Westlake Village, CA, United States
Westlake Village, CA, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Patent
HyPerComp, Inc. | Date: 2015-06-01

A pressure vessel includes a polymeric liner defining a fluid containment cavity and having an opening defining a port aperture extending between an inner surface and an outer surface of the polymeric liner and a rigid ring element is embedded within the polymeric liner and surrounding the port aperture. A metallic port element is disposed on the outer surface of the polymeric liner and fixed to the rigid ring element. A fiber composite material is disposed about the outer surface of the polymeric liner.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.97K | Year: 2015

A new analysis and design tool for multiple antennas sited on a large platform is proposed, based on exact physics solutions of the 3-D Maxwells equations in the frequency domain. This tool uses the recently developed ultra-weak variational formulation (UWVF) to obtain equations for the tangential fields in a form that can be solved iteratively with almost perfect scalability on massively parallel computers, which will permit efficient solution for 1000  platforms. HyPerComp is well positioned to develop this tool due to equivalence of the UWVF to DG Galerkin formulation which we have applied to many large antenna/structure problems. HyPerComp is teaming with Professor Peter Monk from the University of Delaware, Professor Tim Warburton of Rice University, and Professor Tomi Huttunen of the University of Kuopio, Finland, in the development, implementation and validation of the UWVF code.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.98K | Year: 2015

Liquid metal flows in the presence of a strong magnetic field (MHD flows) and associated heat and mass transfer represent a highly multi-physical problem whose solution is vital to US interests in liquid breeder blankets. Current modeling tools are limited to single rather than multiple effects, relatively low flow parameters, and/or simplified geometries. Databases to assist blanket design are incomplete or unavailable. There is an imminent need for more comprehensive physical treatment, reliable software solutions and for scientific and engineering analysis to improve the existing lead blanket concepts. We are developing a comprehensive predictive capability tool suitable for diverse liquid metal blanket applications, including: (a) high-performance computational tools based on multiple physical models, (b) scientific and engineering analysis of the important physical processes, which have not been addressed before, and (c) development of a design-oriented database for MHD flows. Two MHD codes (finite-difference and finite-volume), both based on a novel approach that utilizes the induced magnetic field as the main electromagnetic variable, have been developed in Phase I and successfully tested. The new software has shown great promise in solving the class of unsteady, finite magnetic Reynolds number MHD problems, which cannot be solved with most existing codes. In Phase II we will advance and mature the induced field solver development started in phase-I, and integrate it in a suite of codes which address a wide range of MHD flows, heat and mass transfer of fusion interest. Graphical user interfaces will be provided, transient phenomena caused by plasma disruptions will be studied, and a design database for MHD pressure drop will be developed. This project deals with the flow of liquid metals under extreme electromagnetic interactions and thermal exposure. Efficient software systems developed for this purpose will have immediate relevance to metallurgical processing of steel and aluminum and liquid fuel flows in advanced aerospace engines. We plan on integrating this development with other activities at HyPerComp in electromagnetic processing of materials and electromagnetic flow control, leading to an attractive software solution for a broad range of potential users, in semiconductor and glass manufacturing as well as other endeavors.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 375.00K | Year: 2013

Recent times have witnessed enormous advances in high fidelity modeling of electromagnetic (EM) phenomena in the time-domain. To make such simulations tractable, the computational region must be truncated in a manner allowing outgoing waves to leave with minimal reflection from the boundary. HyPerComp Inc., in collaboration with Prof. Thomas Hagstrom of the Southern Methodist University (Dallas, TX) have been investigating a boundary condition procedure named Complete Radiation Boundary Condition (CRBC) for advanced EM simulation systems. The CRBC requires no tuning parameters to achieve optimal performance for a specified level of accuracy. In Phase I a preliminary demonstration of the CRBC approach was performed on unstructured mesh systems and some important estimates of accuracy and stability have been verified in conjunction with a high order accurate EM solver which uses the discontinuous Galerkin method. Proposed Phase II development aims to generalize the formulation to a variety of discretization procedures and high performance computing platforms. We wish to develop this into an open source boundary condition module named HDcrbc which can interface with EM solvers often used in the community to deliver any specified accuracy efficiently, without the need for tuning parameters, both of which are highly desirable attributes in EM simulations.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 996.35K | Year: 2014

ABSTRACT: In this project we seek to transition major recent developments in the mathematics of model reduction to industrial grade computing applications in liquid rocket combustion instability. From the mathematical side, we are interested in unsteady nonlinear dynamical systems which exhibit limit-cycle behavior and large oscillations and potentially discontinuous solutions. From the applications perspective, we are interested in a practical simulation capability for large multi-injector liquid hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines such as the Hydrocarbon Boost demonstration (HCB) engine that are of contemporary interest. Combustion instability is a key concern in new rocket development efforts. Predictive computer modeling can serve a vital role in risk reduction at a relatively low cost. Present day simulation tools, while trending towards a comprehensive self-consistent physical model set and becoming increasingly better verified and validated, still place enormous demands on computer resources needed for realistic simulations. A software suite named HDrbm developed here will address black-box capabilities in model reduction for nonlinear multiphysical applications. HyPerComp will team with the Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute at the University of Utah in developing mathematical methods and software system in this project. The team will also benefit from consulting support from key researchers in applied mathematics and turbulent combustion modeling. BENEFIT: This work has direct relevance to major ongoing liquid rocket engine programs where stability studies are overwhelmed by the computational problem size, and can benefit from improvements in methodology. The models and methodologies developed here are also directly relevant to solid propellant rockets and gas turbine combustors. The general scope of the methods developed here is indeed rather vast. The reduced basis method has applications in numerous markets: automotive, nuclear, image processing, and atmospheric science to name a few. Successful phase-II research automatically enables control algorithms, optimization and uncertainty based predictions for combustion dynamics.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 374.99K | Year: 2014

