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News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Chart-topping Global Superstar to Perform Live at After Hours SILICON SLOPES, UT--(Marketwired - February 15, 2017) - Today Domo announced that global superstar Kesha will perform at Domopalooza™ 2017. Propelled to chart-topping success with four number-one singles, "Tik Tok," "We R Who We R," "Your Love Is My Drug," and "Timber," Kesha is a song-writer who has penned her own music, as well as songs for artists including Britney Spears, Ariana Grande, The Veronicas, and Miley Cyrus. Kesha is also an animal rights crusader as the Humane Society International's first Global Ambassador and a passionate advocate for equality, being honored with the 2016 Human Rights Campaign Visibility Award. Kesha will perform for Domopalooza attendees during After Hours, as will multi-Platinum artist Jason Derulo. Domo also recently announced inspiring keynote speakers including Pixar co-founder and president Dr. Ed Catmull, World Series game-changer Theo Epstein and world-renowned statistician Nate Silver. More mainstage speakers and musical entertainment will be announced soon. "Domopalooza is a must-attend event that offers it all: education, training, networking and entertainment," said Josh James, founder and CEO, Domo. "We're excited to bring Kesha and her chart-topping music to DP17." Domopalooza, Domo's annual customer event, is designed to educate, inform and inspire Domo's fast-growing community of users from the world's most progressive organizations and most recognizable brands. In its third year, Domopalooza will be held March 21 - 24, 2017, at The Grand America Hotel in Salt Lake City. From keynote presentations to more than 35 breakout sessions, hands-on personalized training and networking opportunities, attendees will gain valuable lessons from industry experts and fellow customers. They'll gain new insights on how to leverage Domo, and learn how all employees -- from the CEO to front line workers -- can use Domo to optimize business performance by connecting them to the right data and people they need to improve business results. For registration and to stay up-to-date on the program, visit Domopalooza's event page. Domo helps all employees -- from the CEO to the front line worker -- optimize business performance by connecting them to the right data and people they need to improve business results. Domo's Business Cloud is the world's first customizable platform that enables decision makers to identify and act on strategic opportunities in real time. The company is backed with more than $500 million from the world's best investors and is led by a management team with tenure at the world's most well-known technology companies. For more information, visit www.domo.com. You can also follow Domo on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Instagram and Pinterest. Domo, The Business Cloud, and Domopalooza are trademarks of Domo, Inc.


MONTREAL, QUEBEC--(Marketwired - Dec. 23, 2016) - Thirty-seven dogs have safely arrived at the Montreal SPCA after being rescued from slaughter by Humane Society International at the Yulin dog meat festival in China earlier this year. The dogs are part of a larger group of 110 dogs that HSI/Canada transported from China to Canada on December 21st to be placed in forever homes by local shelter partners in Ontario and Quebec. HSI rescued the 110 dogs from slaughterhouses and markets on the outskirts of Yulin just days ahead of the annual dog meat festival that took place on June 21st. The animals received veterinary care and rehabilitation at an HSI-funded emergency shelter in China before arriving in Canada. Adoption of rescue dogs in China is not yet widespread, necessitating the transfer of the dogs out of China. HSI is working with partner groups on the ground to promote a culture of adoption in the country. "The Montreal SPCA is pleased to assist HSI/Canada with this important rescue. We are relieved these dogs will soon be placed into loving families, where they will get the chance to live happy and healthy lives," stated Me. Alanna Devine, director of animal advocacy of the Montreal SPCA. Rebecca Aldworth, executive director of HSI/Canada, who greeted the animals upon their arrival in Toronto, said: "These dogs have endured a level of cruelty that most people can't even bear to think about. When we found them, the dogs were crammed into cages so tightly they could not move and they watched as other dogs were beaten to death in front of them. They were dehydrated, emaciated, injured and miserable when HSI rescuers arrived. But thanks to our amazing supporters, these dogs are recovering and will have a wonderful new life in Canada. Moreover, they will be ambassadors for our unrelenting campaign to fight the global dog meat trade." The Yulin dog meat festival, initiated in 2010 to boost dog meat sales, results in tens of thousands of dogs and cats slaughtered and eaten. International and national protest against the festival has reduced the scale of the event by 80 percent in recent years. Polling (Horizon, 2016) reveals that, of those holding an opinion, 78 percent of people in China believe the Yulin festival should be ended and 73 percent support a national ban on the dog meat trade. The 37 dogs are all settling in at the Montreal SPCA where canine behaviour experts, veterinarians and staff are working with them. Many of the