HydroGeoLogic Inc

Reston, VA, United States

HydroGeoLogic Inc

Reston, VA, United States
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Van Breukelen B.M.,Technical University of Delft | Thouement H.A.A.,Technical University of Delft | Stack P.E.,Scotland’s Rural College | Vanderford M.,HydroGeoLogic Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Contaminant Hydrology | Year: 2017

Reactive transport modeling of multi-element, compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) data has great potential to quantify sequential microbial reductive dechlorination (SRD) and alternative pathways such as oxidation, in support of remediation of chlorinated solvents in groundwater. As a key step towards this goal, a model was developed that simulates simultaneous carbon, chlorine, and hydrogen isotope fractionation during SRD of trichloroethene, via cis-1,2-dichloroethene (and trans-DCE as minor pathway), and vinyl chloride to ethene, following Monod kinetics. A simple correction term for individual isotope/isotopologue rates avoided multi-element isotopologue modeling. The model was successfully validated with data from a mixed culture Dehalococcoides microcosm. Simulation of Cl-CSIA required incorporation of secondary kinetic isotope effects (SKIEs). Assuming a limited degree of intramolecular heterogeneity of δ37Cl in TCE decreased the magnitudes of SKIEs required at the non-reacting Cl positions, without compromising the goodness of model fit, whereas a good fit of a model involving intramolecular CCl bond competition required an unlikely degree of intramolecular heterogeneity. Simulation of H-CSIA required SKIEs in H atoms originally present in the reacting compounds, especially for TCE, together with imprints of strongly depleted δ2H during protonation in the products. Scenario modeling illustrates the potential of H-CSIA for source apportionment. © 2017 The Authors.


Thompson S.W.,HydroGeoLogic Inc. | Molz F.J.,Clemson University | Fjeld R.A.,Clemson University | Kaplan D.I.,Savannah River National Laboratory
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity | Year: 2012

Lysimeter experiments and associated simulations suggested that Pu moved into and through plants that invaded field lysimeters during an 11-year study at the Savannah River Site. However, probable plant uptake and transport mechanisms were not well defined, so more detailed study is needed. Therefore, experiments were performed to examine movement, distribution, and velocity of soluble, complexed Pu in corn. Corn was grown and exposed to Pu using a "long root" system in which the primary root extended through a soil pot and into a hydroponic container. To maintain solubility, Pu was complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB (Desferrioxamine B) or the chelating agent DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid). Corn plants were exposed to nutrient solutions containing Pu for periods of 10min to 10d. Analysis of root and shoot tissues permitted concentration measurement and calculation of uptake velocity and Pu retardation in corn. Results showed that depending on exposure time, 98.3-95.9% of Pu entering the plant was retained in the roots external to the xylem, and that 1.7-4.1% of Pu entered the shoots (shoot fraction increased with exposure time). Corn Pu uptake was 2-4 times greater as Pu(DFOB) than as Pu2(DTPA)3. Pu(DFOB) solution entered the root xylem and moved 1.74mh-1 or greater upward, which is more than a million times faster than Pu(III/IV) downward movement through soil during the lysimeter study. The Pu(DFOB) xylem retardation factor was estimated to be 3.7-11, allowing for rapid upward Pu transport and potential environmental release. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Huang D.,HydroGeoLogic Inc. | Huang D.,University of Maryland University College | Becker J.G.,Michigan Technological University | Becker J.G.,University of Maryland University College
Environmental Science and Technology | Year: 2011

In the vicinity of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminant source zones, aqueous concentrations of tetrachloroethene (PCE) in groundwater may approach saturation levels. In this study, the ability of two PCE-respiring strains {Desulfuromonas michiganensis and Desulfitobac- terium strain PCE1) to dechlorinate high concentrations of PCE was experimentally evaluated and depended on the initial biomass concentration. This suggests high PCE concentrations permanently inactivated a fraction of biomass, which, if sufficiently large, prevented dechlorination from proceeding. The toxic effects of PCE were incorporated into a model of dehalorespirer growth by adapting the transformation capacity concept previously applied to describe biomass inactivation by products of cometabolic TCE oxidation. The inactivation growth model was coupled to the Andrews substrate utilization model, which accounts for the self-inhibitory effects of PCE on dechlorination rates, and fit to the experimental data. The importance of incorporating biomass inactivation and self-inhibition effects when modeling reductive dechlorination of high PCE concentrations was demonstrated by comparing the goodness- of-fit of the Andrews biomass inactivation and three alternate models that do capture these factors. The newdehalorespiration model should improve our ability to predict contaminant removal in DNAPL source zones and determine the inoculum size needed to successfully implement bioaugmentation of DNAPL source zones. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Chen H.,HydroGeoLogic Inc | Pinder G.F.,University of Vermont
Transport in Porous Media | Year: 2011

An investigation of the effect of tidally influenced water elevations on the concentration of groundwater contaminants discharging to a surface-water body is studied using a one-dimensional homogeneous sand column. A constant water level is imposed upstream, and the downstream water level is controlled by a wave generator that controls the hydraulic head to mimic a 12-h tidal fluctuation. The experimental results demonstrate that the tidal fluctuations in the downstream reservoir result in a decrease in average contaminant concentration at the point of discharge to the tidally influenced surface-water body. The further upstream an observation well is located, the smaller the amplitude of the concentration oscillation. Fourier analysis suggests that the dominant frequency of the pressure at different locations along the length of the column is identically two cycles per day and that the concentration data have a dominant frequency of two cycles per day, but also exhibit harmonics. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Chen H.,Hydrogeologic Inc. | Pinder G.F.,University of Vermont
Transport in Porous Media | Year: 2011

