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NEW YORK, NY, November 03, 2016-- The Nevada Mesothelioma Victims Center is now offering a Veteran or a skilled trades worker such as a plumber or electrician with confirmed mesothelioma in Nevada a vital service to make certain they hire the nation's most skilled, qualified, and experienced attorneys to assist them with their potential compensation.What most people with mesothelioma do not realize is the nation's the nation's most elite lawyers who do nothing but mesothelioma will not only want to talk to them about the compensation-in most instances they will also want to personally handle the compensation claim and take a leadership role in getting better compensation for their client. For more information, a diagnosed person in Nevada or their family members are urged to contact the Nevada Mesothelioma Victims Center anytime at 800-714-0303. http://Nevada.MesotheliomaVictimsCenter.Com The Center says, "We do not want a US Navy Veteran, a construction worker, an electrician or a plumber in Nevada with mesothelioma to gamble on their compensation if they have been diagnosed with cancer caused by asbestos exposure. Mesothelioma is an incredibly rare-about 2500 US citizens will be diagnosed this year and because so much asbestos was used in the Nevada probably dozens of people will be diagnosed this year in Nevada."As we would like to explain anytime to a diagnosed person in Nevada or their family members if they call us anytime at 800-714-0303-if the most capable mesothelioma attorneys in the nation will do your compensation claim-why settle for a local car accident lawyer? The difference could be hundreds of thousands of dollars in additional compensation-or like we enjoy saying-'like 10 brand new F-150 fully equipped Ford pickup trucks. Why settle for less?" http://Nevada.MesotheliomaVictimsCenter.Com At the same time the Center is incredibly passionate about making certain a US Navy Veteran should be seen by physicians who have experience dealing with the treatment of mesothelioma. In the instance of Nevada some of the best possible treatment facilities may be in California or Utah, as the Center would like to explain:* Comprehensive Cancer Clinic Las Vegas, Nevada: http://www.cccnevada.com/ * UCLA Medical Center Los Angeles, California: https://www.uclahealth.org/reagan/Pages/default.aspx * The Huntsman Cancer Institute Salt Lake City, Utah: http://healthcare.utah.edu/huntsmancancerinstitute/ "If the diagnosed US Navy Veteran lives in Nevada, we are strongly encouraging them or their family to reach out to the Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City and/or the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. In both instances world class treatment is offered." http://Nevada.MesotheliomaVictimsCenter.Com High-risk work groups for exposure to asbestos in Nevada include Veterans of the US Navy, former power plant workers, shipyard workers, oil refinery workers, steel mill workers, miners, factory workers, miners, plumbers, electricians, auto mechanics, machinists, and construction workers. Typically, the exposure to asbestos occurred in the 1950's, 1960's, 1970's, or 1980's, and typically the exposure to asbestos did not occur in Nevada.The Nevada Mesothelioma Victims Center wants to emphasize their unsurpassed services for a diagnosed victim are available statewide anywhere in Nevada including communities such as Las Vegas, Reno, Carson City, Henderson, Paradise, and Enterprise.The states indicated with the highest incidence of mesothelioma include Maine, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Michigan, Illinois, Minnesota, Louisiana, Washington, and Oregon. However, mesothelioma can happen in Nevada, as the Center would like to explain anytime at 800-714-0303.For more information about mesothelioma please refer to the National Institutes of Health's web site related to this rare form of cancer: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/mesothelioma.html


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Preclinical imaging enables the measurement and assessment of biological processes in vivo utilizing methodologies such as bioluminescence, fluorescence and positron emission tomography (PET) to assay cells, tissues, and living organisms. PerkinElmer’s suite of optical and PET research scanners set the industry standard for sensitivity, quantitative accuracy, and data reproducibility. Such instruments helped to enable premier research institutions, like UCLA, the opportunity to advance preclinical and translational science while fostering collaboration among imaging laboratories both internally and externally. In this institutional highlight webinar series, participants will hear UCLA researchers share insight on how a successful imaging program at UCLA has been instrumental in generating novel models of disease and conducting cutting edge research. Employing several imaging modalities, these studies demonstrate a successful model for noninvasive, in vivo examination of spine implant infection where both bacterial burden and host inflammation can be monitored longitudinally in real-time without requiring animal sacrifice. The two UCLA researchers presenting during this webinar are Dr. Nick Bernthal, of the UCLA Global Orthopaedic Initiative, and Dr. Jason Lee, Director from the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology (DMMP) at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Bernthal is currently the chief at the Division of Musculoskeletal Oncology and director of the UCLA Global Orthopaedic Initiative. He graduated magna cum laude and phi beta kappa from Princeton University and received alpha omega alpha honors from Cornell University Medical School. He did his residency at UCLA in orthopaedic surgery and did fellowships in orthopaedic research and musculoskeletal oncology at UCLA and the Huntsman Cancer Institute, respectively. Lee is the director of the Preclinical Imaging Technology Center at the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging in the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology (DMMP), at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He received his doctorate in DMMP under Dr. Caius Radu and his postdoctoral training in molecular imaging at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center under Dr. Vladimir Ponomarev. His work focuses on the development and integration of in vivo imaging assays to quantitatively assess the functional dynamics of health and disease, and to study associated therapeutic interventions in preclinical models. This webinar, hosted by LabRoots at no cost to users, will be presented December 1, 2016 at 8:00 a.m. PT, 11:00 a.m. ET; the presentation will be followed by a live Q&A. To get the full details of this webinar and to register, click here. About LabRoots LabRoots is the leading scientific social networking website and producer of educational virtual events and webinars. Contributing to the advancement of science through content sharing capabilities, LabRoots is a powerful advocate in amplifying global networks and communities. Founded in 2008, LabRoots emphasizes digital innovation in scientific collaboration and learning, and is a primary source for current scientific news, webinars, virtual conferences, and more. LabRoots has grown into the world’s largest series of virtual events within the Life Sciences and Clinical Diagnostics community.