dogs are timid and seeking patient and calm adoptive families to help them adjust to their new lives. They will become available for adoption as of Friday, January 6th 2017 at noon. For more information about the Montreal SPCA's adoption procedures, please click here. The remaining 60 dogs have been placed with two other compassionate Canadian organizations: Dog Tales Rescue and Sanctuary (based in King City, Ontario) and BARK (an Ottawa-based rescue group). This rescue would not have been possible without the generous support of The Eric S. Margolis Family Foundation, whose commitment to animal protection has changed the lives of countless animals worldwide. HSI would also like to thank Sharp Transportation for donating warehouse space for the temporary shelter and invaluable assistance with ground transport, Air Canada for logistical support for the air transport from China and Kane Veterinary Supplies for their generous donation of dog food. Please click here to download photos and video of the dogs; email or call media contact below for interview request and/or further information. The Montreal SPCA, founded in 1869, was the first animal welfare society in Canada. Their mission is to: protect animals against negligence, abuse, and exploitation; represent their interests and ensure their well-being, and raise public awareness and help develop compassion for all living beings. For more information about the Montreal SPCA, please visit our website at www.spca.com. Humane Society International/Canada is a leading force for animal protection, with active programs in companion animals, wildlife and habitat protection, marine mammal preservation, farm animal welfare and animals in research. HSI/Canada is proud to be a part of Humane Society International, which, together with its partners, constitutes one of the world's largest animal protection organizations. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide - on the Web at www.hsicanada.ca


News Article | October 24, 2014
Site: www.theguardian.com

The Western Australian government has conceded defeat over its plan to systematically trap and kill large sharks near popular beaches, after scrapping a proposal to implement the strategy over the next three years. Colin Barnett, the WA premier, confirmed on Friday that WA had withdrawn its application to the federal government for the shark culling to go ahead. However, WA has struck an agreement with the federal government that will enable it to implement the policy without approval from Canberra in emergency situations of “imminent shark threat”. This will mean the capture of any shark that is “posing a threat” or that has just attacked someone. “It is important that that we can take action to protect human life when necessary due to an imminent threat, without delay,” Barnett said. “The federal and state governments will work together so that the state government can take appropriate action to protect public safety when there is an imminent threat from a shark, as was the case in the recent attack in Esperance. “This approach strikes the necessary balance between protecting public safety and protecting our environment.” The WA government had wanted to string baited drumlines 1km out from more than 70 popular beaches in Perth and south-west WA for the next three years. Contractors on roving boats would shoot and kill any shark measuring over 3m found on the hooks. A 10-week trial of the strategy earlier this year saw 172 sharks captured, 50 of them over 3m. The drumlines will now be able to return, but only in “emergency” situations. An assessment by WA’s Environmental Protection Authority recommended that an extended culling program should not go ahead due to a “high degree of scientific uncertainty” about the impact upon the marine environment. The assessment delivered a mortal blow to the WA government’s hopes of getting approval from the federal government. The great white shark is nationally protected and catching and shooting it requires federal permission. The WA government’s backdown has been welcomed by groups who fiercely opposed the cull. The policy’s opponents, including a large number of scientists, decried it as cruel, unnecessary and potentially counterproductive as it would draw sharks closer to the beach. “The evidence is overwhelming that the cull policy proposed by the WA state government was flawed, and I think the federal minister for the environment would have had to reject the proposal,” said Greens senator Rachel Siewert. “Today’s outcome is a reflection of the strong community campaign against this cull and is a tribute to all those people in WA, around Australia and overseas who have joined rallies and shown their opposition to this plan.” However, Humane Society International (HSI) said the approval of the “imminent threat” policy was disappointing. “The imminent threat policy is a joke,” said Michael Kennedy, campaign director of HSI. “This is not only a complete waste of money, but also a complete mockery of the WA government’s commitment to improving the scientific understanding of white sharks. “With the bar set so low as to what constitutes an imminent threat, it is clear that it is still true that no shark in WA that swims near a beach is safe from being caught and killed.” There have been 11 shark attack deaths in WA waters since 2000. Earlier this month, a surfer lost a hand and part of his other arm in a shark attack off WA’s south coast.


