Huyssensstift Kliniken Essen Mitte

Essen, Germany

Huyssensstift Kliniken Essen Mitte

Essen, Germany
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Landt S.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf | Wehling M.,Breast Center | Heidecke H.,CellTrend GmbH | Jeschke S.,University Hospital Berlin | And 6 more authors.
Anticancer Research | Year: 2011

Background/Aim: Angiogenesis is pivotal in tumour development and progress, and targeted tumour therapies, such as bevacizumab, have shown promising results. However, in unselected patient populations, the treatment with angiogenesis-targeted combination regimens is marred by a variable response, non-negligible toxicity and questionable economy. The present study summarizes research to identify individual circulating angiogenic factors as markers for disease severity and possibly treatment response. Patients and Methods: A total of 125 patients with cervical cancer from the ongoing cervical cancer monitoring database of the University Hospital Charité, Berlin, Germany, were included. Information obtained from the database included tumour stage, malignancy grade, presence of nodal metastases, lymph vessel invasion, patient age, HER2, HPV, smoking and menopausal status, and serum concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF-D, VEGF-C, endoglin, endostatin, angiogenin, basic fibroblast growth factor (FGFb), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF-R1), VEGF-R2, soluble inter-cellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM 1), soluble vascular adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM 1), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IFG-1) and insulin like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGF-BP3). Results: There was a clear association of angiogenic factor concentrations with stage of disease. Angiogenin showed an independent discrimination for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive stages, and endoglin did so for invasive stages vs. recurrent disease. However, none of the potential markers under investigation was anywhere near selective enough to allow for a clinically meaningful prediction of prognosis or response. Conclusion: The association of circulating angiogenic factors with disease progression in cervical cancer is confirmed, but its utility for prognosis prediction and patient stratification for targeted therapies is doubtful.


Landt S.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf | Heidecke H.,CellTrend GmbH | Reuter C.,University Hospital Berlin | Blohmer J.-U.,Sankt Gertrauden Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Anticancer Research | Year: 2011

Background/Aim: Angiogenesis plays a key role in tumour growth and metastasis. Expression of angiogenic factors has been suggested as a marker for tumour malignity, and may help to assess a patient's individual prognosis. The present study examines the relationship between angiogenic factor expression, an angiogenesis-based histoscore and clinical tumour criteria. Patients and Methods: A total of 81 patients with cervical cancer who underwent follow-up examinations between October 2002, and June 2005, were enrolled, and serum samples were examined for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), endostatin and VEGF-Receptor1 by means of an ELISA. Based on an endothelial-cell proliferation assay, an angiogenesis score was calculated. Results: Higher endostatin and VEGF expressions indicated advanced disease, and VEGF allowed for a reliable distinction between patients with non-invasive and these with recurrent disease. There were some plausible correlations between the angiogenesis score and clinical criteria and individual angiogenic factors, but the score's discriminating power appears to be limited. Conclusion: The utility of angiogenesis factor testing notwithstanding, the value of an angiogenesis score for the identification of patients with a worse prognosis, and thus a resulting benefit from more aggressive treatment, is arguable.


Landt S.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf | Mordelt K.,University Hospital Berlin | Schwidde I.,Breast Center | Barinoff J.,Huyssensstift Kliniken Essen Mitte | And 4 more authors.
Anticancer Research | Year: 2011

Background/Aim: Angiogenesis plays a key role in tumour growth and metastasis. Expression of angiogenic factors has been suggested as a marker for tumour malignity, and it may help to identify those patients with a poorer prognosis, aiding patient stratification for more aggressive and/or angiogenesis-targeted therapy. The present study examines the relationship between concentration of circulating angiogenic factors and clinical tumour criteria as well as patient survival. Patients and Methods: A total of 125 patients with cervical cancer who underwent follow-up examinations between October 2002 and June 2005 were enrolled, and serum samples were examined for angiogenin, endoglin and endostatin by means of an ELISA. Concentrations were statistically correlated with clinical and outcome parameters. Results: Concentrations of all examined angiogenic factors were on average within the manufacturer-provided normal range. Both angiogenin and endostatin increased from non-invasive tumours through invasive lesions to recurrent disease, and endoglin showed an equally steady inverse trend; differences between non-invasive, invasive and recurrent stages of the disease were statistically significant. However it was not possible to determine a sufficiently selective cut-off point for either factor by receiver operating characteristic analysis, and there was no significant correlation with survival. Conclusion: Angiogenic factors angiogenin, endoglin and endostatin show a definite relationship with disease stage in uterine cervical cancer, but are presently not suitable for use in risk stratification.


Landt S.,Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf | Heidecke H.,CellTrend GmbH | Reuter C.,University Hospital Berlin | Schwidde I.,Breast Center | And 4 more authors.
Anticancer Research | Year: 2011

Background/Aim: Targeted tumour therapies are promising, but their results in unselected patient populations are modest and tumour growth and metastasis may be promoted rather than suppressed in some cases. The present study investigates the suitability of vascular in vitro tube formation as a tool for the identification of cervical neoplasms that will respond to bevacizumab therapy. Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients with recurrent cervical cancer selected from the ongoing cervical cancer monitoring database of the Charité University Hospital Berlin, Germany, were included. Information obtained from the database included tumour stage, malignancy grade, presence of nodal metastases, lymph vessel invasion, patient age and menopausal status and serum concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), endostatin and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGF-R1). Vascular tube formation was assessed with cultured human umbilical vein epithelial cells. Results: Five patients showed a positive, 5 an inverse and 5 no in vitro response to bevacizumab. Tube length showed a marked and significant dependency on bevacizumab response. Besides tube length, VEGF-R1 concentration was the only variable with some correlation to bevacizumab response, with high levels especially for inverse responders. Conclusion: The identification of patients with a likely benefit from targeted therapies is crucial. Tube formation shows substantial potential, but its utility needs to be confirmed in studies on the clinical rather than in vitro response to bevacizumab.

Loading Huyssensstift Kliniken Essen Mitte collaborators
Loading Huyssensstift Kliniken Essen Mitte collaborators