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Xue F.,Amgen Inc. | Strombom I.,Lilly Corporate Center | Turnbull B.,Ingenix I3 Drug Safety | Zhu S.,Ingenix I3 Drug Safety | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular events are inconclusively associated with duloxetine use in clinical trials and spontaneous reports. This analysis of cardiovascular events in relation to duloxetine use within a large health insurance database provides further data on the association. METHODS: This cohort study was conducted within a population with commercial health insurance. Adults with depression who initiated duloxetine were matched to separate cohorts of initiators of venlafaxine, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), along with untreated patients with depression, and enrollees without depression. The cohorts were followed for cardiovascular events (acute myocardial infarction, sudden death, hypertensive crisis, arrhythmia, and coronary revascularization), which were identified through health insurance claims and confirmed upon review of underlying medical records. Proportional hazards and Poisson regression models were used for comparisons. RESULTS: There were approximately 64,000 person-years of follow-up among all cohorts (including 17,386 person-years among 21,457 duloxetine initiators), yielding 279 cardiovascular events. Relative to duloxetine initiators, those without depression had lower rates of combined events (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.32-0.81) and coronary revascularizations (IRR, 0.51; 95% CI 0.29-0.89). The IR of each of the cardiovascular outcomes did not differ across the other cohorts, even accounting for time since last duloxetine dispensing. CONCLUSION: The incidence of cardiovascular events did not differ among duloxetine initiators relative to other antidepressant comparators or those with untreated depression but was higher than those without depression, suggesting that depression itself (or associated morbidities) may affect the risk of cardiovascular events.© 2012 by Lippincot t Williams & Wilkins. Source


Xue F.,Amgen Inc. | Strombom I.,Lilly Corporate Center | Turnbull B.,Ingenix I3 Drug Safety | Zhu S.,Ingenix I3 Drug Safety | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology | Year: 2011

Elevated hepatic enzyme levels and hepatic injuries have been associated with duloxetine use in clinical trials and spontaneous reports, but the association of duloxetine with a broad spectrum of hepatic outcomes has not been assessed observationally.This cohort study of adult duloxetine initiators between 2004 and 2006 based on the Ingenix Research Data Mart involved 6 matched comparator cohorts, including 4 antidepressant initiator groups (venlafaxine, nefazodone, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants), depressed but untreated patients, and individuals without depression. The cohorts were followed up for hepatic events, and proportional hazards regression compared duloxetine initiators with comparator cohorts, whereas Poisson regression compared duloxetine usage categories to account for changed therapy during follow-up.Approximately 64,000 person-years among 21,457 duloxetine initiators and comparator cohorts yielded 51 hepatic outcome events. Venlafaxine initiators (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12-0.95) and the cohort without depression (IRR = 0.30; 95% CI, 0.10-0.93) had lower incidences of combined hepatic events than duloxetine initiators, whereas no other differences in hepatic events were observed for duloxetine initiators relative to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, and untreated depressed patients. In as-treated analyses, relative to nonuse, current (IRR = 4.30; 95% CI, 1.45-12.81) and recent (IRR = 5.93; 95% CI, 1.63-21.55) duloxetine use was associated with greater incidence of less severe hepatic outcomes but not hepatic-related death and potential acute hepatic failure.Although duloxetine does not seem to increase the risk of hepatic-related death or acute hepatic failure, it may be associated with an increased risk of certain less severe hepatic events. © 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Source

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