News Article | October 27, 2016
Site: phys.org

The resolution, opposed by Japan and fellow whalers Norway and Iceland, was adopted by 34 "yes" votes to 17 against, at the 66th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC). It is not legally binding on members of the commission, which has no policing or penalty function. Submitted by Australia and New Zealand, the resolution seeks to "improve" the review process for scientific whaling programmes—which Japan alone conducts, netting more than 15,000 of the marine mammals since 1986. "We welcome this result as an important reaction to Japan unilaterally issuing its own permits for so-called scientific whaling," said Matt Collis of the International Fund for Animal Welfare. "We all know that scientific whaling is sham science, and simply commercial whaling by another name." Japan defended its annual Southern Ocean whale hunt, saying it was gathering scientific data. The country insisted its actions were in keeping with a 2014 ruling of the International Court of Justice (ICJ), which found that permits issued by Japan were "not for purposes of scientific research" and instructed the country to halt its JARPA II programme. "Reports oftentimes say (that) irrespective of the ICJ judgment Japan started the research, or in violation of the ICJ judgment... and that's not true," Japan's commissioner to the IWC, Joji Morishita told fellow delegates. In the judgment of the court itself, "it is clear that the ICJ assumes there can be future research activities," he insisted. "The ICJ also said... that the use of lethal sampling per se is not unreasonable in relation to the research objectives," Morishita added. After the court ruling, Japan cancelled its 2014-15 hunt, only to resume it the following year under a new programme called NEWREP-A (New Scientific Whale Research Program in the Antarctic Ocean). It killed 333 minke whales in the Southern Ocean—many of them pregnant, according to observers. The Southern Ocean hosts one of two whale sanctuaries in the world. The issue is a deeply divisive one at the biennial meetings of the IWC, which turned 70 this year. The meat from Japan's hunts ends up on supermarket shelves and in restaurants, in line with an IWC stipulation that whales taken for research must be eaten. Under the IWC moratorium, all whaling other than for aboriginal subsistence, or science, is prohibited. Japan hunts under the science exemption, while Norway and Iceland lodged formal objections to the moratorium and continue commercial hunts. New Zealand's commissioner Amy Laurenson expressed her country's "deep disappointment" with Japan's resumption of whaling without IWC approval. Japan had referred NEWREP-A to the IWC's scientific committee, but started whaling before it could complete a review, she said, and accused Tokyo of sidelining the commission. "On the basis of the information the commission has before it, it is clear that NEWREP-A is not in fact for purposes of scientific research," the commissioner argued, and called on Japan to "cease the lethal component of NEWREP-A". "Japan has still not justified the use of lethal sampling," she said. For Kitty Block of the Humane Society International, Thursday's vote shrank the scientific whaling "loophole". "With its continued defiance and its unfettered whaling, Japan is not just killing whales but making itself a true outlier in the community of nations," she said.


