the Huntsman Cancer Institute

Salt Lake City, United States

the Huntsman Cancer Institute

Salt Lake City, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

University of Utah professors Bradley R. Cairns, professor and chair of Oncological Sciences and senior director of Basic Science; Dana Carroll, distinguished professor of Biochemistry; and Christopher D. Hacon, distinguished professor of Mathematics, were raised to a high honor in science today with their election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The three scientists join 225 U.S. scholars, scientists, writers, artists, as well as civic, business and philanthropic leaders, elected by the Academy, which is headquartered in Cambridge, Mass. Members of the 2017 class include winners of the Pulitzer Prize and the Wolf Prize, MacArthur Fellows, Fields Medalists, Presidential Medal of Freedom and National Medal of Arts recipients, and Academy Award, Grammy Award, Emmy Award and Tony Award winners. Bradley R. Cairns was honored for his work examining how chromatin, the structures that package chromosomal DNA, switch genes on or off. He is working to understand how changes in chromatin affect cellular mechanisms that can lead to cancer development. As an investigator at the Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah, Cairns is using zebrafish to study genes associated with many types of cancers. Along with this latest honor, Cairns has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000. "Dr. Cairns has made fundamental discoveries in the areas of DNA remodeling and regulation of gene expression that are influencing how we think about human development and disease," said Mary Beckerle, CEO and director of HCI. "In addition to his innovative and high-impact scientific work, Dr. Cairns is also an exceptional leader who has built a culture of excellence and collaboration at Huntsman Cancer Institute and the University of Utah. The American Academy of Arts and Sciences couldn't have chosen a better person to honor with membership in this distinguished society." Dana Carroll has been on the faculty at the U of U Health for 42 years. Starting 21 years ago, he developed the earliest of the precise genome editing platforms, zinc-finger nucleases. He has worked with ZFNs and the successor technologies, TALENs and CRISPR-Cas, all of which are being used around the world to learn the consequences of specific mutations, to improve agricultural plant and animals, and to develop treatments for human diseases. Carroll received both the 2012 Edward Novitski Prize from the Genetics Society of America and the 2014 Herbert Sober Lectureship from the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He also received the 2016 Distinguished Innovation and Impact Award from the University of Utah. "I am ecstatic to hear that Dr. Dana Carroll has been elected into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences," said U of U Vice President for Research Andrew Weyrich. "Dr. Carroll is a pioneer in the research community for his groundwork in genome editing platforms, which have been used effectively to modify the genomes of over 80 organisms. This is a great honor for his continuous dedication and contribution to research and science." Christopher Hacon is a scholar of algebraic geometry, the field of mathematics that studies geometric objects defined by polynomial equations. He is particularly interested in objects that exist in more than three dimensions, and he and his colleagues have applied studies of these objects to extend the "minimal model program," a foundational principle of algebraic geometry, into higher dimensions. The American Mathematical Society has lauded the work of Hacon and his colleagues as "a watershed in algebraic geometry." Hacon is a fellow of the American Mathematical Society and recipient of the 2016 EH Moore Research Article Prize, the 2015 Distinguished Scholarly and Creative Research Award from the University of Utah, the 2011 Antonio Feltrinelli Prize in Mathematics Mechanics and Applications, the 2009 Frank Nelson Cole Prize in Algebra and the 2007 Clay Research Award. "Hacon's election as a member of the AAAS stands in recognition of his towering stature as a research mathematician and his deep contributions not only to the discipline of mathematics, but also to the University of Utah," said Peter Trapa, chair of the Department of Mathematics. "It is an honor to welcome this new class of exceptional women and men as part of our distinguished membership," said Don Randel, Chair of the Academy's Board of Directors. "Their talents and expertise will enrich the life of the Academy and strengthen our capacity to spread knowledge and understanding in service to the nation." This release and associated images can be found here.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

