Hobart, Australia
Hobart, Australia

Hydro Tasmania, known for most of its history as The Hydro, is the government owned enterprise which is the predominant electricity generator in the state of Tasmania, Australia. The HEC was originally oriented towards hydro-electricity, due to Tasmania's dramatic topography and relatively high rainfall in the central and western parts of the state.Today Hydro Tasmania operates 30 hydro-electric and two gas power stations as well as three wind farms. Wikipedia.

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News Article | September 8, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

Global clean energy leaders have called on the Australian Government to back funding for renewable energy projects, following suggestions on both sides of the political aisle that they will hamstring the Australian Renewable Energy Agency from funding future renewable energy projects. Both the Liberal and Labor parties in Australia have suggested they will cut or eradicate the Australian Renewable Energy Agency’s (ARENA) ability to fund renewable energy projects. Australia’s Clean Energy Council (CEC) argued late August to protect ARENA’s renewable energy funding piggy-bank, arguing that “Legislation to be introduced to Parliament this week includes a $1 billion cut to ARENA’s grants funding, and puts everything that it has achieved at risk.” Following up on its own petition, the Clean Energy Council this week published an open letter signed by an impressive list of global clean energy leaders, calling on the Australian Government to protect ARENA’s funding. “Investment confidence would be again undermined if one of the first moves of the new parliament is to cut funding to Australia’s key clean energy agency. This would damage Australia’s reputation and unsettle investors, again,” says the letter. “Clean energy is one of Australia’s best opportunities for jobs, growth and innovation. ARENA’s ability to deliver new grant programs is at risk with legislation before the Australian Parliament that would substantially cut its future funding. While we respect the fiscal challenges facing the government and the nation, we believe that cutting ARENA’s budget would be short-sighted.” The signatories include Australian utilities such as AGL and Hydro Tasmania, as well as global clean energy juggernauts such as Canadian Solar, First Solar, Gamesa, and Vestas. (The full letter can be seen below.) The Clean Energy Council explains that up to $1.3 billion of ARENA’s funding is currently at risk under planned legislation from the Federal Government’s omnibus bill, which would significantly restrict financial support for renewable energy projects across Australia, hamstringing the growth of a vital new energy industry. “The innovations that ARENA is funding today will power the engine of tomorrow’s economy. The grants provided by the agency are modest investments that will lead to the jobs and investment of the future,” said Clean Energy Council Chief Executive Kane Thornton. “Hundreds of projects have been funded to date, and hundreds more are needed if we are to transform Australia’s energy system at the lowest possible cost to consumers.”   Drive an electric car? Complete one of our short surveys for our next electric car report.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


Morrison A.E.,Monash University | Siems S.T.,Monash University | Manton M.J.,Monash University | Nazarov A.,Hydro Tasmania
Monthly Weather Review | Year: 2010

The cloud structure associated with two frontal passages over the Southern Ocean and Tasmania is investigated. The first event, during August 2006, is characterized by large quantities of supercooled liquid water and little ice. The second case, during October 2007, is more mixed phase. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRFV2.2.1) is evaluated using remote sensed and in situ observations within the post frontal air mass. The Thompson microphysics module is used to describe in-cloud processes, where ice is initiated using the Cooper parameterization at temperatures lower than 288C or at ice supersaturations greater than 8%. The evaluated cases are then used to numerically investigate the prevalence of supercooled and mixed-phase clouds over Tasmania and the ocean to the west. The simulations produce marine stratocumulus-like clouds with maximum heights of between 3 and 5 km. These are capped by weak temperature and strong moisture inversions. When the inversion is at temperatures warmer than 2108C, WRF produces widespread supercooled cloud fields with little glaciation. This is consistent with the limited in situ observations.When the inversion is at higher altitudes, allowing cooler cloud tops, glaciated (and to a lesser extentmixed phase) clouds are more common. The simulations are further explored to evaluate any orographic signature within the cloud structure over Tasmania. No consistent signature is found between the two cases. © 2010 American Meteorological Society.