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.newscientist.com

Sometimes it’s pink, sometimes greeny-brown. But whatever the colour, whale dung could be the unlikely catalyst for ending whaling. The role of whale faeces in regenerating fish stocks will occupy centre-stage this week and next at the meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) in Portoroz, Slovenia. For the first time in the IWC’s 70-year history, delegates attending from member countries will be invited to acknowledge growing evidence that whales don’t decrease fish numbers – the primary excuse for continued whaling by Japan, Norway and Iceland – and they actually have the opposite effect. Research is revealing that whale dung brings nutrients to the surface waters, which generates food for more fish by stimulating the growth of phytoplankton, the tiny organisms that are eaten by krill. These then become prey for fish. Phytoplankton also suck carbon dioxide out of the air, helping to limit global warming. The unprecedented resolution, which member countries will vote on, was submitted by Chile. “Increasing scientific evidence shows that whales enhance ecosystem productivity by concentrating nitrogen and iron near the surface through the release of faecal plumes,” it says. “Iron defecation from whales stimulates carbon export into the Southern Ocean, and thus whales play an important role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.” The meeting is still likely to feature the usual argument over whether Japan, Norway and Iceland should stop killing whales altogether – in line with a moratorium on commercial whaling agreed 30 years ago (see “Whale meat again”, below). But conservationists are delighted that the call could help steer the IWC towards a more environmentally oriented agenda, recasting whales as “swimming rainforests”. “This is an exciting new horizon for the IWC,” says Claire Bass, UK director of Humane Society International. “It inspires us to see whales not as resources to be exploited, or as competitors for fish stocks, but as ecologically essential geo-engineers.” “It means there will be an increased focus on whale conservation activities rather than concentrating on whaling all the time,” says Sharon Livermore of the International Fund for Animal Welfare. It’s only in the last 10 years that we’ve started to appreciate the impact the animals have on the environment, which continues even after they die. “Whales sequester carbon in their enormous bodies and support entire deep-sea communities that depend on whale falls,” says Joe Roman of the University of Vermont in Burlington. One study in 2010 estimated that rebuilding whale populations to pre-whaling levels would remove 160,000 tonnes of carbon each year in sunken carcasses. Despite the optimism, though, the field is still young, and research sometimes throws up more equivocal results. Some studies have indicated that whales are important while others suggest their effect is insignificant, says Stephen Nicol of the University of Tasmania. “But I think that as this field develops, the evidence for the significant positive effect of whales and other large animals on marine ecosystems will continue to grow, and become part of mainstream ecological thought.” The Chilean resolution seeks to help resolve these uncertainties by encouraging the IWC to support more research on the issue. Livermore is optimistic about the likelihood of the resolution being accepted. “The draft resolution has a good chance of being adopted, either by consensus or majority vote,” she says. If this happens, and more research is commissioned, it could have huge benefits, says Roman. “Chile’s resolution is designed to help whales, people and the planet, and so whales have helped us reconsider the commercialisation of wildlife,” he says. And despite the murky appearance of most whale dung, there is a silver lining – when it floats to the surface, “we even see the water glisten from fish scales,” says Roman. Conservationists welcome research demonstrating what whales can do for us and the planet, but the 70th meeting of the International Whaling Commission is likely to focus yet again on discouraging Japan, Norway and Iceland from continued whaling. Despite an IWC ban on commercial whaling 30 years ago, these three countries have consistently found ways around it. Humane Society International (HSI) estimates that together, the countries have killed 40,000 whales since 1986. Japan justifies killing whales as part of a long-standing research programme.  