VIDEO:  This video shows male mice on a wheel and in other locations through the cage. It also shows social interactions and activity. view more Living in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study published April 25 in Cell Reports reveals that cognitive stimulation, social interactions, and physical activity increase lifespan in mice with colon cancer by triggering the body's wound repair response. "The bottom line is that there are many benefits with minimal risks to reducing stress through mind-body interventions," says senior author Melinda Angus-Hill of the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah. "However, more research is essential to define whether mind-body interventions drive a wound repair response in colon tumorigenesis in humans." Mind-body medicine focuses on reducing the physiological manifestations of stress and anxiety by improving social and cognitive stimulation, as well as physical activity. A growing body of evidence suggests that mind-body medicine can significantly improve overall health. For example, epidemiological studies have found that depression, stress, and social isolation increase the risk of cancer progression. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these effects have not been clear. To address this question, Angus-Hill and her team exposed mice with colon cancer to environmental enrichment by housing them in cages filled with many other mice, along with running wheels, tunnels, huts, igloos, and nesting materials. The researchers found that exposure to stimulating surroundings increased the lifespan of male and female mice with colon tumors (55 days and 82 days, respectively) but most likely through different mechanisms. Environmental enrichment reduced tumor size in females but decreased blood levels of inflammatory molecules in males. A reduction in inflammation is a key step in the wound repair process, and it has long been recognized that tumors resemble wounds that do not heal. So the researchers suspected that environmental enrichment might also trigger other steps of the wound repair process, thereby improving the survival of male mice with colon cancer. Consistent with this idea, they found that environmental enrichment activated nuclear hormone receptor signaling pathways involved in wound repair and improved tumor vasculature in male mice with colon cancer. Blood vessels in the tumor microenvironment are often nonfunctional, preventing cancer drugs from reaching their target. Therefore, these findings suggest that environmental enrichment could improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic or immunotherapeutic agents to the colon tumor. "Our findings support additional studies into the future application of mind-body intervention in combination with conventional therapy for patients with colorectal cancer," Angus-Hill said. Moreover, environmental enrichment stimulated immune cells called plasma cells to produce an antibody called Immunoglobulin A (IgA), which attached to the surface of pericytes located on the outside of blood vessels. The activated, IgA-bound pericytes then migrated to and replaced glandular structures at the periphery of tumors, thereby sealing the wound in a process similar to scarring. Ultimately, the wound repair process restored the integrity of the colon barrier, defended against pathogens, and improved the composition of gut microbes, thereby reducing inflammation. "Our study demonstrates a positive role of environmental enrichment-induced IgA secreting plasma cells and raises the possibility of harnessing their potential for therapeutic purposes in colon cancer, particularly in people who practice stress reduction techniques and who are physically active," Angus-Hill says. Based on these findings, Angus-Hill and her team are now planning on initiating clinical trials to study the effects of mind-body therapy in patients with colon cancer. They would also like to examine how environmental enrichment improves the survival of female mice with colon cancer and what explains the different effects between the sexes. Another important goal will be to pinpoint the molecular mechanisms that are essential for the beneficial effects of wound repair following environmental enrichment. "This could aid in developing pharmacological strategies that mimic mind-body medicine," Angus-Hill says. "The availability of a pharmacological treatment to effortlessly reduce stress would be invaluable for cancer and disease prevention and treatment." The project was supported by the National Cancer Institute and the Huntsman Cancer Foundation. Cell Reports, Bice et al.: "Environmental Enrichment Induces Pericyte and IgA-Dependent Wound Repair and Lifespan Extension in a Colon Tumor Model" http://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(17)30481-3 Cell Reports (@CellReports), published by Cell Press, is a weekly open-access journal that publishes high-quality papers across the entire life sciences spectrum. The journal features reports, articles, and resources that provide new biological insights, are thought-provoking, and/or are examples of cutting-edge research. Visit: http://www. . To receive Cell Press media alerts, contact press@cell.com.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.sciencemag.org