Negnevitsky M.,University of Tasmania | Nguyen D.H.,University of Tasmania | Piekutowski M.,Hydro Tasmania
IEEE Transactions on Power Systems | Year: 2015

Integration of wind power generation (WPG) is increasing rapidly worldwide. The variability and uncertainty of wind energy may lead to significant load-generation imbalances resulting in large frequency deviations, hence increasing system operational risks, especially in small and isolated power systems with low inertia and limited capabilities of providing frequency responses. This raises the need for investigating alternatives to current power system operation planning approaches to cope with the uncertain nature of the intermittent generation. This paper presents a risk assessment approach to analyze power system security for operation planning under high penetration of wind power generation. The proposed approach deals with not only steady-state voltage and overload evaluations, but also frequency response adequacy. For fast identification of operational limit violations in the proposed risk assessment method, we develop an analytical procedure for approximating frequency response and assessing the consequences of limit violations without performing dynamic simulations. As a result, the frequency response adequacy assessment can be run simultaneously with the steady-state voltage and overload evaluations. The proposed risk assessment approach is illustrated via its application to a model of a power system with high wind power penetration. © 1969-2012 IEEE.


Hull C.L.,Hydro Tasmania | Cawthen L.,University of Tasmania
New Zealand Journal of Zoology | Year: 2013

Bat carcasses from two wind farms in Tasmania (2002-2010) were assessed to determine the species, sex, age, reproductive state, morphometries, presence of food in the gastrointestinal tract, and evidence of spatial and seasonal patterns. Thirty-eight of the 54 carcasses were Gould's wattled bats, with another 14 likely to be, and two Vespadelus sp. All but two were adults, with an equal ratio of females and males. None were actively breeding when found, and five of the six bats tested, had not been recently feeding. Mortalities predominantly occurred in autumn, with a small difference between sites. There was no pattern in the location of carcasses. There appear to be particular ecological, morphological and behavioural characteristics associated with bat collision risk-tree roosting bats with high wing aspect ratios that forage in the open air at high altitude appear to be susceptible. Seasonal patterns may be associated with specific behaviours. © 2013 The Royal Society of New Zealand.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Electro Power Systems S.A. ("EPS"), a technology pioneer in energy-storage systems and microgrids listed on the French-regulated market Euronext Paris (EPS:FP), announces the commissioning of the new system microgrid connected in Flinders Island, northeast of Tasmania, will start in Q1 2017. EPS, in partnership with Toshiba, realized a hybrid storage system sired to Flinders Island's microgrid for Hydro Tasmania, Australia's largest producer of renewable energy. The utility is developing the "Flinders Island Hybrid Energy Hub" project that aims to increase the use of renewable energy on the island and dramatically reduce the use of fossil fuels, which so far have been the only electrical energy source on the island. The project, thanks to the EPS system, which combines renewables and energy storage, is intended to provide up to 65% of the island's annual energy demand, significantly reducing CO emissions and the consumption of diesel fuel by more than 60%. The microgrid has an installed capacity of 3MW that will provide, despite the critical weather conditions to which the island is exposed, stable renewable energy to approximately 900 people and it will be hybridized with 0.5 MWp of solar and 0.5 MWh of storage system manufactured by EPS, combined with 2.0 MVA of generators. The project does also contemplate the integration with wind energy. With the assistance of the Australian Renewable Energy Agency and the Tasmanian Government, the project was developed along the lines of the successful "King Island Renewable Energy Integration Project (KIREIP)", which covers 100% of King Island's power needs from renewable sources.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