Despite a verdict from the International Court of Justice in 2014 that its whaling activities are not for the purposes of science, Japan has continued its programme, killing 333 minke whales in 2015/16 , including 200 pregnant females. It also repeatedly seeks IWC authorisation for what it calls small-type coastal whaling, in which minkes and other small whales could legally be caught in Japanese waters by communities said to depend traditionally on the meat. In the IWC meeting, conservation groups will push strongly for commissioners to criticise Japan for its continued “scientific whaling”. They have also vowed to oppose strategies to sidestep the moratorium, including Japan’s small-type coastal whaling. “Loopholes also continue to be exploited by Iceland and Norway to kill whales for profit,” says Kitty Block, vice president of HSI. “The world has largely moved on from killing whales, and most of the IWC’s work is now quite rightly about the protection of whales, so it’s long overdue for these three countries to join the rest of the international community in protecting and conserving these majestic animals.” Other key issues to be debated in the next fortnight include: Pushing for creation of a South Atlantic Whale Sanctuary, which requires three-quarters of the member states to vote in favour Increasing research and efforts to reduce accidental capture and death of cetaceans in fishing nets, which kills an estimated 300,000 animals each year Strengthening measures to avoid harm to cetaceans from ship strikes, noise pollution and intrusive whale-watching


News Article | March 15, 2016
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced that it will consider African elephants, seven pangolin species, two bee species and two fish for protection under the Endangered Species Act. African elephants are currently listed as a threatened species. In response to two petitions from conservation groups, FWS will now consider changing their status to endangered, the next worst step beyond threatened. The agency will also, finally, consider listing African elephants as two species, the forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) and savannah elephant (L. africana), a taxonomic change that was formalized a few years ago. Conservationists estimate that nearly 100 elephants are killed by poachers every day for their valuable ivory. Protecting the African elephant as two species would not only offer more flexibly conservation actions, it could also help to enhance our greater understanding of the endangered pachyderms. “Splitting the two species would certainly draw more attention to the crisis in Central Africa,” says Tara Easter, a scientist with the Center for Biological Diversity, one of the petitioning organizations. “That would in turn provide more funding for actions specifically targeted for forest elephants or savannah elephants, which are facing different threats beyond the overall demand for ivory. Plus, there is so much we don’t know about forest elephants that we do for the more easily-observable savannah elephant.” FWS also agreed to consider listing the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla), giant ground pangolin (Smutsia gigantean), Indian pangolin (M. crassicaudata), long-tailed pangolin (Phataginus tetradactyla), Philippine pangolin (M. culionensis), Sunda pangolin (M. javanica) and tree pangolin (P. tricuspis) as endangered species. Currently just one of the eight pangolin species, the Temminck’s ground pangolin (S. temmincki), is protected by the ESA. Pangolins are among the most heavily trafficked animals on the planet. Protecting these international species under U.S. law is important because Americans are big buyers of illegal wildlife products, including both ivory and pangolin-derived “medicines.” “The U.S. is a destination for parts and products of poached pangolins,” Teresa M. Telecky, Ph.D., director of the wildlife department at Humane Society International, said in a prepared statement. “In 2014, authorities seized more than 11 kilograms of traditional Asian medicines containing pangolin, and seized an additional 460 individual medicine containers that also had pangolin parts. Our research shows that these products are sold here in the U.S. both online and in stores. Listing all pangolin species as Endangered will end the role of the United States in this harmful trade.” Also on today’s list of species that FWS says may deserve ESA protection: the western bumblebee (Bombus occidentalis), the yellow-banded bumblebee (B. terricola), the Rio Grande chub (Gila pandora), Rio Grande sucker (Catostomus plebeius), and a plant called the Leoncita false-foxglove (Agalinis calycina). FWS also agreed to consider petitions to remove three species from the ESA: the American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus), the Deseret milkvetch (Astragalns desereticns) and the southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus). Petitions to delist those species came from the energy, construction and ranching industries. On top of all of this, FWS found that an additional 15 petitions did not present enough information to take action. Those would have addressed protections for the Acuna cactus, Arizona night lizard, Arizona wetsalts tiger beetle, Bezy's night lizard, Cheoah bald salamander, Cow Knob salamander, MacDougal's yellowtops, Monito skink, Navasota ladies-tresses, Patagonia eyed silkmoth, reticulate collared lizard, South Mountain gray-cheeked salamander and southern dusky salamander. This is just the first step in the process for all of these species. FWS will now collect public comments for the next 60 days, after which it will begin a formal 12-month review to determine if Endangered Species Act protection is warranted.