The abrupt dismissal of the head of a Utah cancer center is causing backlash from its faculty—and its major philanthropic funder—in a struggle over the center’s autonomy from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. And nearly 2000 researchers have signed a petition calling on the university to reverse its decision. For 11 years, prominent cell biologist Mary Beckerle has headed the Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), which is based at the university but receives its funding largely from philanthropic donations, revenue from its cancer hospital, state funding, and grants from the National institutes of Health. In an email to some clinical staff on Monday, university President David Pershing and Vivian Lee, senior vice president for health sciences, announced that Beckerle would step down “effective today,” but would “remain on faculty as a distinguished professor in biology.” Beckerle, who has not responded to ’s request for comment, told that she had learned of her dismissal in an email less than an hour earlier. Details have been scant from the university, which also did not respond to a comment request. But Beckerle’s colleagues contend that the move amounts to a hostile takeover by the university aimed at capturing the cancer clinic’s revenue, and other prominent scientists are rallying unquestioningly around her. “I find it unimaginable that this would happen,” says cancer biologist Harold Varmus of Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City and former director of the National Cancer Institute, which funds HCI as one of its designated cancer centers. “If you think about great cancer directors around the country, her name comes to mind immediately.” Beckerle’s dismissal is “a real insult to the whole academic establishment that we all have been working to build up, and … an insult to American scientific leadership,” says University of California, San Francisco, biochemist Bruce Alberts (former president of the National Academy of Sciences and former editor-in-chief of ). Alberts served with Beckerle on the leadership board of the American Society for Cell Biologists, based in Bethesda, Maryland. Alberts is among more than 1800 signers of a petition on the website change.org calling for Beckerle’s reinstatement, which was delivered to Pershing’s office after a protest march from HCI yesterday. Billionaire industrialist Jon Huntsman, the Utah philanthropist whose funding helped build the center and has supported it since 1995, was apparently blindsided by the move, which came amidst negotiations for a new $120 million donation. He described Beckerle’s dismissal as a power grab by Lee, and promised to fight to reverse the decision. “I can't imagine anything worse than the University of Utah treating a donor the way they treated us,” Huntsman told the . "Until Vivian Lee is replaced and removed and fired … we have other buildings on the drawing board, other plans for expansion,” he said. (Huntsman is also a major benefactor of the university; its environmental research center, school of business, and indoor sports arena all bear his name.) University officials haven’t clearly explained their reasoning, says HCI molecular biologist Bruce Edgar, but “the general belief is that it has to do with resource allocation and control … [and] that the medical school would like to roll the cancer center into the health sciences center, including the revenue from the cancer hospital.” He adds that many faculty members are resistant to becoming an arm of the university’s health sciences center. “I think part of [Beckerle’s] dedication to the HCI has been to do negotiations on the part of HCI, to retain some autonomy,” he says. A press release published yesterday afternoon by University of Utah Health defending the decision says that “closer collaboration between HCI and the rest of the University will … enable us to apply the combined talent and resources of the University’s entire health system … to our mission of finding improved treatments and ultimately a cure for cancer.” Colleagues who credit Beckerle’s reputation and leadership with pulling the center from obscurity see the change as an existential threat to HCI. “As soon it’s gotten put on the map, they wanted to do a hostile takeover,” says Jody Rosenblatt, a cancer cell biologist at the institute. “If [Jon Huntsman is] not part of it, if Mary’s not the head of it, if we just have this coup and somebody takes over, people like me and lots of others of my colleagues that are constantly getting offers to take jobs in other places, we’re going to go,” she says. “It’s going to be the end of the Huntsman Cancer Institute.”