Electro Power Systems S.A. (“EPS”) (Paris:EPS), a technology pioneer in energy-storage systems and microgrids listed on the French-regulated market Euronext Paris (EPS:FP), announces the commissioning of the new system microgrid connected in Flinders Island, northeast of Tasmania, will start in Q1 2017. EPS, in partnership with Toshiba, realized a hybrid storage system sired to Flinders Island’s microgrid for Hydro Tasmania, Australia’s largest producer of renewable energy. The utility is developing the “Flinders Island Hybrid Energy Hub” project that aims to increase the use of renewable energy on the island and dramatically reduce the use of fossil fuels, which so far have been the only electrical energy source on the island. The project, thanks to the EPS system, which combines renewables and energy storage, is intended to provide up to 65% of the island’s annual energy demand, significantly reducing CO emissions and the consumption of diesel fuel by more than 60%. The microgrid has an installed capacity of 3MW that will provide, despite the critical weather conditions to which the island is exposed, stable renewable energy to approximately 900 people and it will be hybridized with 0.5 MWp of solar and 0.5 MWh of storage system manufactured by EPS, combined with 2.0 MVA of generators. The project does also contemplate the integration with wind energy. With the assistance of the Australian Renewable Energy Agency and the Tasmanian Government, the project was developed along the lines of the successful “King Island Renewable Energy Integration Project (KIREIP)”, which covers 100% of King Island’s power needs from renewable sources. Electro Power Systems (“EPS”) operates in the sustainable energy sector, specializing in hybrid-storage solutions and microgrids that enable intermittent renewable sources to be transformed into a stable power source. Listed on the French-regulated market Euronext, EPS is part of the CAC® Mid & Small and the CAC® All-Tradable indices and has registered offices in Paris and research, development, and manufacturing in Italy. Thanks to technology covered by 125 patents and applications combined with more than 10 years of R&D, EPS has developed hybrid energy storage solutions to stabilize electrical grids heavily penetrated by renewable sources in developed countries and in emerging economies, to power off-grid areas at a lower cost than fossil fuels without the need for subsidy or incentive schemes. EPS has either installed or under commissioning in aggregate 36 large-scale projects, including off-grid hybrid systems powered by renewables and energy storage, totalizing that total more than over 35 MW of installed power and provide energy to more than 160,000 customers daily. In addition to more than 18 MW of grid-support systems, for a total capacity output of 47 MWh and 25 MW of systems in 21 countries worldwide, including Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa.


Hull C.L.,Hydro Tasmania | Muir S.C.,Symbolix Pty Ltd.
Wildlife Society Bulletin | Year: 2013

Understanding the interaction between eagles and wind farms is essential for the development of strategies to minimize collision risk, and to quantify avoidance rates for collision risk modeling. The purpose of our study was to measure the avoidance rates of Tasmanian wedge-tailed eagles (Aquila audax fleayi) and white-bellied sea-eagles (Haliaeetus leucogaster) using a new method, and to examine factors affecting these rates. We conducted eagle surveys at the Musselroe Wind Farm (undeveloped and used as a control); Studland Bay Wind Farm during commissioning and operational stages; and Bluff Point Wind Farm during the operational stage, all in northern Tasmania, Australia. Observers documented flight tracks and behavior of eagles over 875 days during the period 2006-2008. Both species demonstrated a distinct avoidance of the turbines, preferring to fly midway between them. Avoidance rates were 81%-97%, and differed significantly between species and sites, with white-bellied sea-eagles avoiding at a higher rate than wedge-tailed eagles. Eagles at Bluff Point had a higher avoidance rate than those at Studland Bay, even though the sites were only 3 km apart. Both species altered their avoidance rates in response to stages in the wind-farm development, but only the wedge-tailed eagle altered its rate in response to weather conditions, demonstrating a higher avoidance rate during wet and windy conditions. Our study found that the interaction of eagles and wind turbines is complex, which highlights the need for further study of avoidance rates in species at different sites. © 2013 The Wildlife Society.


Haritashya U.K.,University of Dayton | Kumar A.,Panjab University | Singh P.,Hydro Tasmania
Geomorphology | Year: 2010

Proglacial meltwater streams draining out of the Himalayan glaciers carry considerable amounts of suspended sediment, with a variety of particle sizes, because of the supraglacial, englacial, and subglacial debris, as well as formation of sediments from erosion by the movement of the ice. This paper examines particle size transported in the proglacial meltwater stream of Gangotri Glacier for seven consecutive melt seasons (May-October, 2000-2006) in order to provide information on (i) temporal variations in the particle size distribution, (ii) texture and mineralogy of the sediments, and (iii) origin and evacuation pattern of the sediments. Our results indicate dominance of silt size (0.002-0.06. mm) particles (71%) followed by sand size (0.06-0.6. mm) particles (24%) and clay size (<0.002. mm) particles (5%) during the melt season, with increased variation as melt season progresses. The sediment contains quartz, feldspar, mica, illite, and kaolinite minerals, which represent a poor to poorly sorted fraction with a coarse to fine skewed textural distribution. Overall, this study indicates a subglacial evacuation pattern of the suspended sediment based on (i) size classification, (ii) higher percentage of coarser particles toward the end of the melting season, (iii) symmetrical to positively skewed with a kurtosis of mesokurtic to platykurtic texture, and (iv) a less-rounded shape of particle size. Our result on the evolution of meltwater pathways indicates a progressively better interconnected drainage system with advancing melt season. The evolution of meltwater pathways also demonstrates complex behavior of the glacial system and the need for a better understanding of sediment availability and contribution. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