News Article | October 30, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

Driven grouse shooting (Report, 28 October) is a minority “sport” which uses live birds as target practice, yet its destructive effects are paid for by the public. Earlier this year, Dr Mark Avery, Chris Packham, and the League Against Cruel Sports launched a petition calling on the government to ban driven grouse shooting. Shortly after the start of shooting season, the petition passed 100,000 signatures. The effects of driven grouse shooting are wide-ranging and devastating. Birds of prey are relentlessly persecuted to the point where the hen harrier is facing extinction in England. Other animals such as foxes, hares and stoats are wiped out on grouse moors using a range of cruel and indiscriminate devices. The burning of heather contributes to flooding and reduces the effectiveness of moorland to act as a reservoir to store carbon in the ground. All of this is done with considerable subsidy from the public purse; astonishing in these times of austerity. The government needs to take an impartial, scientific look at the industry, and its wider impact. Millions of animals are suffering and our moorlands are becoming monocultures. This is too high a price to pay for a minority hobby. We believe it is time to treasure our natural environment. It is time for a ban on driven grouse shooting. Isobel Hutchinson Director, Animal Aid Eduardo Goncalves CEO, League Against Cruel Sports Dominic Dyer CEO, Badger Trust Philip Mansbridge UK director, International Fund for Animal Welfare Claire Bass Executive director, Humane Society International UK Elisa Allen Director, Peta UK Anne Brummer CEO, Save Me Trust • Only agricultural land is eligible for Basic Payment Scheme (BPS) payments as determined by Defra’s Rural Payments Agency (RPA), which administers the scheme in England. The RPA guidelines make it clear that moorland used primarily for shooting purposes is not eligible for BPS payments, and there is also an “active farmer” test for claimants along with a range of other criteria to prove that the land is in agricultural use. The primary land use on many moors managed for grouse shooting is low-intensity grazing, often leased to a tenant farmer, and it is the farming side of the business which benefits from these payments, not grouse shooting. Defra may be surprised that anyone is trying to suggest that they are subsidising grouse shooting, but divisive, class-war rhetoric has been an unfortunate feature of the latest campaign against moorland management. This attempt to suggest that government subsidies are being used to pay for grouse shooting makes for sensational headlines, but doesn’t reflect the truth on the ground. Subsidies in the uplands are used to support agricultural and conservation activities, just as they are in the lowlands. These attempts to politicise the debate over how we manage our moorlands are deeply unhelpful, our solutions need to be driven by evidence and based in cooperation between landowners, conservationists and the shooting community. Liam Stokes Head of shooting, Countryside Alliance


MONTRÉAL, QUÉBEC--(Marketwired - 23 déc. 2016) - 37 chiens viennent d'arriver sains et saufs à la SPCA de Montréal. Grâce à Humane Society International (HSI), ils ont été sauvés du festival de la viande de chien en Chine qui se déroulait plus tôt cette année. Ces chiens font partie d'un groupe de 110 chiens que HSI/Canada a transporté le 21 décembre de la Chine vers le Canada avec pour objectif de les placer dans des familles adoptives, avec l'aide de partenaires locaux en Ontario et au Québec. Les 110 chiens ont été sauvés de l'abattoir et des marchés aux abords de Yulin, seulement quelques jours avant le festival de viande de chien qui se déroule chaque année le 21 juin. Avant d'arriver au Canada, les chiens ont reçu des soins vétérinaires et ont été réhabilités dans un refuge d'urgence financé par HSI en Chine.. L'adoption de chiens n'est pas encore une pratique très répandue en Chine ; leur transfert en dehors du pays est donc nécessaire. HSI travaille avec des groupes de partenaires locaux afin de promouvoir l'adoption d'animaux dans le pays. « La SPCA de Montréal est très heureuse d'avoir soutenu HSI/Canada dans ce sauvetage important. Nous sommes soulagés de savoir que ces chiens seront bientôt placés dans des familles aimantes où ils auront la chance de vivre heureux et en bonne santé », déclare Me Alanna Devine, directrice de la défense des animaux de la SPCA de Montréal. Rebecca Aldworth, directrice générale de HSI/Canada, qui a accueilli les animaux à leur arrivée à Toronto, a déclaré : « Ces chiens ont enduré un niveau de cruauté que la plupart des gens ne peuvent imaginer. Lorsque nous les avons trouvés, les chiens étaient entassés dans des cages si petites qu'ils