Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy
Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy

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Roswall N.,Danish Cancer Society | Olsen A.,Danish Cancer Society | Boll K.,Danish Cancer Society | Christensen J.,Danish Cancer Society | And 57 more authors.
Public Health Nutrition | Year: 2013

Objective Health-beneficial effects of adhering to a healthy Nordic diet index have been suggested. However, it has not been examined to what extent the included dietary components are exclusively related to the Nordic countries or if they are part of other European diets as well, suggesting a broader preventive potential. The present study describes the intake of seven a priori defined healthy food items (apples/pears, berries, cabbages, dark bread, shellfish, fish and root vegetables) across ten countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and examines their consumption across Europe. Design Cross-sectional study. A 24 h dietary recall was administered through a software program containing country-specific recipes. Sex-specific mean food intake was calculated for each centre/country, as well as percentage of overall food groups consumed as healthy Nordic food items. All analyses were weighted by day and season of data collection. Setting Multi-centre, European study. Subjects Persons (n 36 970) aged 35-74 years, constituting a random sample of 519 978 EPIC participants. Results The highest intakes of the included diet components were: cabbages and berries in Central Europe; apples/pears in Southern Europe; dark bread in Norway, Denmark and Greece; fish in Southern and Northern countries; shellfish in Spain; and root vegetables in Northern and Central Europe. Large inter-centre variation, however, existed in some countries. Conclusions Dark bread, root vegetables and fish are strongly related to a Nordic dietary tradition. Apples/pears, berries, cabbages, fish, shellfish and root vegetables are broadly consumed in Europe, and may thus be included in regional public health campaigns. © The Authors 2014.


PubMed | National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, University of Tromsø, Lhospitalet Of Llobregat, German Institute of Human Nutrition and 21 more.
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2016

Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that vitamin D play a role in pathogenesis and progression of cancer, but prospective data on head and neck cancer (HNC) and oesophagus cancer are limited. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study recruited 385,747 participants with blood samples between 1992 and 2000. This analysis includes 497 case-control pairs of the head and neck and oesophagus, as well as 443 additional controls. Circulating 25(OH)D

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