Hyogo University of Teacher Education

www.hyogo-u.ac.jp
Kato, Japan

Hyogo University of Teacher Education is a national university in Katō, Hyōgo, Japan, founded as "New Concept University" of Teacher Education for Undergraduate and Graduate in 1978.There is a satellite campus in Kobe, for Graduate School in 2000. Wikipedia.

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Masumoto J.,Hyogo University of Teacher Education | Inui N.,Naruto University of Education
Experimental Brain Research | Year: 2013

Recent studies using bimanual force production have examined how factors influence redundancy in the nervous system. The present study examined effects of different movement durations on bimanual force control strategies. Ten healthy male participants produced periodic isometric forces such that the sum of two finger forces was a target cycling between 5 and 10 % of maximum voluntary contraction during five movement durations (500, 750, 1,000, 1,250, and 1,500 ms). Correlations between the two finger forces changed from positive to negative with an increase in duration. The polynomial regression analysis indicates that while the correlations between two finger forces were most negative at the target duration of 1,250 ms, they became more positive as the durations deviated from 1,250 ms. Similarly, while force variability was smallest at the target duration of 1,250 ms, it increased as the durations deviated from 1,250 ms. These findings suggested that while the duration of 1,250 ms might be a natural frequency of both fingers, bimanual force strategies changed from force error compensation to force coupling as the durations deviated from 1,250 ms. In addition, while the variance in the sum of two finger forces (the task-relevant variance) decreased with movement duration, the difference between both the finger forces (the task-irrelevant variance) did not change with the duration. Thus, a decrease in the task-relevant variance with movement duration resulted in the negative correlation between the two finger forces and the small force variability. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Inui N.,Naruto University of Education | Masumoto J.,Hyogo University of Teacher Education | Ueda Y.,Naruto University of Education | Ide K.,Naruto University of Education
Experimental Brain Research | Year: 2012

Our previous study showed that a fully flexed or extended hand became perceived as an extended or flexed 'phantom' hand as ischemic anesthesia progressed (Inui et al. in J Physiol 589:5775-5784, 2011). Here, we examined what happened if the hand was held in the midposition before and during the anesthesia. Twenty healthy participants reported the perceived postures of their right wrist and elbow during an ischemic block of the right upper arm using the left hand and arm. If the actual arm and hand were fully extended, then the perceived position of the elbow and wrist moved toward flexion. Conversely, if they were fully flexed, then the perceived position of the joints moved toward extension. However, when the hand was held in the midposition before and during the anesthesia, the position of the wrist was perceived to be in the same position. Hence, the fully flexed or extended position of a limb was essential for systematic changes in the perceived posture of the limb during the anesthesia. Because the start of these changes occurred as somatosensory inputs were declining, the changes depended on the fading inputs from strongly stretched muscle and skin during the anesthesia. © Springer-Verlag 2012.


Inui N.,Naruto University of Education | Masumoto J.,Hyogo University of Teacher Education
Experimental Brain Research | Year: 2013

Our previous studies showed that a fully extended finger, wrist, and elbow became a flexed phantom hand and arm with ischemic anesthesia, and vice versa (Inui et al. in J Physiol 589:5775-5784, 2011, Exp Brain Res 221:369-375, 2012a, Exp Brain Res 218:487-494, 2012b). It was anticipated that if the ankle and knee were fixed in full extension or flexion before and during ischemic anesthesia, the perceived positions would move in the opposite direction. The present study examined what happened when participants looked at their fixed foot and leg at the end of the anesthesia. Using the left ankle and knee, ten healthy participants demonstrated the perceived postures of the right joints during an ischemic block of the right thigh (40 min) and after they looked at the right joints at the end of the block. When the right ankle and knee were fully extended before and during the block, the final joints were perceived as flexed by all participants, and vice versa. Although there was no significant difference between joints for the magnitude of the perceived changes in flexion, the magnitude in the knee was larger than that in the ankle in extension. At the end of the experiment, when participants were allowed to see their foot, its perceived position reverted to that indicated by them earlier, during the first 25 min of cuff inflation. This new finding suggests that the position of limbs is coded by visual input more dominantly than by proprioceptive input in the brain. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Kito H.,Hyogo University of Teacher Education
Yakugaku Zasshi | Year: 2013

To promote the education on medicines in school, guidance is, as a rule, to be given in the health education of the Subject, "Health and Physical Education" indicated as a curriculum standard in lower and upper secondary school, and in the health guidance, which carry out in Special Activities and Integrated Studies, etc. Guidance is mainly carried by the teacher for health and physical in health education and school nurse teacher (yogo teacher) in health guidance. In health education we have only limited school hours, and generally use the text book. Some teachers feel resistance to teach medicines because of needs on the special knowledge, however teachers should deal with medicines based on curriculum standard. School pharmacist is a member of school, and has a special knowledge for medicines, and he/she can support teachers as a provider of teaching materials, an adviser, and for a guest teacher. It is important for school pharmacist to understand the contents indicated in curriculum standard and to use glossary to be able to understand for children. In the guidance of health, it is not necessary to teach based on curriculum standard, and it can deal with advanced contents on medicines. However it is important to understand for children what are appropriate contents according to the development stage. To use the packages and instructions for medicines provided at home are good materials for children to have interest the medicines in their guidance. The objectives of education on medicines enable children to cultivate practical abilities for the maintenance and improvement of health. © 2013 The Pharmaceutical Society of Japan.


