Hurley Regional Medical Center

Flint, MI, United States

Hurley Regional Medical Center

Flint, MI, United States

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Saha S.,McLaren | Freyvogel M.,McLaren | Johnston G.,McLaren | Lawrence L.,McLaren | And 6 more authors.
American Journal of Surgery | Year: 2015

Background Nodal positivity is correlated with a poorer prognosis in breast cancer. A study was composed to compare nodal positivity in patients with single versus multiple lesions found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and mammogram (MMG). Methods A retrospective study of breast cancer patients undergoing MRI and MMG was performed. Nodal positivity was compared in patients with additional invasive lesions found on MRI versus single invasive lesions found on MRI and MMG. Results A total of 425 patients were included. The overall nodal positivity was 23.8%. Patients with single versus multiple malignant lesions had nodal positivity of 20.9% vs 31.1% (P =.04). MRI detected multiple lesions in 120 patients, 80 of which were not detected by MMG (18.8%). Comparing single lesions with additional malignant lesions detected by MRI only, nodal positivity increased from 20.9% to 51.6% (P =.0002). Conclusions Patients with additional invasive lesions on MRI had significantly higher nodal positivity than single invasive lesions. Hence, addition of MRI in early-stage breast cancer may have prognostic value because of detection of potential node-positive patients. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


Saha S.,McLaren | Johnston G.,McLaren | Korant A.,McLaren | Shaik M.,Hurley Regional Medical Center | And 6 more authors.
American Journal of Surgery | Year: 2013

Background: The role of aberrant lymphatic drainage in changing operations for patients undergoing sentinel lymph node mapping in colon cancer has not been described on a large scale. Methods: Patients with colon cancer underwent sentinel lymph node mapping and standard oncologic resection. Aberrant lymphatic drainage was identified outside the standard resection margin, requiring change of the extent of operation. Objectives were to identify the frequency of aberrant lymphatic drainage leading to changes of operation and staging. Results: Among 192 patients undergoing standard oncologic resection, 42 (22%) had extended surgery because of aberrant lymphatic drainage. Nodal positivity was higher in patients undergoing change of operation, at 62% compared with 43% of those undergoing only standard oncologic resection. In 19 of 192 patients (10%), positive sentinel nodes were found in aberrant locations. Conclusions: Sentinel node mapping in patients with colon cancer detects aberrant drainage in 22% of patients, changing the extent of operation. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Hurley Regional Medical Center, McLaren and Regional Medical Imaging
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of surgery | Year: 2015

Nodal positivity is correlated with a poorer prognosis in breast cancer. A study was composed to compare nodal positivity in patients with single versus multiple lesions found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and mammogram (MMG).A retrospective study of breast cancer patients undergoing MRI and MMG was performed. Nodal positivity was compared in patients with additional invasive lesions found on MRI versus single invasive lesions found on MRI and MMG.A total of 425 patients were included. The overall nodal positivity was 23.8%. Patients with single versus multiple malignant lesions had nodal positivity of 20.9% vs 31.1% (P = .04). MRI detected multiple lesions in 120 patients, 80 of which were not detected by MMG (18.8%). Comparing single lesions with additional malignant lesions detected by MRI only, nodal positivity increased from 20.9% to 51.6% (P = .0002).Patients with additional invasive lesions on MRI had significantly higher nodal positivity than single invasive lesions. Hence, addition of MRI in early-stage breast cancer may have prognostic value because of detection of potential node-positive patients.

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