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Living in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study published April 25 in Cell Reports reveals that cognitive stimulation, social interactions, and physical activity increase lifespan in mice with colon cancer by triggering the body's wound repair response. "The bottom line is that there are many benefits with minimal risks to reducing stress through mind-body interventions," says senior author Melinda Angus-Hill of the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah. "However, more research is essential to define whether mind-body interventions drive a wound repair response in colon tumorigenesis in humans." Mind-body medicine focuses on reducing the physiological manifestations of stress and anxiety by improving social and cognitive stimulation, as well as physical activity. A growing body of evidence suggests that mind-body medicine can significantly improve overall health. For example, epidemiological studies have found that depression, stress, and social isolation increase the risk of cancer progression. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these effects have not been clear. To address this question, Angus-Hill and her team exposed mice with colon cancer to environmental enrichment by housing them in cages filled with many other mice, along with running wheels, tunnels, huts, igloos, and nesting materials. The researchers found that exposure to stimulating surroundings increased the lifespan of male and female mice with colon tumors (55 days and 82 days, respectively) but most likely through different mechanisms. Environmental enrichment reduced tumor size in females but decreased blood levels of inflammatory molecules in males. A reduction in inflammation is a key step in the wound repair process, and it has long been recognized that tumors resemble wounds that do not heal. So the researchers suspected that environmental enrichment might also trigger other steps of the wound repair process, thereby improving the survival of male mice with colon cancer. Consistent with this idea, they found that environmental enrichment activated nuclear hormone receptor signaling pathways involved in wound repair and improved tumor vasculature in male mice with colon cancer. Blood vessels in the tumor microenvironment are often nonfunctional, preventing cancer drugs from reaching their target. Therefore, these findings suggest that environmental enrichment could improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic or immunotherapeutic agents to the colon tumor. "Our findings support additional studies into the future application of mind-body intervention in combination with conventional therapy for patients with colorectal cancer," Angus-Hill said. Moreover, environmental enrichment stimulated immune cells called plasma cells to produce an antibody called Immunoglobulin A (IgA), which attached to the surface of pericytes located on the outside of blood vessels. The activated, IgA-bound pericytes then migrated to and replaced glandular structures at the periphery of tumors, thereby sealing the wound in a process similar to scarring. Ultimately, the wound repair process restored the integrity of the colon barrier, defended against pathogens, and improved the composition of gut microbes, thereby reducing inflammation. "Our study demonstrates a positive role of environmental enrichment-induced IgA secreting plasma cells and raises the possibility of harnessing their potential for therapeutic purposes in colon cancer, particularly in people who practice stress reduction techniques and who are physically active," Angus-Hill says. Based on these findings, Angus-Hill and her team are now planning on initiating clinical trials to study the effects of mind-body therapy in patients with colon cancer. They would also like to examine how environmental enrichment improves the survival of female mice with colon cancer and what explains the different effects between the sexes. Another important goal will be to pinpoint the molecular mechanisms that are essential for the beneficial effects of wound repair following environmental enrichment. "This could aid in developing pharmacological strategies that mimic mind-body medicine," Angus-Hill says. "The availability of a pharmacological treatment to effortlessly reduce stress would be invaluable for cancer and disease prevention and treatment."


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: phys.org

"The bottom line is that there are many benefits with minimal risks to reducing stress through mind-body interventions," says senior author Melinda Angus-Hill of the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah. "However, more research is essential to define whether mind-body interventions drive a wound repair response in colon tumorigenesis in humans." Mind-body medicine focuses on reducing the physiological manifestations of stress and anxiety by improving social and cognitive stimulation, as well as physical activity. A growing body of evidence suggests that mind-body medicine can significantly improve overall health. For example, epidemiological studies have found that depression, stress, and social isolation increase the risk of cancer progression. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these effects have not been clear. To address this question, Angus-Hill and her team exposed mice with colon cancer to environmental enrichment by housing them in cages filled with many other mice, along with running wheels, tunnels, huts, igloos, and nesting materials. The researchers found that exposure to stimulating surroundings increased the lifespan of male and female mice with colon tumors (55 days and 82 days, respectively) but most likely through different mechanisms. Environmental enrichment reduced tumor size in females but decreased blood levels of inflammatory molecules in males. A reduction in inflammation is a key step in the wound repair process, and it has long been recognized that tumors resemble wounds that do not heal. So the researchers suspected that environmental enrichment might also trigger other steps of the wound repair process, thereby improving the survival of male mice with colon cancer. Consistent with this idea, they found that environmental enrichment activated nuclear hormone receptor signaling pathways involved in wound repair and improved tumor vasculature in male mice with colon cancer. Blood vessels in the tumor microenvironment are often nonfunctional, preventing cancer drugs from reaching their target. Therefore, these findings suggest that environmental enrichment could improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic or immunotherapeutic agents to the colon tumor. "Our findings support additional studies into the future application of mind-body intervention in combination with conventional therapy for patients with colorectal cancer," Angus-Hill said. Moreover, environmental enrichment stimulated immune cells called plasma cells to produce an antibody called Immunoglobulin A (IgA), which attached to the surface of pericytes located on the outside of blood vessels. The activated, IgA-bound pericytes then migrated to and replaced glandular structures at the periphery of tumors, thereby sealing the wound in a process similar to scarring. Ultimately, the wound repair process restored the integrity of the colon barrier, defended against pathogens, and improved the composition of gut microbes, thereby reducing inflammation. "Our study demonstrates a positive role of environmental enrichment-induced IgA secreting plasma cells and raises the possibility of harnessing their potential for therapeutic purposes in colon cancer, particularly in people who practice stress reduction techniques and who are physically active," Angus-Hill says. Based on these findings, Angus-Hill and her team are now planning on initiating clinical trials to study the effects of mind-body therapy in patients with colon cancer. They would also like to examine how environmental enrichment improves the survival of female mice with colon cancer and what explains the different effects between the sexes. Another important goal will be to pinpoint the molecular mechanisms that are essential for the beneficial effects of wound repair following environmental enrichment. "This could aid in developing pharmacological strategies that mimic mind-body medicine," Angus-Hill says. "The availability of a pharmacological treatment to effortlessly reduce stress would be invaluable for cancer and disease prevention and treatment." More information: Cell Reports, Bice et al.: "Environmental Enrichment Induces Pericyte and IgA-Dependent Wound Repair and Lifespan Extension in a Colon Tumor Model" http://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(17)30481-3 , DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2017.04.006


