Human Genetics and Environmental science

Human, United States

Human Genetics and Environmental science

Human, United States
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Poonawalla I.B.,Human Genetics and Environmental science | Goyal S.,Rutgers Cancer Institute of New JerseyNJ | Allicock M.,University of Texas at Dallas | Allicock M.,University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center | And 2 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2014

Background: Breast cancer incidence is increasing among South Asian migrants to the United States (US). However, their utilization of cancer screening services is poor. This study characterizes attitudes of South Asians towards breast health and screening in a community sample. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) was conducted among South Asians (n=124) in New Jersey and Chicago. The following beliefs and attitudes towards breast cancer screening were assessed-health motivation, breast self-examination confidence, breast cancer susceptibility and fear, and mammogram benefits and barriers. Descriptive statistics and Spearman rank correlation coefficients were computed for HBM subscales. Findings: Mean age of participants was 36 years with an average 10 years stay in the US. Most women strived to care for their health (3.82±1.18) and perceived high benefits of screening mammography (3.94±0.95). However, they perceived lower susceptibility to breast cancer in the future (2.30±0.94). Conclusions: Increasing awareness of breast cancer risk for South Asian women may have a beneficial effect on cancer incidence because of their positive attitudes towards health and breast cancer screening. This is especially relevant because South Asians now constitute one of the largest minority populations in the US and their incidence of breast cancer is steadily increasing.


Liu Z.,Human Genetics and Environmental science | Nyitray A.G.,Human Genetics and Environmental science | Nyitray A.G.,Center for Infectious Diseases | Hwang L.-Y.,Human Genetics and Environmental science | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Infectious Diseases | Year: 2016

This study determined the prevalence and risk factors for genital human papillomavirus (HPV) detection among men who deny ever engaging in penetrative sex. A questionnaire was administered to 4123 men from a cohort study of HPV natural history. Genital exfoliated cells were collected and genotyped for 36 HPV types. Eighty-eight men were classified as virgins. Log-binomial regression models identified factors associated with genital HPV detection. The prevalence of any and high-risk HPV types among 88 male virgins was 25.0% and 18.2%, respectively. Age and smoking status were associated with HPV detection. Further studies are needed to better understand the risk for HPV infection among male virgins. © 2016 The Author.


PubMed | Instituto Nacional Of Salud Publica, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Human Genetics and Environmental science, Human Genetics and Environmental science Center for Infectious Diseases and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of infectious diseases | Year: 2016

This study determined the prevalence and risk factors for genital human papillomavirus (HPV) detection among men who deny ever engaging in penetrative sex. A questionnaire was administered to 4123 men from a cohort study of HPV natural history. Genital exfoliated cells were collected and genotyped for 36 HPV types. Eighty-eight men were classified as virgins. Log-binomial regression models identified factors associated with genital HPV detection. The prevalence of any and high-risk HPV types among 88 male virgins was 25.0% and 18.2%, respectively. Age and smoking status were associated with HPV detection. Further studies are needed to better understand the risk for HPV infection among male virgins.


Luu H.N.,Baylor College of Medicine | Amirian E.S.,Baylor College of Medicine | Chan W.,University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston | Beasley R.P.,Human Genetics and Environmental science | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Infectious Diseases | Year: 2012

Background.Little is known about the associations between CD4 + cell counts, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load, and human papillomavirus "low-risk" types in noncancerous clinical outcomes. This study examined whether CD4 + count and HIV load predict the size of the largest anal warts in 976 HIV-infected women in an ongoing cohort.Methods.A linear mixed model was used to determine the association between size of anal wart and CD4 + count and HIV load.Results.The incidence of anal warts was 4.15 cases per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.83-4.77) and 1.30 cases per 100 person-years (95% CI, 1.00-1.58) in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women, respectively. There appeared to be an inverse association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4 + count at baseline; however, this was not statistically significant. There was no association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4 + count or HIV load over time.Conclusions.There was no evidence for an association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4 + count or HIV load over time. Further exploration on the role of immune response on the development of anal warts is warranted in a larger study. © 2011 The Author.

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