles available to nine CNL member companies for practical trials from the end of 2017. Further, MAN intends to begin producing electric versions of the MAN TGM series—manufactured at its Steyr, Austria site—from the end of 2018. CNL plans to up its use of eTrucks for inner-city and suburban distribution transport from 2020 onwards in order to make an active contribution towards reducing emissions in cities. Test vehicles will start to be used at nine CNL partners—Gebrüder Weiss, Hofer, Magna Steyr, METRO, Quehenberger, REWE, Schachinger, SPAR and Stiegl—in November 2017. MAN Truck & Bus already presented the MAN Metropolis concept vehicle in 2012. The all-electric 26-tonne refuse collector vehicle, with its very low noise levels, is suited for night-shift applications in city centers. A range extender in the chassis increases its deployable range to a maximum of 150 km/day. Since then, numerous practical tests with the vehicle have provided valuable experience for future projects. The Metropolis received positive feedback from the testers for its simple operation and driveability. In practice, it proved to be a versatile vehicle suitable for many different applications. Fuel savings compared with a conventional diesel-powered vehicle were around 80% with the range extender. MAN Truck & Bus presented a further development of the Metropolis concept at the IAA 2016. This time, it was a purely electrically powered semitrailer tractor for applications in night-shift deliveries to city center locations such as those normally utilized today by food supermarkets. Technically, it is based on a TGS 4X2 BLS-TS semitrailer tractor with an 18t permissible total weight. MAN initially used a driving demonstration to present the concept study as part of their presentation of the development partnership with CNL in Steyr. Optimized for use with uniaxial or biaxial city semitrailers, the concept vehicle fulfills the main demands being placed on future delivery vehicles for city center applications—have a high load volume and low unladen weight, be emission-free (CO , NO ) and very quiet in motion, and also guarantee good maneuverability. The MAN City-Truck concept vehicle is powered by a 250 kW electric motor which delivers its 2700 N·m of torque to the rear axle via a propshaft, with no gearbox. Auxiliary units, such as the power steering, air compressor and the air-conditioning system, are electrically operated and controlled via the energy management system, thereby ensuring energy savings. The braking energy recovery system converts the kinetic energy of the vehicle into electrical energy during acceleration phases, and feeds it back into the battery. A display in the cockpit informs the driver about the current battery charge level. The energy for the truck is provided by high-performance lithium-ion batteries from the Volkswagen Group, which are arranged under the driver’s cab above the front axle, where standard vehicles have their diesel engine. The additional weight of the electric drive components is compensated for by dispensing with the conventional diesel engine, with the result that the vehicle has the same payload as a similar, conventional semitrailer tractor from the TGS model range. The batteries are normally charged overnight. At the same time, the system is also designed for opportunity charging. The concept vehicle also has the technical infrastructure to allow additional batteries to be installed on the side of the frame. With maximum battery charge, and depending on how it is used, the semitrailer combination concept vehicle can travel up to 200 kilometers daily. The electric truck study, presented within the framework of the agreement with CNL, forms the basic technical design for the development of vehicles that will undergo practical tests in nine CNL partner companies from the end of 2017. This will involve vehicles based on the MAN TGM series, primarily 6x2 chassis featuring refrigerated truck bodies, swap containers and drinks containers. A semitrailer combination also forms part of the scope of testing. The results from the practical tests with the test vehicles will help MAN to develop a series product portfolio of electrically driven trucks in future. This represents just one aspect of the e-mobility strategy from MAN Truck & Bus for inner-city transport solutions, which are due to be part of the company’s product range as of 2021. As part of its e-mobility roadmap, MAN is initially planning to unveil a pre-production bus version of a battery-electric vehicle (BEV) to the public by 2018. Series production of a 100% electrically powered city bus is due to start at the end of 2019. The technological know-how about the e-mobility assembly that has been gained in respect of buses will also be available for use in the eTruck. Regarding eTrucks, the first small-series production is due to start at the Steyr site at the end of 2018, following on from the practical tests by CNL companies that will be starting at the end of 2017. Series production of eTrucks will start in early 2021. When it comes to its e-mobility strategy, membership in the Volkswagen Group means that MAN is able to utilise synergies within the Group and profit from the dynamics of the passenger car sector.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Additional Key Senior Leadership Appointments and Changes Also Announced WESTCHESTER, Ill., Feb. 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Insurance Auto Auctions, Inc. (IAA), today announced that Tim O'Day has been named the company's chief operating officer, reporting to IAA CEO and President, John K...