In this STTR project we aim to build software interfaces and enhancements to existing parallel mesh adaptation libraries for applications in high performance flow modeling. In Phase-I we demonstrated a preliminary implementation of such a system and identified technology needs. Phase-II development will include both open source, as well as commercially supported mesh adaptation software and interfaces. Tools will be provided for generating an initial mesh defined by CAD models as well as discretely specified pointwise/surface mesh based data. Highlights of this software will include mesh movement, handling curved geometry, very large scale parallelization, and appropriate mathematical machinery for high order data interpolation, mass and momentum conservation and error estimation in the adapted mesh. We will focus on the mesh generation and adaptation needs of the US Army PROTEUS simulation system in implicit free surface capture (using the level set method). The tools developed, however, will be more generally applicable. The team includes HyPerComp Inc., the Scientific Computation Research Center (SCOREC) at RPI and Simmetrix Inc., comprising of researchers with a long record of contributions in scientific computing and mesh generation.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.99K | Year: 2013

The physics-based scattering phenomena from MDA objects of interest can be very complex and occur in many different forms such as: specular reflection, creeping waves, traveling waves, slow moving surface waves, edge diffraction, singular currents at surface discontinuities, resonating gaps and cavities, and general material response. While in vacuum Maxwell"s equations representing the coupling between electric and magnetic fields are linear, it is still a formidable challenge to be able to accurately simulate the various scattering phenomena. The scope of this proposed Phase II effort is to exploit the research initiatives undertaken by HyPerComp in the Phase I contract HQ0147-12-C-7921 to significantly advance the state of the art and practice in physics-based radar signature prediction methods for MDA objects of interest. The intent is to further develop, implement, validate and disseminate some of the emerging revolutionary and novel technologies in reduced order-basis methods (RBM), uncertainty estimations for signature sensitivity arising from object variability and input field parameters, and high-order algorithms that are well suited for high performance GPU parallel computing. The goal is to achieve significant reduction in computational run times from the current state of practice to perform accurate physics-based full-wave broadband solutions for complex MDA objects of interest at the end of this proposed two year Phase II effort.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.13M | Year: 2014

We propose to design, fabricate and test turbine blade configurations in a flow driven by a continuous detonation wave engine with a goal of understanding the physics and efficiency of such an integrated device. Analysis based on CFD models and cycle perf


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.99K | Year: 2014

In this proposal, a team comprising of HyPerComp and Aerojet-Rocketdyne shall create a computational system for the detailed modeling of the interaction of the human body with blast waves. The model will be able to address complex geometry and physics of the blast scene, as well as anatomical detail of the human body with adequate resolution. Nonlinear equations of state, adapted to individual tissues in the body shall be used in modeling the propagation of waves. Numerical techniques proposed here have been tested extensively in aerodynamics and propulsion applications in modeling multiphase and multi-material physics. The simulation suite shall comprise of human body models (with CAD/voxel import), graphical and interactive systems for simulation setup, automatic mesh generation, high performance computing and post-processing utilities. As this work progresses, additional capabilities to articulate the human body model and perform detailed (biologically relevant) flow-structure interaction shall be included in the system. Some innovations in performing broad parametric studies based on recent advances in reduced basis methods are proposed. It is believed that these methods can relieve some of the tedium involved in large scale computations involving multiple phenomena and physical inputs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.99K | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT: We propose here a robust production-level high-order mesh generation software for complex geometries. High order accurate numerical methods are becoming increasingly popular in the present time and have demonstrated a great measure of success in efficient error-controlled simulations for a wide variety of important problems. A curved geometry and mesh generation system is essential in maintaining the accuracy of these methods, as has been amply demonstrated in the literature. The generation of such meshes is far from the standard practice at the present time, and there is a notable absence of commercial-grade tools to generate, use and visualize them. The proposed software will be based on a firm foundation in geometry, CAD modeling and high order accurate simulations. The proposing team consists of researchers from HyPerComp and the University of Michigan with extensive experience in these areas. The primary goal will be to generate high quality hybrid curved meshes to support fluid mechanics and electromagnetics simulations where linear element meshes are conventionally used. In order to enhance the applicability of this technology, output-based methods will be developed for optimal node placement and adaptive meshing. The software will be transitioned for use in the discontinuous Galerkin based solvers HDphysics (HyPerComp) and XFLOW (U.Michigan). BENEFIT: The proposed work will facilitate the usage of high order accurate simulations in CFD and allied fields in practical applications and a wider range of potential users. Such simulations will be a revolutionary departure from customary methods used in commercial software which bear all the limitations of their legacy when aspiring to solve vastly larger and more complex problems. We believe that a successful implementation of the goals of this research will make a highly desirable product, as well as an invaluable research tool in many markets: bio-medical, aerospace, chemical and so forth.

Loading HyPerComp, Inc. collaborators
Loading HyPerComp, Inc. collaborators