South Hutchinson, MI, United States
South Hutchinson, MI, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Huber W.D.,Western Digital Corporation | Roen M.E.,Hutchinson Technology Inc. | Sajid N.,Hutchinson Technology Inc.
IEEE Transactions on Magnetics | Year: 2014

A description of techniques in the design of the front end integrated lead suspension is presented. Current coplanar microstrip transmission lines are challenged by future technology requirements, especially with respect to space constraints. Dual layer or broadside coupled transmission lines allow design flexibility that will enable these future challenges to be met. Analysis is made of the effect of head reader element resistance on system group delay, 2-D magnetic recording reader-to-reader crosstalk, as well as high bandwidth structures for propagating writer and pulsed laser signals in future heat assisted magnetic recording systems. All the critical future requirements are shown to be achievable. © 1965-2012 IEEE.


Orazem M.E.,University of Florida | Tribollet B.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Vivier V.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Marcelin S.,National Polytechnic Institute of Toulouse | And 6 more authors.
ECS Transactions | Year: 2013

Models invoking Constant-Phase Elements (CPE) are often used to fit impedance data arising from a broad range of experimental systems. While the physical origins of the CPE are controversial, a bigger problem remains the interpretation of impedance data in terms of physically meaningful properties such as capacitance or thickness. Four models are used to interpret the CPE parameters associated with the impedance response of human skin and two metal oxides in terms of characteristic frequencies, film thickness, and dielectric constant. These values were compared against independent measurements. The power-law model developed recently by Hirschorn et al. (1, 2) provided the most reliable interpretation. Readers are cautioned that the CPE parameter Q does not provide an accurate value for capacitance, even when the CPE exponent is greater than i0.9. © The Electrochemical Society.


Orazem M.E.,University of Florida | Frateur I.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Tribollet B.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Vivier V.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | And 6 more authors.
Journal of the Electrochemical Society | Year: 2013

Constant-Phase Elements (CPE) are often used to fit impedance data arising from a broad range of experimental systems. Four approaches were used to interpret CPE parameters associated with the impedance response of human skin and two metal oxides in terms of characteristic frequencies and film thickness. The values obtained with each approach were compared against independent measurements. The power-law model developed recently by Hirschorn et al.1,2 provided the most reliable interpretation for systems with a normal distribution of properties. Readers are cautioned that the CPE parameter Q does not provide an accurate value for capacitance, even when the CPE exponent a is greater than 0.9. © 2013 The Electrochemical Society.


Orazem M.E.,University of Florida | Tribollet B.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Vivier V.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Riemer D.P.,Hutchinson Technology Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Brazilian Chemical Society | Year: 2014

Constant-phase elements (CPE) are often used to fit impedance data arising from a broad range of experimental systems. The power-law model has proven to be a powerful tool for interpretation of CPE parameters resulting from an axial or normal distribution of time constants. This paper addresses difficulties in applying this model associated with uncertain values for one of the model parameters. Methods are presented for bounding the value of the parameter, for calibration, and for comparative analysis in which the unknown parameter may be eliminated. The methods are illustrated by data taken from the literature for oxides on steels and for human skin. © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Quimica.


Song J.-O.,University of Minnesota | Henry R.M.,Hutchinson Technology Inc. | Henry R.M.,Nexolve Corporation | Jacobs R.M.,University of Minnesota | Francis L.F.,University of Minnesota
Review of Scientific Instruments | Year: 2010

A magnetic microrheometer has been designed to characterize the local viscosity of liquid-applied coatings in situ during solidification. The apparatus includes NdFeB magnets mounted on computer-controlled micropositioners for the manipulation of ∼1 μm diameter superparamagnetic particles in the coating. Magnetic field gradients at 20-70 T/m are generated by changing magnet size and the gap distance between the magnets. A specimen stage located between two magnets is outfitted with a heater and channels to control process conditions (temperature and air flow), and a digital optical microscope lens above the stage is used to monitor the probe particle position. Validation studies with glycerol and polyimide precursor solution showed that microrheometry results match traditional bulk rheometry within an error of 5%. The viscosities of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solution and polyimide precursor solution coatings were measured at different shear rates (0.01-5 s-1) by adjusting the magnetic field gradient. The effect of proximity to the substrate on the particle motion was characterized and compared with theoretical predictions. The magnetic microrheometer was used to characterize the time-viscosity profile of PVA coatings during drying at several temperatures. The viscosity range measured by the apparatus was 0.1-20 Pa s during drying of coatings at temperatures between room temperature and 80 °C. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.