NEW YORK, NY, November 03, 2016-- The Nevada Mesothelioma Victims Center is now offering a Veteran or a skilled trades worker such as a plumber or electrician with confirmed mesothelioma in Nevada a vital service to make certain they hire the nation's most skilled, qualified, and experienced attorneys to assist them with their potential compensation.What most people with mesothelioma do not realize is the nation's the nation's most elite lawyers who do nothing but mesothelioma will not only want to talk to them about the compensation-in most instances they will also want to personally handle the compensation claim and take a leadership role in getting better compensation for their client. For more information, a diagnosed person in Nevada or their family members are urged to contact the Nevada Mesothelioma Victims Center anytime at 800-714-0303. http://Nevada.MesotheliomaVictimsCenter.Com The Center says, "We do not want a US Navy Veteran, a construction worker, an electrician or a plumber in Nevada with mesothelioma to gamble on their compensation if they have been diagnosed with cancer caused by asbestos exposure. Mesothelioma is an incredibly rare-about 2500 US citizens will be diagnosed this year and because so much asbestos was used in the Nevada probably dozens of people will be diagnosed this year in Nevada."As we would like to explain anytime to a diagnosed person in Nevada or their family members if they call us anytime at 800-714-0303-if the most capable mesothelioma attorneys in the nation will do your compensation claim-why settle for a local car accident lawyer? The difference could be hundreds of thousands of dollars in additional compensation-or like we enjoy saying-'like 10 brand new F-150 fully equipped Ford pickup trucks. Why settle for less?" http://Nevada.MesotheliomaVictimsCenter.Com At the same time the Center is incredibly passionate about making certain a US Navy Veteran should be seen by physicians who have experience dealing with the treatment of mesothelioma. In the instance of Nevada some of the best possible treatment facilities may be in California or Utah, as the Center would like to explain:* Comprehensive Cancer Clinic Las Vegas, Nevada: http://www.cccnevada.com/ * UCLA Medical Center Los Angeles, California: https://www.uclahealth.org/reagan/Pages/default.aspx * The Huntsman Cancer Institute Salt Lake City, Utah: http://healthcare.utah.edu/huntsmancancerinstitute/ "If the diagnosed US Navy Veteran lives in Nevada, we are strongly encouraging them or their family to reach out to the Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City and/or the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. In both instances world class treatment is offered." http://Nevada.MesotheliomaVictimsCenter.Com High-risk work groups for exposure to asbestos in Nevada include Veterans of the US Navy, former power plant workers, shipyard workers, oil refinery workers, steel mill workers, miners, factory workers, miners, plumbers, electricians, auto mechanics, machinists, and construction workers. Typically, the exposure to asbestos occurred in the 1950's, 1960's, 1970's, or 1980's, and typically the exposure to asbestos did not occur in Nevada.The Nevada Mesothelioma Victims Center wants to emphasize their unsurpassed services for a diagnosed victim are available statewide anywhere in Nevada including communities such as Las Vegas, Reno, Carson City, Henderson, Paradise, and Enterprise.The states indicated with the highest incidence of mesothelioma include Maine, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Michigan, Illinois, Minnesota, Louisiana, Washington, and Oregon. However, mesothelioma can happen in Nevada, as the Center would like to explain anytime at 800-714-0303.For more information about mesothelioma please refer to the National Institutes of Health's web site related to this rare form of cancer: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/mesothelioma.html


