Hyundai America Technical Center

Sun City Center, United States

Hyundai America Technical Center

Sun City Center, United States

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Ademuwagun A.,Hyundai Kia America Technical Center Inc. | Myers J.,Hyundai America Technical Center
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2014

Coconut shell and torrefied wood are bio-sourced and renewable materials that can be used as fillers in various polymer matrices. Torrefied wood material can be produced from numerous cellulose based materials, such as wood, sunflower hulls, flax shive, hemp and oat hulls. These bio-fillers would replace talc and glass bubbles which are not a renewable resource. Additionally, the implementation of torrefied wood and coconut would reduce the carbon footprint and improve sustainability of Hyundai and Kia vehicles, improving customer perception of our product line. In this study, coconut and torrefied wood filled polypropylene properties are tested for a HVAC Case application. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.


Alirezaee S.,University of Windsor | Ahmadi M.,University of Windsor | Erfani S.,University of Windsor | Akbari S.,Razi University | And 2 more authors.
Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Computer and Knowledge Engineering, ICCKE 2014 | Year: 2014

Many routing strategies have been proposed to reduce the implementation complexity of multihop sensor networks. Specifically, a combination of routing scheme and cooperative variety by considering a realistic channel model is considered and the energy constraints is applied to the existing routing strategies. The proposed strategy, by considering energy parameters, balances energy consumption among relays considerably. Simulation results indicate that the End-to-End outage of presented energy balancing method is less than the ad-hoc approach and the useful lifetime of the network significantly increases. © 2014 IEEE.


Lim C.-S.,Hyundai Motor Company | Han E.,Hyundai Motor Company | Apelian C.,Hyundai America Technical Center | Bogema D.,Brüel and Kjær Vibro
SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Mechanical Systems | Year: 2014

A new approach to achieve better customer perception of overall vehicle quietness is the sound balance improvement of vehicle interior sound during driving. Interior sound is classified into 3 primary sound source shares such as engine sound relative to revolution speed, tire road noise and wind noise relative to vehicle speed. Each interior sound shares are classified using the synchronous time-domain averaging method. The sound related to revolution order of engine and auxiliaries is considered as engine sound share, tire road noise and wind noise shares are extracted by multiple coherent output power analysis. Sound balance analysis focuses on improving the relative difference in interior sound share level between the 3 primary sound sources. Virtual sound simulator which is able to represent various driving conditions and able to adjust imaginary sound share is built for several vehicles in same compact segment. Objective sound evaluation targeting the North American customer is carried out using the virtual sound simulator tool in audio lab and it is verified that overall customer perception is improved by modification of sound balance between 3 primary sound shares. Through objective evaluation for the North American customer, the effectiveness of each sound source to each driving condition and customer perception of overall quietness and preference was found. In this paper the development guideline for interior for the North American market is suggested as well as effective countermeasures for improving sound balance. © 2014 SAE International.


Janca S.,Kettering University | Shanks K.,Hyundai America Technical Center | Brelin-Fornari J.,Kettering University | Tangirala R.,Hyundai America Technical Center | Tavakoli M.,Kettering University
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2014

A near-side, rear seat side impact component test, was conducted and validated utilizing a SIDIIs anthropomorphic test device (ATD). The test fixture consisted of the rear seat structure, side door, interior trim, and side airbag curtain module. Test parameters were determined from full scale tests including impact speed, angle of impact, and depth of door intrusion. A comparative assessment was conducted between the full scale test and the deceleration sled test including ATD contact with the vehicle interior, contact duration, sequential timing of ATD contact, and dummy injury measures. Validation was achieved so that the deceleration sled test procedure could be utilized for further evaluations. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.


Kim T.,University of Virginia | Kerrigan J.,University of Virginia | Bollapragada V.,University of Virginia | Crandall J.,University of Virginia | And 2 more authors.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2014

Some rollover test methods, which impose a touchdown condition on a test vehicle, have been developed to study vehicle crashworthiness and occupant protection in rollover crashes. In ground-tripped rollover crashes, speed, steering maneuver, braking, vehicle inertial and geometric properties, topographical and road design characteristics, and soil type can all affect vehicle touchdown conditions. It is presumed that while there may be numerous possible combinations of kinematic metrics (velocity components and orientation) at touchdown, there are also numerous combinations of metrics that are not likely to occur in rollover crashes. To determine a realistic set of touchdown conditions to be used in a vehicle rollover crash test, a lateral deceleration sled-based non-destructive rollover initiation test system (RITS) with a fully programmable deceleration pulse is in development. A full-size SUV vehicle dynamics model was developed and validated with static test data and curb-trip rollover test data. Then, design constraints of the RITS were set considering available space and given range of vehicle mass and geometric properties. Since accelerating a test vehicle consumes the limited travel distance, the effect of the initial lateral speed of a test vehicle on the touchdown condition was evaluated to justify the use of minimum initial speed. Next, a functional form of a lateral deceleration pulse was defined based on a soil-trip rollover crash results from literature. Lastly, Monte Carlo simulations were performed by varying the deceleration pulse to examine the ranges of touchdown conditions that can be produced by RITS system. Other than its touchdown translational speed, there was no effect of initial vehicle velocity on the touchdown conditions. This indicates that RITS tests can be performed at lower initial velocities while still predicting touchdown conditions relevant to higher velocity rollovers. This study suggest that the RITS can produce a wide range of touchdown conditions, which were comparable to the results from research. Vehicle energy at touchdown increased as the magnitude of the deceleration pulse increased. Also, the results of this study gave insights in determining the test input conditions of the RITS by suggesting quantitative values for the change of the sled speed, tripping time, and initial deceleration value of the sled speed. To use RITS to identify field-relevant touchdown conditions, further investigation on deceleration pulses that occur to vehicles in rollover crashes is required. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.