Data from an one-dimensional homogeneous sand column, which is utilized to investigate the effect of tides on the concentration of groundwater contaminants discharging to a surface-water body, demonstrate that the tidal fluctuations in water level elevation create concentration oscillations upgradient of the groundwater discharge locations and there is a resulting decrease in average contaminant concentration at the point of groundwater discharge to a surface-water body. The further upgradient an observation point is located, the smaller the amplitude of the tidally induced concentration oscillations. In addition, an excessive upstream migration of concentration oscillations is observed although there is a net downgradient flow. As the classical groundwater flow and transport model could not reproduce this phenomena, a multi-mobility model is proposed with one highly mobile liquid phase, one less mobile liquid phase and a solid phase. Averaging theory is applied in a first step to develop the macroscopic mass conservation equation from its microscale counterpart and then, in a second step, averaging is again used to reduce dimensionality to one-dimensional governing equations defined along the axis of the column. The simulation confirms the existence of an enhanced tidally induced mixing process and the suitability of our mathematical-physical representation of it. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Figuli S.P.,SERDP ESTCP Support Office | Rupnik J.,HydroGeoLogic Inc.
Military Engineer | Year: 2010

The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) has worked in collaboration with sustainability consultants and military personnel at Naval Base Ventura County, California to develop a suitable framework and set of metrics that could be adapted to any military installation. The mission sustainability framework (MSF) consists of a set of six metric categories that includes mission, installation management, operations and maintenance, environment, quality of life, and neighbors and stakeholders. The MSF provides a broad framework for installations to develop metrics that monitor all aspects of installation sustainability. Several metrics are based on top-down reporting requirements that are applied across all facilities, such as presidential executive orders, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. Each metric has been scaled to a range of 0 to 100 to facilitate ease of indexing and comparison across metrics and MSF categories.


Huang D.,HydroGeoLogic Inc. | Lai Y.,Arizona State University | Becker J.G.,Michigan Technological University
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2014

Monod kinetics are the foundation of mathematical models of many environmentally important biological processes, including the dehalorespiration of chlorinated ethene groundwater contaminants. The Monod parameters-q max, the maximum specific substrate utilization rate, and K S, the half-saturation constant-are typically estimated in batch assays, which are superficially simple to prepare and maintain. However, if initial conditions in batch assays are not chosen carefully, it is unlikely that the estimated parameter values will be meaningful because they do not reflect microbial activity in the environmental system of interest, and/or they are not mathematically identifiable. The estimation of qmax and KS values that are highly correlated undoubtedly contributes significantly to the wide range in reported parameter values and may undermine efforts to use mathematical models to demonstrate the occurrence of natural attenuation or predict the performance of engineered bioremediation approaches. In this study, a series of experimental and theoretical batch kinetic assays were conducted using the tetrachloroethene-respirer Desulfuromonas michiganensis to systematically evaluate the effects of initial batch assay conditions, expressed as the initial substrate (S0)-to-initial biomass concentration (X0) ratio (S0/X0) and the S0/K S ratio on parameter correlation. An iterative approach to obtain meaningful Monod parameter estimates was developed and validated using three different strains and can be broadly applied to a range of other substrates and populations. While the S0/X0 ratio is critical to obtaining kinetic parameter estimates that reflect in situ microbial activity, this study shows that optimization of the S0/KS ratio is key to minimizing Monod parameter correlation. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.


PubMed | HydroGeoLogic Inc.
Type: | Journal: Journal of environmental radioactivity | Year: 2012

Lysimeter experiments and associated simulations suggested that Pu moved into and through plants that invaded field lysimeters during an 11-year study at the Savannah River Site. However, probable plant uptake and transport mechanisms were not well defined, so more detailed study is needed. Therefore, experiments were performed to examine movement, distribution, and velocity of soluble, complexed Pu in corn. Corn was grown and exposed to Pu using a long root system in which the primary root extended through a soil pot and into a hydroponic container. To maintain solubility, Pu was complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB (Desferrioxamine B) or the chelating agent DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid). Corn plants were exposed to nutrient solutions containing Pu for periods of 10 min to 10 d. Analysis of root and shoot tissues permitted concentration measurement and calculation of uptake velocity and Pu retardation in corn. Results showed that depending on exposure time, 98.3-95.9% of Pu entering the plant was retained in the roots external to the xylem, and that 1.7-4.1% of Pu entered the shoots (shoot fraction increased with exposure time). Corn Pu uptake was 2-4 times greater as Pu(DFOB) than as Pu(2)(DTPA)(3). Pu(DFOB) solution entered the root xylem and moved 1.74 m h(-1) or greater upward, which is more than a million times faster than Pu(III/IV) downward movement through soil during the lysimeter study. The Pu(DFOB) xylem retardation factor was estimated to be 3.7-11, allowing for rapid upward Pu transport and potential environmental release.

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