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Preclinical imaging enables the measurement and assessment of biological processes in vivo utilizing methodologies such as bioluminescence, fluorescence and positron emission tomography (PET) to assay cells, tissues, and living organisms. PerkinElmer’s suite of optical and PET research scanners set the industry standard for sensitivity, quantitative accuracy, and data reproducibility. Such instruments helped to enable premier research institutions, like UCLA, the opportunity to advance preclinical and translational science while fostering collaboration among imaging laboratories both internally and externally. In this institutional highlight webinar series, participants will hear UCLA researchers share insight on how a successful imaging program at UCLA has been instrumental in generating novel models of disease and conducting cutting edge research. Employing several imaging modalities, these studies demonstrate a successful model for noninvasive, in vivo examination of spine implant infection where both bacterial burden and host inflammation can be monitored longitudinally in real-time without requiring animal sacrifice. The two UCLA researchers presenting during this webinar are Dr. Nick Bernthal, of the UCLA Global Orthopaedic Initiative, and Dr. Jason Lee, Director from the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology (DMMP) at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Bernthal is currently the chief at the Division of Musculoskeletal Oncology and director of the UCLA Global Orthopaedic Initiative. He graduated magna cum laude and phi beta kappa from Princeton University and received alpha omega alpha honors from Cornell University Medical School. He did his residency at UCLA in orthopaedic surgery and did fellowships in orthopaedic research and musculoskeletal oncology at UCLA and the Huntsman Cancer Institute, respectively. Lee is the director of the Preclinical Imaging Technology Center at the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging in the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology (DMMP), at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He received his doctorate in DMMP under Dr. Caius Radu and his postdoctoral training in molecular imaging at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center under Dr. Vladimir Ponomarev. His work focuses on the development and integration of in vivo imaging assays to quantitatively assess the functional dynamics of health and disease, and to study associated therapeutic interventions in preclinical models. This webinar, hosted by LabRoots at no cost to users, will be presented December 1, 2016 at 8:00 a.m. PT, 11:00 a.m. ET; the presentation will be followed by a live Q&A. To get the full details of this webinar and to register, click here. About LabRoots LabRoots is the leading scientific social networking website and producer of educational virtual events and webinars. Contributing to the advancement of science through content sharing capabilities, LabRoots is a powerful advocate in amplifying global networks and communities. Founded in 2008, LabRoots emphasizes digital innovation in scientific collaboration and learning, and is a primary source for current scientific news, webinars, virtual conferences, and more. LabRoots has grown into the world’s largest series of virtual events within the Life Sciences and Clinical Diagnostics community.


PubMed | University of Utah and the Huntsman Cancer Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of biological chemistry | Year: 2016

The cellular transport of the cofactor heme and its biosynthetic intermediates such as protoporphyrin IX is a complex and highly coordinated process. To investigate the molecular details of this trafficking pathway, we created a synthetic lesion in the heme biosynthetic pathway by deleting the gene HEM15 encoding the enzyme ferrochelatase in S. cerevisiae and performed a genetic suppressor screen. Cells lacking Hem15 are respiratory-defective because of an inefficient heme delivery to the mitochondria. Thus, the biogenesis of mitochondrial cytochromes is negatively affected. The suppressor screen resulted in the isolation of respiratory-competent colonies containing two distinct missense mutations in Nce102, a protein that localizes to plasma membrane invaginations designated as eisosomes. The presence of the Nce102 mutant alleles enabled formation of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes and respiratory growth in hem15 cells cultured in supplemental hemin. Respiratory function in hem15 cells can also be restored by the presence of a heterologous plasma membrane heme permease (HRG-4), but the mode of suppression mediated by the Nce102 mutant is more efficient. Attenuation of the endocytic pathway through deletion of the gene END3 impaired the Nce102-mediated rescue, suggesting that the Nce102 mutants lead to suppression through the yeast endocytic pathway.