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

--California State Treasurer John Chiang, Huntsman Corp CEO Peter Huntsman and CTBC Bank Address Collaboration to Fill Gaps in Communities, Education and Healthcare LOS ANGELES, Dec. 13, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- California State Treasurer John Chiang, Huntsman Corporation   CEO Peter Huntsman and CTBC Bank today addressed the opportunity for stepped up collaboration among business, government and philanthropists at the bank’s annual year-end event. CTBC Bank’s signature Customer Appreciation Luncheon, which invites top clients and leading community members, was held at the Jonathan Club in downtown Los Angeles. “At CTBC we have made corporate social responsibilities an important part of our business strategies,” said Chao-Chin Tung, Chairman of CTBC Bank. "We are proud of the continued commitment that the bank has made to serve and give back to its local communities. In the United States, this includes our long-standing global partnership with the Huntsman Cancer Foundation and our more recent partnership with USC’s Rossier School of Education.” The program also included opening remarks by State Treasurer Chiang and a Q&A “Fireside Chat” with Peter Huntsman led by Noor Menai, President and CEO of CTBC Bank USA. Last month, the company released its CTBC Bank Survey: Philanthropy & Business, which explored the personal motivators behind why and how households with incomes of at least $250,000 donate and how they take into account a company’s charity with their consumer dollars when investing, spending or deciding on taking a job. The foreword of the CTBC philanthropy report was written by Jon M. Huntsman Jr., Chairman of the Huntsman Cancer Foundation and former U.S. Ambassador to China and former Governor of Utah. CTBC consulted experts from the University of Southern California and University of California, Los Angeles for survey development and analysis of the report findings. In addition, earlier this year, CTBC announced an additional major donation to the Huntsman Cancer Institute, a major American cancer center dedicated to Changing the DNA of Cancer Care. About CTBC Bank Corp. (USA) CTBC Bank USA is a trusted and established institution providing commercial and retail customers with a real financial bridge to the next state of their lives and businesses.  Founded in 1989 and headquartered in Los Angeles, CTBC Bank operates branches in California, New Jersey, and New York. The bank’s operations include deposits, loans, credit cards, foreign exchange, letters of credit, wealth management, mobile, and electronic banking services. Customers benefit from access to large bank resources coupled with individual attention and customized service of a small bank.  Its parent company, CTBC Bank Co. Ltd., is supported by nearly $110 billion in assets and is among the largest banks in the world in terms of capital. For more information about CTBC Bank, visit www.ctbcbankusa.com.


PubMed | University of Utah and the Huntsman Cancer Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of biological chemistry | Year: 2016

The cellular transport of the cofactor heme and its biosynthetic intermediates such as protoporphyrin IX is a complex and highly coordinated process. To investigate the molecular details of this trafficking pathway, we created a synthetic lesion in the heme biosynthetic pathway by deleting the gene HEM15 encoding the enzyme ferrochelatase in S. cerevisiae and performed a genetic suppressor screen. Cells lacking Hem15 are respiratory-defective because of an inefficient heme delivery to the mitochondria. Thus, the biogenesis of mitochondrial cytochromes is negatively affected. The suppressor screen resulted in the isolation of respiratory-competent colonies containing two distinct missense mutations in Nce102, a protein that localizes to plasma membrane invaginations designated as eisosomes. The presence of the Nce102 mutant alleles enabled formation of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes and respiratory growth in hem15 cells cultured in supplemental hemin. Respiratory function in hem15 cells can also be restored by the presence of a heterologous plasma membrane heme permease (HRG-4), but the mode of suppression mediated by the Nce102 mutant is more efficient. Attenuation of the endocytic pathway through deletion of the gene END3 impaired the Nce102-mediated rescue, suggesting that the Nce102 mutants lead to suppression through the yeast endocytic pathway.


PubMed | The Huntsman Cancer Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of pain and symptom management | Year: 2012

Neuropathic pain in patients with cancer can be difficult to treat effectively.The purpose of the study was to determine safety and efficacy of KRN5500, a novel, spicamycin-derived, nonopioid analgesic agent, in patients with advanced cancer and neuropathic pain of any etiology.The study was a Phase 2a, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalation clinical trial. Patients with refractory neuropathic pain and advanced cancer were randomly assigned 2:1 to receive a maximum of eight single escalating doses of KRN5500 or placebo, ranging from 0.6 to 2.2 mg/m(2). The primary objective was safety and tolerability. The secondary objective was efficacy, measured by change in average pain intensity on a 0-10 numeric rating scale administered one week after the patients final dose.Nineteen patients received treatment (KRN5500 n=12; placebo n=7). The most frequently reported adverse events were gastrointestinal symptoms, which were more frequent and severe with KRN5500 than placebo; two (17%) KRN5500 patients discontinued the study because of nausea and vomiting. At study endpoint, KRN5500 exhibited a significant median decrease in pain intensity from baseline of 24% compared with 0% for placebo (P=0.03). The median for largest weekly reduction in target pain intensity was 29.5% for KRN5500 and 0% for placebo patients (P=0.02).This proof-of-concept study for KRN5500 in patients with advanced cancer and any type of neuropathic pain found gastrointestinal adverse events to be the predominant safety concern. The results also provided the first indication of clinical and statistical efficacy in reducing pain intensity.

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