ne pouvaient pas bouger. Ils pouvaient voir les autres chiens se faire battre à mort juste devant eux. Lorsque les secouristes de HSI sont arrivées, les chiens étaient déshydratés, amaigris, blessés et misérables. Mais grâce à nos remarquables partisans, ces chiens sont sur la voie de la guérison et mèneront une nouvelle vie merveilleuse au Canada. De plus, ils seront les ambassadeurs de notre campagne contre le commerce de viande de chien dans le monde. » Lancé en 2010 afin d'augmenter les ventes de viande de chien, le festival de la viande de chien de Yulin entraîne le massacre de milliers de chiens et de chats pour la consommation humaine. Les protestations nationales et internationales à l'encontre du festival ont permis de réduire l'ampleur de l'évènement de 80 % au cours de dernières années. Selon les sondages (Horizon 2016), parmi les personnes ayant une opinion sur le sujet, 78 % des Chinois pensent qu'il faut mettre un terme au festival de Yulin et 73 % sont pour une interdiction nationale du commerce de viande de chien. Les 37 chiens sont tous installés à la SPCA de Montréal où des spécialistes du comportement canin, des vétérinaires et des employés s'occupent d'eux. Plusieurs de ces chiens sont craintifs et auront besoin de familles adoptives patientes et calmes pour les aider qui les aideront à s'adapter à leur nouvelle vie. Ils seront disponibles dès le vendredi 6 janvier 2017 à midi. Pour plus de renseignement sur les procédures d'adoption de la SPCA de Montréal, veuillez cliquer ici. Les 60 chiens restants ont été placés auprès de deux autres organismes canadiens : Dog Tales Rescue and Sanctuary (situé à King City en Ontario) et BARK (un groupe de sauvetage d'Ottawa). Ce sauvetage a été rendu possible grâce au généreux soutien de la Eric S. Margolis Family Foundation, dont l'engagement envers la protection des animaux a changé la vie d'innombrables animaux à travers le monde. HSI tient également à remercier Sharp Transportation pour avoir fourni un espace d'entreposage et participé au transport terrestre, ainsi que Air Canada, et Kane Veterinary Supplies pour leurs généreux dons en nourriture pour chiens. Veuillez cliquer ici pour télécharger les photos et les vidéos des chiens; pour les demandes d'entrevue ou pour obtenir de plus amples informations, veuillez contacter la personne-ressource ci-dessous par courriel ou par téléphone. Fondée en 1869, la SPCA de Montréal est la première organisation vouée au bien-être animal au Canada. Les missions de la SPCA sont de protéger les animaux contre la négligence, les abus et l'exploitation; de représenter leurs intérêts et assurer leur bien-être; de favoriser la conscientisation du public et contribuer à éveiller la compassion pour tout être vivant. Pour avoir plus d'informations sur la SPCA de Montréal, rendez-vous sur notre site web www.spca.com. Humane Society International/Canada est un intervenant de premier ordre pour la protection des animaux, et met en œuvre des programmes actifs pour les animaux de compagnie, la protection des espèces sauvages et de leurs habitats naturels, la préservation des mammifères marins, ainsi que le bien-être des animaux d'élevage. HSI/Canada est fière de faire partie de Humane Society International, l'un des plus importants organismes de protection des animaux au monde. Notre site internet : hsicanada.ca


TORONTO, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - Dec. 23, 2016) - 110 dogs have arrived safely in Toronto after being rescued from slaughter by Humane Society International and our partners at the Yulin dog meat festival in China earlier this year. The 110 dogs were rescued from slaughterhouses in Yulin just days ahead of the annual dog meat festival that took place on June 21st. The animals received veterinary care and rehabilitation at an HSI-funded emergency shelter in China before arriving in Canada. Adoption of rescue dogs in China does take place, but it is not yet widespread, necessitating the transfer of the dogs out of China. HSI is actively working with our partner groups on the ground to promote a culture of adoption in the country. Rebecca Aldworth, executive director of HSI/Canada, who greeted the animals upon their arrival in Toronto, said: "These dogs have endured a level of cruelty that most people can't even bear to think about. When we found them, the dogs were crammed into cages so tightly they could not move and they watched as other dogs were beaten and killed in front of them. They were dehydrated, emaciated, injured and miserable when rescuers arrived. But thanks to our amazing supporters, these dogs are recovering and will have a wonderful new life in Canada. Moreover, they will be ambassadors for our unrelenting campaign to stop the global dog meat trade." The 110 dogs will be placed with three compassionate Canadian organizations: