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Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy

Rohrmann S.,University of Zurich | Rohrmann S.,German Cancer Research Center | Overvad K.,University of Aarhus | Bueno-de-Mesquita H.B.,National Institute for Public Health and the Environment RIVM | And 53 more authors.
BMC Medicine | Year: 2013

Background: Recently, some US cohorts have shown a moderate association between red and processed meat consumption and mortality supporting the results of previous studies among vegetarians. The aim of this study was to examine the association of red meat, processed meat, and poultry consumption with the risk of early death in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).Methods: Included in the analysis were 448,568 men and women without prevalent cancer, stroke, or myocardial infarction, and with complete information on diet, smoking, physical activity and body mass index, who were between 35 and 69 years old at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the association of meat consumption with all-cause and cause-specific mortality.Results: As of June 2009, 26,344 deaths were observed. After multivariate adjustment, a high consumption of red meat was related to higher all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 1.28, 160+ versus 10 to 19.9 g/day), and the association was stronger for processed meat (HR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.24 to 1.66, 160+ versus 10 to 19.9 g/day). After correction for measurement error, higher all-cause mortality remained significant only for processed meat (HR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.25, per 50 g/d). We estimated that 3.3% (95% CI 1.5% to 5.0%) of deaths could be prevented if all participants had a processed meat consumption of less than 20 g/day. Significant associations with processed meat intake were observed for cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and 'other causes of death'. The consumption of poultry was not related to all-cause mortality.Conclusions: The results of our analysis support a moderate positive association between processed meat consumption and mortality, in particular due to cardiovascular diseases, but also to cancer. © 2013 Rohrmann et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Tarallo S.,HuGeF Human Genetics Foundation Turin | Pardini B.,HuGeF Human Genetics Foundation Turin | Pardini B.,University of Turin | Mancuso G.,HuGeF Human Genetics Foundation Turin | And 8 more authors.
Mutagenesis | Year: 2014

MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, are fundamental for the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Altered expression of miRNAs has been detected in cancers, not only in primary tissue but also in easily obtainable specimens like plasma and stools. miRNA expression is known to be modulated by diet (micro and macronutrients, phytochemicals) and possibly by other lifestyle factors; however, such influence has not yet been exhaustively explored in humans. In the present study, we analysed the expression levels of a panel of seven human miRNAs in plasma and stool samples of a group of 24 healthy individuals characterised by different dietary habits (eight vegans, eight vegetarians and eight subjects with omnivorous diet, all groups with similar age and sex distribution). The dual aim of the study was to identify possible differences in miRNA expression due to diet (or other lifestyle factors recorded from questionnaires) and to compare results in both types of specimens. miR-92a was differentially expressed in both plasma and stool samples and with the same trend, among the three groups with different diets (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.02, respectively, with expression levels of vegans>vegetarians>omnivores). miR-92a was also associated with low body mass index (P = 0.04 and P = 0.05, respectively) in both types of specimens, and with several dietary factors. Other analysed miRNAs (miR-16, miR-21, mir- 34a and miR-222) were associated with dietary and lifestyle factors, but not consistently in both stool and plasma. Our pilot study provides the first evidence of miRNA modulation by diet and other factors, that can be detected consistently in both plasma and stools samples. © The Author 2014. Source

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