George M.E.,University of Minnesota | Beilman G.J.,University of Minnesota | Mulier K.E.,University of Minnesota | Myers D.E.,Hutchinson Technology Inc. | Wasiluk K.R.,University of Minnesota
Journal of Surgical Research | Year: 2010

Background: Hemorrhagic shock can lead to multiple organ failure and death. We have previously shown that noninvasive measurement of tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) has predictive value for outcomes in patients suffering hemorrhagic shock. Our study objectives were twofold: (1) to compare invasive and noninvasive measurements of local and systemic tissue hemoglobin oxygenation and (2) to compare the effects of various physiologic conditions seen in patients in hemorrhagic shock on tissue hemoglobin oxygenation. Materials and Methods: We studied pigs in controlled conditions mimicking shock induced by one of the following: hypothermia, isovolemic hemodilution, or manipulations of vascular tone. We obtained both invasive and noninvasive measurements in a hind limb of StO2, tissue hemoglobin index, femoral artery and venous flows, blood pressures, temperature, pH, pO2, pCO2, oxygen saturation, lactate, hemoglobin, and base excess. In all cases, we measured baseline values in both experimental and control hind limbs. Results: We found that tissue hemoglobin oxygenation did not vary significantly over relevant physiologic temperatures. Under all physiologic conditions tested, we found supply-dependent oxygen consumption at oxygen levels less than 7 mL O2/min/kg. Similarly, we found that local oxygen delivery in animals subjected to varying degrees of isovolemic hemodilution or altered vascular tone was correlated with supply-dependent oxygen consumption, as measured by local noninvasive StO2. Conclusions: Noninvasive StO2 measurements are valid and durable over a wide range of physiologic conditions and correlate with invasively-measured oxygen delivery. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Ramasamy S.,Hutchinson Technology Inc. | Kasper A.,Hutchinson Technology Inc.
Proceedings - ASPE 2010 Annual Meeting | Year: 2010

White Light Interferometers (WLI) have been traditionally been used for single field-of-view (FOV) surface measurements with emphasis on Z-axis resolution. Previous generation WLIs could accommodate panel level skew and rotation errors, and correct for those errors to locate individual single FOV measurements. But those systems didn't allow for component level translation and rotation correction. Further, the panel level corrections were more operator based visual alignments. The new generation machines have the capability of using vision analysis tools to make simple dimensional measurements like diameters and widths. But most of the applications are limited to only single FOV measurements and do not allow two-way communication between 2D and 3D datasets. This paper explains the efforts being conducted at Hutchinson Technology Inc (HTI) to explore the possibility of utilizing WLI as a versatile coordinate measuring machine (CMM) with a 10×10×0.35mm measuring range and at least 100nm resolution in at least one axis, which can handle z-data analysis on specified locations determined by datums that are established using vision processing on image data.


Patent
Hutchinson Technology Inc. | Date: 2011-03-02

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for acquiring and characterizing data relating to tissue oxygenation. Septic shock is the most serious complication of sepsis, a disorder that occurs when the body responds to an infection. Shock, including septic shock, is characterized by blood flow that is inadequate to meet tissue oxygen demand. Prompt recognition of inadequate organ and tissue blood flow, known as hypotension and hypoperfusion, is essential for timely treatment and improved outcome in shock related disorders. Thus, tissue oxygenation may be monitored as a means of monitoring and diagnosing shock, sepsis and other types of infections, as well as monitoring a patients overall health. The present invention provides An apparatus for analyzing data related to tissue oxygenation of body tissue, the apparatus comprising: control means configured for automatically controlling the restriction of blood flow to a selected tissue region of a patient for inducing a controlled ischemic event; communication means configured for receiving sensor input data from a light absorption sensor, the input data received from the light absorption sensor including measurements of a tissue chromophore whose light oxygenation capabilities depend on the oxygen state of the tissue before, during, and after the controlled ischemic event; and data processing means configured to analyze the sensor input data and automatically determine within the data an ischemia start point and an ischemia end point; wherein, in determining the ischemia start point and the ischemia end point for a controlled ischemic event, the data processing means is configured to analyze an initial tissue chromophore measurement at a first period of time when the blood flow is unrestricted and analyze one or more subsequent tissue chromophore measurements at a second period of time after the blood flow is restricted; and wherein the data processing means is configured to determine a correlation coefficient for comparison against a predetermined threshold from the initial tissue chromophore measurement and the one or more subsequent tissue chromophore measurements.


Patent
Hutchinson Technology Inc. | Date: 2011-02-23

A patient interface and method of locating the patient interface for use particularly in spectroscopy applications. The patient interface includes a concave region and first and second convex regions. A wing extends from the concave region to help locate the patient interface properly. The convex regions provide additional adhesion support, particularly when used on the thenar eminence. The patient interface may be placed in a number of locations on a patient to determine an optimum location for measurement prior to affixing the interface to the patient.


Patent
Hutchinson Technology Inc. | Date: 2011-03-02

A patient interface and method of locating the patient interface for use particularly in spectroscopy applications. The patient interface includes a concave region and first and second convex regions. A wing extends from the concave region to help locate the patient interface properly. The convex regions provide additional adhesion support, particularly when used on the thenar eminence. The patient interface may be placed in a number of locations on a patient to determine an optimum location for measurement prior to affixing the interface to the patient.

Loading Hutchinson Technology Inc. collaborators
Loading Hutchinson Technology Inc. collaborators