Dog Tales Rescue and Sanctuary (based in King City, Ontario), the Montreal SPCA, and BARK (an Ottawa based rescue group). Over the coming weeks the dogs will receive care from veterinarians, behavioural therapists, staff and volunteers before they are placed in forever homes. Danielle Eden, co-founder - Dog Tales Rescue and Sanctuary, added: "It breaks our hearts to think of what these dogs endured prior to their rescue. Our mission here at Dog Tales is to seek out the dogs who we feel need our help the most, and it is incredibly meaningful to our entire team to be able to play a part in providing these dogs with a second chance at life. Our hope is that all of the dogs will find loving, permanent homes quickly. However, as a no-kill shelter, Dog Tales will be home to these dogs for as long as they need. While in our care they will receive training and rehabilitation, world-class veterinary attention, regular grooming, daily off-leash play, and will be able to enjoy long walks on our beautiful 100 acre property. We are helping these dogs in honour of the millions who were not so lucky, with hope that we will soon see an end to the Yulin festival and the dog meat trade. We are proud to support HSI in this important initiative." Dana Margolis of The Eric S. Margolis Family Foundation, which provided crucial funds for the transportation of the dogs to Canada, stated: "We are so pleased to have helped make this rescue possible. Animals teach us to be compassionate and kind. These are traits that bring out the best in humanity. When faced with saving the life of an animal, there should be no hesitation." The Yulin dog meat festival, initiated in 2010 to boost dog meat sales, results in thousands of dogs and cats slaughtered and eaten. International and national protest against the festival has reduced the scale of the event by 80 percent in recent years. Polling (Horizon, 2016) reveals that, of those holding an opinion, 78 percent of people in China believe the Yulin festival should be ended and 73 percent support a national ban on the dog meat trade. This rescue would not have been possible without the generous support of The Eric S. Margolis Family Foundation, whose commitment to animal protection has changed the lives of countless animals worldwide. HSI would also like to thank Sharp Transportation for donating warehouse space for the temporary shelter and invaluable assistance with ground transport, Air Canada for logistical support for the air transport from China and Kane Veterinary Supplies for their generous donation of dog food. Please click here to download photos and video of the dogs; email or call media contact below for interview request and/or further information. Humane Society International/Canada is a leading force for animal protection, with active programs in companion animals, wildlife and habitat protection, marine mammal preservation, farm animal welfare and animals in research. HSI/Canada is proud to be a part of Humane Society International, which, together with its partners, constitutes one of the world's largest animal protection organizations. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide - on the Web at www.hsicanada.ca


Animals who escaped horrific fate to be placed in forever homes in Canada TORONTO, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - Dec. 22, 2016) - Humane Society International/Canada is transporting 110 dogs, rescued from the cruel dog meat trade in China, to temporary shelter in Toronto. The dogs will rest and receive care there prior to completing their journeys to shelters and rescue groups in Ontario and Quebec. Media is invited to the Cambridge shelter to film and photograph the dogs and to interview animal rescue and welfare experts on site. WHO: HSI/Canada rescue workers and companion animal experts, representatives from the Eric S. Margolis Family Foundation, and representatives from Dog Tales Rescue and Sanctuary. WHAT: Press conference to announce arrival of 110 dogs, rescued from slaughter at China's Yulin dog meat festival, in Toronto before they are transported to shelters and rescue groups in Ontario and Quebec. Please click here to download photos and video of the dogs; email or call media contact below for interview request and/or further information. Humane Society International/Canada is a leading force for animal protection, with active programs in companion animals, wildlife and habitat protection, marine mammal preservation, farm animal welfare and animals in research. HSI/Canada is proud to be a part of Humane Society International which, together with its partners, constitutes one of the world's largest animal protection organizations. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide - on the Web at www.hsicanada.ca

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