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

--California State Treasurer John Chiang, Huntsman Corp CEO Peter Huntsman and CTBC Bank Address Collaboration to Fill Gaps in Communities, Education and Healthcare LOS ANGELES, Dec. 13, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- California State Treasurer John Chiang, Huntsman Corporation   CEO Peter Huntsman and CTBC Bank today addressed the opportunity for stepped up collaboration among business, government and philanthropists at the bank’s annual year-end event. CTBC Bank’s signature Customer Appreciation Luncheon, which invites top clients and leading community members, was held at the Jonathan Club in downtown Los Angeles. “At CTBC we have made corporate social responsibilities an important part of our business strategies,” said Chao-Chin Tung, Chairman of CTBC Bank. "We are proud of the continued commitment that the bank has made to serve and give back to its local communities. In the United States, this includes our long-standing global partnership with the Huntsman Cancer Foundation and our more recent partnership with USC’s Rossier School of Education.” The program also included opening remarks by State Treasurer Chiang and a Q&A “Fireside Chat” with Peter Huntsman led by Noor Menai, President and CEO of CTBC Bank USA. Last month, the company released its CTBC Bank Survey: Philanthropy & Business, which explored the personal motivators behind why and how households with incomes of at least $250,000 donate and how they take into account a company’s charity with their consumer dollars when investing, spending or deciding on taking a job. The foreword of the CTBC philanthropy report was written by Jon M. Huntsman Jr., Chairman of the Huntsman Cancer Foundation and former U.S. Ambassador to China and former Governor of Utah. CTBC consulted experts from the University of Southern California and University of California, Los Angeles for survey development and analysis of the report findings. In addition, earlier this year, CTBC announced an additional major donation to the Huntsman Cancer Institute, a major American cancer center dedicated to Changing the DNA of Cancer Care. About CTBC Bank Corp. (USA) CTBC Bank USA is a trusted and established institution providing commercial and retail customers with a real financial bridge to the next state of their lives and businesses.  Founded in 1989 and headquartered in Los Angeles, CTBC Bank operates branches in California, New Jersey, and New York. The bank’s operations include deposits, loans, credit cards, foreign exchange, letters of credit, wealth management, mobile, and electronic banking services. Customers benefit from access to large bank resources coupled with individual attention and customized service of a small bank.  Its parent company, CTBC Bank Co. Ltd., is supported by nearly $110 billion in assets and is among the largest banks in the world in terms of capital. For more information about CTBC Bank, visit www.ctbcbankusa.com.


PubMed | The Huntsman Cancer Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of pain and symptom management | Year: 2012

Neuropathic pain in patients with cancer can be difficult to treat effectively.The purpose of the study was to determine safety and efficacy of KRN5500, a novel, spicamycin-derived, nonopioid analgesic agent, in patients with advanced cancer and neuropathic pain of any etiology.The study was a Phase 2a, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalation clinical trial. Patients with refractory neuropathic pain and advanced cancer were randomly assigned 2:1 to receive a maximum of eight single escalating doses of KRN5500 or placebo, ranging from 0.6 to 2.2 mg/m(2). The primary objective was safety and tolerability. The secondary objective was efficacy, measured by change in average pain intensity on a 0-10 numeric rating scale administered one week after the patients final dose.Nineteen patients received treatment (KRN5500 n=12; placebo n=7). The most frequently reported adverse events were gastrointestinal symptoms, which were more frequent and severe with KRN5500 than placebo; two (17%) KRN5500 patients discontinued the study because of nausea and vomiting. At study endpoint, KRN5500 exhibited a significant median decrease in pain intensity from baseline of 24% compared with 0% for placebo (P=0.03). The median for largest weekly reduction in target pain intensity was 29.5% for KRN5500 and 0% for placebo patients (P=0.02).This proof-of-concept study for KRN5500 in patients with advanced cancer and any type of neuropathic pain found gastrointestinal adverse events to be the predominant safety concern. The results also provided the first indication of clinical and statistical efficacy in reducing pain intensity.

Loading the Huntsman Cancer Institute collaborators
Loading the Huntsman Cancer Institute collaborators