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

In 1990, the International Academy of Astronautics published a special issue of their journal , Acta Astronautica, dedicated to the problem of what to do in the event that the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) detected an alien signal. These "post-detection protocols" as outlined in the IAA's Declaration of Principles in 1989 were inspired by increasingly rapid technological advances in the SETI field that made the likelihood of detecting a signal more likely than at any other point in the search's 30 year history. But the one technological development that its collaborators couldn't have anticipated was the rise of social media, which could seriously complicate the ability of government and private research institutions to control the social consequences resulting from the detection of an extraterrestrial message. "The IAA declaration of principles was based on using traditional forms of media, print, radio, TV, " Les Tennen, a space lawyer from Phoenix and member of the IAA's SETI Committee, told me. "Now we've got instantaneous communication where your phone will notify you of something important is happening, you don't even have to go looking for it. Millions, if not billions of people could be informed [of a potential ET signal] almost instantaneously." As detailed in the text of the original 1990 post-detection protocol, in the aftermath of the detection of a possible alien signal, the institution or individual responsible for the discovery should seek to verify that the signal is indeed artificial and extraterrestrial in origin before making any sort of public announcement. Moreover, before informing the public about the signal, the institution that discovered the signal should first inform other relevant institutions and government actors about the signal so that its veracity can be independently verified. If it turns out that the signal is indeed from aliens, the discovery can be made public via the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (a news service run by the International Astronomical Union) and the discoverer should inform the Secretary General of the United Nations. Indeed, the legal strength of the post-detection protocol rests on the authority of Article XI of the UN Treaty on governing the exploration and use of outer space, which requires that countries "inform the secretary general of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community…of the nature, conduct, locations and results" of the results of space science. Read More: An Astrolinguist Explains How to Talk to Aliens Ultimately, these protocols were designed as a sort of damage control, both to limit the spread of false positives as well as public hysteria. As detailed in the report from a workshop conducted by NASA following the launch of the High Resolution Microwave Survey in 1993 (the most powerful SETI search ever conducted at that point), "reactions to a detection can range from indifference…through millennial enthusiasm or catastrophist anxiety, to full scale paranoia…a few reactions would probably be irrationally extreme or even violent." NASA identified education as the most prominent factor in limiting the negative impacts of detecting an alien signal. In the days before the World Wide Web had risen to prominence, and long before the advent of social media platforms like Facebook or Twitter, limiting false information (which could trigger public panic) was far simpler. All news would be channeled through a handful of official agencies, and only after rigorous peer review and analysis. Yet in the age of social media, rampant fake news, and Wikileaks, it's hard to imagine that news as big as the detection of the first message from an extraterrestrial civilization would be kept under wraps for long. This is problematic for a number of reasons. Not only could it spark public hysteria, but it could also lead toward government infighting like seen in Arrival or attempts to send a reply to aliens without a global consensus on what to say, or whether a message should be sent at all. The IAA post-detection protocol prohibits sending a response to ET without global consensus on the content of the message, and for that matter, SETI scientists are fiercely divided on whether sending a message to aliens is a smart move. For now, Tennen is focused on developing ideas that would update the IAA post-detection protocol for our connected world. Some of his suggestions include updating the declaration so that it enables a strict confidentiality among researchers involved in verifying that a received signal is extraterrestrial in origin, as well as establishing a central organization that would be responsible for managing all communications to the public related to the detection of a signal. Interestingly, some form of these protocols were included in the original 1989 Declaration of Principles, but were omitted from the 2010 revision. For example, the 1989 declaration said that the world should be informed of the signal through the International Astronaomical Union's Central Bureau of Astronomical Telegrams. On the other hand, the 2010 revision also established a Post-Detection Task Group under the IAA SETI committee, which would be responsible for dealing with "matters that may arise in the event of a confirmed signal." At last year's International Astronautical Congress in Mexico, Tennnen gave a presentation on the problems social media poses to the post-detection protocol and some of his proposed solutions. Tennen said he got a positive response from the members of the IAA SETI committee in the audience, who agreed that it was time to start seriously considering how to update the post-detection protocols. "The danger if this isn't updated is [in the event of a signal detection] the declaration will be disregarded because it will be obsolete," said Tennen. "There is not going to be time to have the kind of discussions and deliberations that the original protocols were envisioning." Get six of our favorite Motherboard stories every day by signing up for our newsletter .

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