Tahmasbi-Sarvestani A.,West Virginia University | Kazemi H.,West Virginia University | Fallah Y.P.,West Virginia University | Naserian M.,Hyundai America Technical Center | Lewis A.,Hyundai America Technical Center
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2015

Pedestrians account for a significant ratio of traffic fatalities; as a result, research on methods of reducing vehicle-pedestrian crashes is of importance. In this paper, we describe a system architecture that allows the use of vehicle-to-pedestrian (V2P) communication as a means of generating situational awareness and eventually predicting hazards and warning drivers and pedestrians. In contrast, vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication for safety applications, V2P has not received much attention. One major reason for this lack of attention had been the unavailability of communication mechanisms between pedestrians and vehicles. Recent advances in enabling Wi-Fi and dedicated short range communication (DSRC) based communication using smart-phones is changing this picture. As a result, V2P communication can be considered as a possible solution. In this paper, we first investigate the feasibility of V2P crash avoidance applications, considering the fact that pedestrian movement dynamics, response times, and crash scenarios are different from V2V scenarios. We then propose an architecture for V2P crash avoidance systems. The architecture has vehicle side and pedestrian side applications. Each of them communicates its current state information such as position and time to the other device. Using this information, crash threats can be predicted and an advisory or imminent collision warning will be generated. Finally, we demonstrate and evaluate a developed V2P crash avoidance system based on this architecture. Copyright © 2015 SAE International.


Furse D.,Hyundai America Technical Center | Park S.,Hyundai America Technical Center | Foster L.,Hyundai America Technical Center | Kim S.,Hyundai Motor Company
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2014

An innovative system has been developed to remotely monitor and record customer usage patterns of the Hyundai Genesis HVAC system in real time by smartphone. The data monitored includes dozens of HVAC-related parameters, including driver and passenger set temperature, blower setting, mode and intake position, internal software parameters, etc. This information and understanding of real-world usage of American customers enables design and test engineers to better satisfy customer demands for automatic temperature control performance. This study identifies areas in need of improvement Preliminary findings of this study suggest that auto mode usage is highest in mild temperatures and lowest in hot soaking conditions. In hot soak conditions (above 35C cabin temperature), the majority of American customers manually control the temperature and blower speed. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.


Lewis A.,Hyundai America Technical Center | Naserian M.,Hyundai America Technical Center
SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Electronic and Electrical Systems | Year: 2015

Pedestrians A method of locating a charging target device (vehicle) in a parking lot scenario by the evaluation of Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) of the Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) signal and Global Positioning System (GPS) data is proposed in this paper. A metric call Location Image (LI) is defined based on the RSSI received from each charger and the physical location of the parking associated to that charger. The central parking lot processor logs the GPS coordinates and LI received from the vehicle. Each pairing attempt by a vehicle loads a new LI into the central processor's database. Utilizing the LI and the proposed methods the vehicle will achieve expedited charger to system pairing while in the company of multiple chargers. Copyright © 2015 SAE International.


Elliott E.S.,Hyundai America Technical Center | Roche C.,Hyundai America Technical Center | Reddy J.,Hyundai America Technical Center
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2016

Since the inception of the IIHS Small Overlap Impact (SOI) test in 2012, automotive manufacturers have implemented many solutions in the vehicle body structure to achieve an IIHS "Good" rating. There are two main areas of the vehicle: forward of vehicle cockpit and immediately surrounding the vehicle cockpit, which typically work together for SOI to mitigate crash energy and prevent intrusion into the passenger zones. The structures forward of vehicle cockpit are designed to either 1) absorb vehicle energy from impact to the barrier, or 2) provide enough strength and rigidity to aid deflection of the vehicle away from the barrier. The structures which are immediately surrounding the vehicle cockpit (known as pillars and rocker/sills) are traditionally components designed to be highly rigid sheet metal panels to protect the occupant during crash events. This paper focuses on a concept for a portion of the cockpit structure that combines energy absorption and high rigidity structure, which are not typical in this area of a vehicle's architecture. Using CAE methods, it is observed that a vehicle's SOI structural rating will be enhanced utilizing the presented concept. © 2016 SAE International.


Ademuwagun A.,Hyundai America Technical Center | Myers J.,Hyundai America Technical Center
Annual Technical Conference - ANTEC, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2014

Coconut shell and torrefied wood are bio-sourced and renewable materials that can be used as fillers in various polymer matrices. Torrefied wood material can be produced from numerous cellulose based materials, such as wood, sunflower hulls, flax shive, hemp and oat hulls. These biofillers would replace talc and glass bubbles which are not a renewable resource. Additionally, the implementation of torrefied wood and coconut would reduce the carbon footprint and improve sustainability of Hyundai and Kia vehicles, improving customer perception of our product line. In this study, coconut and torrefied wood filled polypropylene properties are tested for a HVAC Case application. Copyright © (2014) by the Society of Plastics Engineers.

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