Masumoto J.,Hyogo University of Teacher Education | Inui N.,Naruto University of Education
Perceptual and Motor Skills | Year: 2011

The present study examined whether improvement in control while decreasing force to achieve a lower force target would be facilitated by comparison of performance while increasing force to achieve a higher force target. Participants practiced control of isometric force and timing during a unimanual force production task cycling between 5 and 10% of maximum voluntary contraction with a target interval of 500 msec. Although errors and variability of both peak and valley forces and interval decreased during early practice, the valley force was still more inaccurate and variable than the peak force in the final practice. Variabilities of both forces did not decrease when the valley force was synchronized with an audible metronome pulse but did decrease when the peak force was synchronized with it. © Perceptual and Motor Skills 2011.


Masumoto J.,Hyogo University of Teacher Education | Inui N.,Naruto University of Education
Journal of Motor Behavior | Year: 2012

The authors examined whether force level interacts with the presence or absence of vision in bimanual force control. Participants produced periodic isometric forces such that the sum of the 2 finger forces was the target force under 4 force levels cycling between lower levels (5-40%) of maximum voluntary contraction with an interval of 1000ms. Without vision, the correlation between the 2 finger forces was strongly positive over all force levels. However, with vision the correlation changed from negative to positive with force level. The result with vision indicated that the strategy of the bimanual force control changed from force error compensation to force coupling and the available redundancy thus decreased with an increase in force. © 2012 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Masumoto J.,Hyogo University of Teacher Education | Inui N.,Naruto University of Education
Experimental Brain Research | Year: 2014

The present study examined the development of a leader–follower relationship in joint action performed by participants with different skill levels. Two participants were instructed to produce discrete isometric forces such that the sum of the forces was the target force. The task did not prescribe the onset time or share of force each participant contributed to the target force. Although novices with low force variability did not produce an earlier force than those with high force variability in the novice–novice group, experienced participants produced an earlier force than novices in the novice-experienced group. While participants with low force variability always produced a stronger force than those with high force variability in both the groups, there was no significant difference in force distributions between participants with low and high force variabilities. Although a novice-experienced pair produced force more complementarily than a novice–novice pair in the first practice block, the difference between pairs vanished after the first practice block, suggesting that leader–follower relations were not always beneficial to task performance. In addition, practice of the joint action did not transfer to individual action. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Masumoto J.,Hyogo University of Teacher Education | Inui N.,Naruto University of Education
Experimental Brain Research | Year: 2014

If two people row a boat, they often call to each other to synchronize their strokes. It is anticipated that such a call promotes periodic joint action. The present study thus examined the effects of speech on both complementary and synchronous strategies in joint action using the same task as we used previously (Masumoto and Inui in J Neurophysiol 109:1307-1314, 2013a). Ten pairs of participants produced periodic isometric forces such that the sum of the forces they produced was the target force cycling between 5 and 10 % of maximum voluntary contraction with an interval of 1,000 ms with the right hand. There were three speech conditions crossed with the presence or absence of visual information. Whereas two participants synchronized an utterance/ba/with the peak and valley forces in the 'Both' condition, one synchronized it with both forces in the 'One-side' condition, and nobody uttered it in the 'None' condition. When the total force was visible, the One-side and Both conditions exhibited lower correlations than the None condition, although the correlation between forces produced by two participants was negative in all conditions. When the total force was invisible, although the coherence between force and time series produced by two participants was low under the None condition, it was high at 1 and 3 Hz under the One-side and Both conditions. Thus, although periodically uttering a syllable worsened complementary force production when the target was visible, it promoted synchronization of their performance to each other's timing when the target was invisible. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.


Masumoto J.,Hyogo University of Teacher Education | Inui N.,Naruto University of Education
Journal of Neurophysiology | Year: 2013

If two people lift and carry an object, they not only produce complementary forces on the object but also walk in synchrony. Previous studies have not examined how two types of coordination strategy are adopted simultaneously. The present study thus tested the hypothesis that complementary and synchronous strategies simultaneously facilitate the action coordination performed by two people. Ten pairs of participants produced periodic isometric forces such that the sum of forces they produced was the target force cycling between 5% and 10% of maximum voluntary contraction with an interval of 1,000 ms (joint action), while individuals alone produced the same target forces with the right hand (individual action). The correlation between forces produced by two participants was highly negative when the total force was visible, indicating that the two participants produced complementary forces. When the image of the total or partner force was presented, the coherence between force-time series produced by two participants was highest at 1 Hz. The relative phase angles were also distributed at the 0-20° phase region. These innovative findings indicate that two participants simultaneously adopted both complementary and temporal synchronous strategies exclusively when the total force was visible. With the vision of total force, surprisingly, while the joint action exhibited a less variable force than the individual action, the joint action exhibited a smaller absolute error of forces than the individual action. These new findings indicated that the joint action controlled force more accurately than the individual action. © 2013 the American Physiological Society.


Gelloz B.,Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | Harima N.,Hyogo University of Teacher Education | Koyama H.,Hyogo University of Teacher Education | Elhouichet H.,Faculte des science de Tunis | Koshida N.,Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
Applied Physics Letters | Year: 2010

Nanocomposites consisting of oxidized porous Si (OPSi) impregnated with rhodamine 110 (Rh110) molecules are characterized in terms of luminescence properties. The photoluminescence and its polarization memory strongly indicates a trace of energy transfer from the fast blue luminescence band of OPSi to the green one of Rh110. Time-resolved experiments showed that energy transfer to Rh110 also takes place from the long-lived blue phosphorescence of OPSi. The transfer channel from nonradiative states of OPSi to Rh110 was also found. The ability of OPSi to harvest and transfer absorbed photon energy to a guest is promising for applications in optoelectronics and biology. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

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