News Article | January 15, 2016
Site: www.topix.com

TASMANIA has been too slow to move away from gas-fired power generation and invest in renewable energy, according to former Hydro Tasmania chairman Peter Rae. TASMANIA has been too slow to move away from gas-fired power generation and invest in renewable energy, according to former Hydro Tasmania chairman Peter Rae.


News Article | November 16, 2015
Site: cleantechnica.com

Tasmania’s King Island was powered by 100 per cent renewable energy for a period of 33 hours non-stop this month, chalking up another huge milestone for the renewable energy system established on the island as part of a world-leading project by Hydro Tasmania. First announced in 2012, the King Island Renewable Energy Integration Project (KIREIP) – a $18.25 million prototype off-grid power plant combining solar panels, wind turbines and energy storage technology – aimed to reduce the Bass Strait island’s reliance on diesel fuel and cut its energy costs by $4.5 million a year by providing 65 per cent of its energy needs from renewables; perhaps 100 per cent on windy days. According to Hydro Tasmania’s KIREIP wesbite, the now completed project has achieved just under two full days in recent weeks of zero diesel operation, with the diesel supply completely turned off and replaced by renewable energy – an unprecedented milestone. “What makes this significant is that we’ve used renewable energy to support the needs of an entire community, which includes residential and industrial loads, for a full day,” said project director Simon Gamble. “Our system has successfully managed the peaks in energy consumption that occur over the course of a full day, including early evening when demand is at its highest and there’s no solar contribution. “It’s the first time anywhere that this has been achieved at a megawatt scale for such an extended period of time.” Ivor Frischknecht, the CEO of the Australian Renewable Energy Agency – which provided $6 million in funding for KIREIP – said the milestone was a live example of how different renewable energy and enabling technologies can work together to provide stable, reliable power around the clock. “Hydro Tasmania is using a unique combination of technologies to reduce King island’s reliance on expensive shipped in diesel and provide residents with a more secure and reliable energy source,” he said. “This innovative energy solution could benefit off-grid communities on islands and in regional mainland Australia. I look forward to seeing Hydro Tasmania continue to refine and commercialise its approach in other locations.” Indeed, the success of the project is being replicated by HydroTas through a similar project on Flinders Island, designed to prepare the solution for application internationally for remote and off-grid renewable energy supply. “The aim of KIREIP is to reduce diesel consumption for power generation on King Island by more than 65 per cent on average every year, and provide for the ability to generate 100 per cent of the island’s power needs using renewable energy when conditions allow,” said Gamble. “Achieving 100 per cent renewable energy penetration in large off-grid systems has remained elusive until now, and is very difficult to achieve given the need to maintain reliability and security of power supply under highly variable wind and solar conditions.” To this end, HydroTas uses its own advanced automated control systems and dynamic load control technology coupled with energy storage and a standard flywheel uninterruptible power supply system, commonly used in hospitals and telephone exchanges. This system enables all diesel generation to be switched off when there is sufficient wind and solar power to meet customer demand. The transition from diesel power station to 100 per cent renewables, and back again when and as required, is entirely automated and allows the station to achieve significant diesel savings while operating unstaffed. “Although there are remote area power systems in some parts of the world that are capable of supplying the energy needs of single homes or small villages, this is the first remote system on this scale capable of supplying the power needs of an entire community, including industrial customers and an extensive distribution network, solely through wind and solar energy,” Gamble added. Hydro Tasmania is currently commercialising its off-grid energy solutions and exporting these to customers in Australia, and in due course to the Pacific and the South East Asia region. Reprinted with permission.    Get CleanTechnica’s 1st (completely free) electric car report → “Electric Cars: What Early Adopters & First Followers Want.”   Come attend CleanTechnica’s 1st “Cleantech Revolution Tour” event → in Berlin, Germany, April 9–10.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  

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