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Kuo J.,Monash University | Koppel S.,Monash University | Charlton J.L.,Monash University | Rudin-Brown C.M.,Human Factors North Inc.
Journal of Safety Research | Year: 2015

Introduction: Internal driver events such as emotional arousal do not consistently elicit observable behaviors. However, heart rate (HR) offers promise as a surrogate measure for predicting these states in drivers. Imaging photoplethysmography (IPPG) can measure HR from face video recorded in static, indoor settings, but has yet to be examined in an in-vehicle driving environment. Methods: Participants (N = 10) completed an on-road driving task whilst wearing a commercial, chest-strap style heart rate monitor ("baseline"). IPPG was applied to driver face video to estimate HR and the two measures of HR were compared. Results: For 4 of 10 participants, IPPG produced a valid HR signal (±. 5. BPM of baseline) between 48 and 75% of trip duration. For the remaining participants, IPPG accuracy was poor (<. 20%). Conclusions: In-vehicle IPPG is achievable, but significant challenges remain. Practical applications: The relationship between IPPG accuracy and various confounding factors was quantified for future refinement. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. Source


Filtness A.J.,Monash University | Mitsopoulos-Rubens E.,Monash University | Rudin-Brown C.M.,Monash University | Rudin-Brown C.M.,Human Factors North Inc.
Applied Ergonomics | Year: 2014

Musculoskeletal pain is commonly reported by police officers. A potential cause of officer discomfort is a mismatch between vehicle seats and the method used for carrying appointments. Twenty-five police officers rated their discomfort while seated in: (1) a standard police vehicle seat, and (2) a vehicle seat custom-designed for police use. Discomfort was recorded in both seats while wearing police appointments on: (1) a traditional appointments belt, and (2) a load-bearing vest/belt combination (LBV). Sitting in the standard vehicle seat and carrying appointments on a traditional appointments belt were both associated with significantly elevated discomfort. Four vehicle seat features were most implicated as contributing to discomfort: back rest bolster prominence; lumbar region support; seat cushion width; and seat cushion bolster depth. Authorising the carriage of appointments using a LBV is a lower cost solution with potential to reduce officer discomfort. Furthermore, the introduction of custom-designed vehicle seats should be considered. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. Source


Frankel R.M.,Health Services Research and Development andD Center on Implementing Evidence Based Practice | Frankel R.M.,Indiana University | Frankel R.M.,Regenstrief Institute Inc. | Saleem J.J.,Human Factors North Inc.
Patient Education and Counseling | Year: 2013

Objective: Technical and interpersonal challenges of using electronic health records (EHRs) in ambulatory care persist. We use cockpit communication as an example of highly coordinated complex activity during flight and compare it with providers' communication when computers are used in the exam room. Methods: Maximum variation sampling was used to identify two videotapes from a parent study of primary care physicians' exam room computer demonstrating the greatest variation. We then produced and analyzed visualizations of the time providers spent looking at the computer and looking at the patient. Results: Unlike the cockpit which is engineered to optimize joint attention on complex coordinated activities, we found polar extremes in the use of joint focus of attention to manage the medical encounter. Conclusion: We conclude that there is a great deal of room for improving the balance of interpersonal and technical attention that occurs in routine ambulatory visits in which computers are present in the exam room. Practice implications: Using well-known aviation practices can help primary care providers become more aware of the opportunities and challenges for enhancing the physician patient relationship in an era of exam room computing. © 2013. Source


Trademark
Human Factors North Inc. | Date: 2016-07-12

Printed matter, namely, printed instructional, educational, and teaching materials in the field of management consulting, business psychology, competency framework, personal development programs, personality tests, organisational culture and strategy development; books, manuals and workbooks in the field of management consulting, business psychology, competency framework, personal development programs, personality tests, organisational culture and strategy development; printed questionnaires and surveys on personal development programs, personality and psychology; diagrams for use in management consulting, business psychology, competency framework, personal development programs, personality tests, organisational culture and strategy development; printed formulas for use in management consulting, business psychology, competency framework, personal development programs, personality tests, organisational culture and strategy development; pamphlets, booklets and newsletters in the field of management consulting, business psychology, competency framework, personal development programs, personality tests, organisational culture and strategy development; and printed reports featuring management consulting, business psychology, competency framework, personal development programs, personality tests, organisational culture and strategy development, all of the aforementioned goods for use in the field of human resources. Human resource analysis, namely, work analysis to determine worker skill sets and other worker requirements; personality tests and profiling assessment, namely, psychological testing for the selection of personnel; compiling of human resource statistical data; conducting business research and surveys, namely, conducting of workplace assessments through employee inquiries and interviews; drafting reports within the field of human resources, namely, expert evaluations and reports relating to business matters. Education services, namely, providing on-line classes, seminars, and workshops in the field of management consulting, business psychology, competency framework, personal development, administering personality tests and profiling assessment, all of the aforementioned services for use in the field of human resources; training services, namely, courses, seminars, conferences and workshops in the field of human resources.


Saleem J.J.,Human Factors North Inc. | Saleem J.J.,VA Health Services Research and Development HSR and D | Flanagan M.E.,Indiana University | Russ A.L.,VA Health Services Research and Development HSR and D | And 17 more authors.
Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association | Year: 2014

Challenges persist on how to effectively integrate the electronic health record (EHR) into patient visits and clinical workflow, while maintaining patient-centered care. Our goal was to identify variations in, barriers to, and facilitators of the use of the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) EHR in ambulatory care workflow in order better to understand how to integrate the EHR into clinical work. We observed and interviewed 20 ambulatory care providers across three geographically distinct VA medical centers. Analysis revealed several variations in, associated barriers to, and facilitators of EHR use corresponding to different units of analysis: computer interface, team coordination/workflow, and organizational. We discuss our findings in the context of different units of analysis and connect variations in EHR use to various barriers and facilitators. Findings from this study may help inform the design of the next generation of EHRs for the VA and other healthcare systems. Source

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